Skip to main content

Full text of "The chemist and druggist [electronic resource]"

See other formats


THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



OCTOBER 5, 1935 



Chemist 



AN 



D Druggist 



Established 1859 


28 Essex Street, Strand, London, W.C.2 


Kegistered as a Newspaper 


No. 2904 
VOL. CXXIII 


OCTOBER 5, 1935 


Annual Subscription {with 
Diary) 20/-. Single Copies 9(7. 





A ]\[ew Sailesi'infikin^ i^ispiay 
for tkese popular Pastilles 



A chemist recently wrote : — 
" AUenburys' Glycerine and Black Currant 
Pastilles are not only streets ahead of any 
others in quality but also in profit. " 

Like many others, this chemist understands 
the business value of satisfied customers. 



"AUenburys" Glycerine and Black Currant 
Pastilles are extensively advertised. Link 
up with this advertising by displaying the 
distinctive showcard illustrated. It will 
increase your sales. 

Do not forget to buy on bonus terms. 



Telephone : 
:J2UI Bishdiisfate 



Allen & Hanburys 

Ltd. 

London, E.2 

Teletrrains : 
"Greenljurya Beth 




Index to AdvertiseTS, pp, 5 .0 6. 



ii 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



October 5, 1935 



SPECIAL TERMS ARE NOW AVAILABLE FOK PHARMACISTS 




HALIVEROia 

( HALl B UT - LI VEK OIL WITH VI05TEF10L) 
PARKE, DAVIS & CO., 50, BEAK STREET. LONDON, W/. 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



1 



0006 '0009 'OOOi NMOanOH TDM 'NOaNOl 

'NMOanOH HOIH 8^ 0± £L ' 011 >IDVH aUVMOB 

s±3nao>id xvMHi-iiNv qnv xvh do s>ioi3mdo>id 
3H1 Afl iDBuia aaiiddns aino sasnoH 3ivs31ohm 

yaivsaioHM vinoA wowd Ava-oi ^3a>jo 

zoQ -hOZ -IZLV -/0*Ji 



SDjASQ §U!§UE|-( LjllM ||y 

•|pM SB DpdXas 

3AELj JSpUIBUJd^ 'XlUO 
•3D!A3Q 

SujSuBi-) JO DpdXjs 0|SJ 



91 91. 

zoQ -/i7Z| . -/OO} -/09 

U 01. 6 9 

•zoQ -/09 -/♦Z^Z -/9€ -ISZ 



zoa 



■/9£ 



i7 ON 



9|P"«H indS-NON 



6C900t7 -ON 3U35Ed 

os^e^ ui OI±dA±S 




SON >13Davg 1S39 



SON >l3DaV9 3>Jnd 



■SON 3nsma "8 >i3Dava 



SON 3iisiya 3ynd 



NOQNOn Nl 3aVN 



dsn o!) qsn^q 

IJBM O^UI SMaJ3S >|OOH 



SdOiS 

DlldAUS 



i|snjq i|:>ca ij^jM udAjS 
3DNVHnSNI Hand 00 S7 



DNVH annoHS Hsn^a dniavhs v moh s.±vhi 

S3A iNMOa aOISd 



2 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



October 5, 1935 



NOTICE & WARNING 



GLASS PHIAL which screws Into BAKELITE CAP 



BAKELITE CAPj 
.; which i 
screws into i 



BAKELITE CASE 




THE COMBINED CONTAINER ILLUSTRATED IS COVERED 
BY PATENT NO. 40431 5 DATED JULY 1932 

Action will be taken to restrain infringement, and VENDORS 
of infringing Containers are warned that they (as well as 
Manufacturers) are liable to action for infringement. 

Vendors requiring further information please write to : 



EDWARD HACK Ltd. 




Products 



73/78 HIGH HOLBORN, LONDON, W.C.I TELE : HOLBORN 1000,6000,9000 



In the 

HIGH COURT of Justice 

A Writ has already been issued 
against one firm claiming damages 
and an injunction to restrain in- 
fringement of the above mentioned 

Patent No. 404315 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



3 



The following: is an extract from the 
OPINION OF WELL KNOWN 

KING'S COUNSEL 

PRACTISING IN PATENT LAW 

"There is no such thing as a 'Provisional Patent.' In- 
ventors may obtain provisional protection by filing a 
specification at the Patent Office, and in such cases 
sometimes loosely state that they have a ' Provisional 
Patent' or 'p.p. 

"Such a state of affairs is no protection at all against 
a claim by a prior patentee that the article infringes 
his rights, notwithstanding the common erroneous view to 
the contrary. 

"Buyers of goods advertised to be so 'protected' can 
only obtain real security by getting from the seller a 
written indemnity against all costs and damages which 
they may have to pay, and against the damage they may 
suffer, if an injunction is granted against them to 
prevent the sale of the article in question. " 

THE ORIGINAL MAY BE INSPECTED 
by Manufacturers, Wholesalers or 
Retailers at the Offices of: 

EDWARD HACK, LTD., 

Ppoprietops oT Hax and Anti-Thrax Products, 

73-78 High Holborn, 

London, W.C. 1 

Telephone : Holborn 1000, 6000, 9000 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



October 5, 1935 





A most palatable 
preparation of 
Malt Extract — 
& Chemical Food. 
It is an excellent 
body builder and 
once introduced 
it commands a 
ready sale. 



ir ATTRACTIVE PACKINGS 
AMPLE LITERATURE 
AND SHOW MATTER 
ARE AVAILABLE . . . . 




Samples and Prices at your disposal 



rejs Miller & 



LEYLAND MILLS 



WIGAN 



London Depot — 73A DURHAM ROAD, HOLLOWAY, N.7 



TELEPHONE : WIGAN 2327 i 
TELEGRAMS: MALTUM, WIGAN I 

TELEPHONE; ARCHWAY 3627 1 



October 5. 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



5 



INDEX TO ADVEUTISfiRS 



Acton Pill & Tablet Co., Ltd. (Uricure 

Tabltts) 26 

Allen & Hanburys, Ltd. (Glycerine and 

Blackcurrant Pastilles) Cover 

Anzora Perfumery Co., Ltd. (Anzora 

Cream and Viola) 14 

Aspro, Ltd. (Aspro) xxii 

Association of Manfg. Chemists, Ltd. 

Col. Snpp. 
Automatic Weighing and Pacliing 

Machine Co 26 

Ayer, Harriet Hubbard, Ltd. (Toilet 

Preparations) 14 

Baird, J., & Sons (Optical Frames and 
Lenses) 28 

Bartlett Distributing Co., Ltd. (Iodine 
Sock.s) 23 

Battle, J. C. M. (Vermin Killer) xxi 

Beeeliams Pills, Ltd. (Beecham Pro- 
ducts) ix 

Bell, John, Hills & Lucas, Ltd. (Cold 
Cure Capsules) Leader Page 

Berdoe & Fi.sh, Ltd. (Valuers, &c.) 

Col. Supp. 

Blackie, R. (Spun Ointments) viii 

Blackwell, Hayes & Co., Ltd. (Gale- 
nicals, &c.) iii 

Bleasdale, Ltd. (Sapo Mollis Virid 

B.P.) iv 

BIythe, W., & Co., Ltd. (Chemicals) ... iii 
Boehm, Fredk. Ltd. (Newfoundland 

Cod Liver Oil) 32 

Box 267/665 vii 

Brady & Martin, Ltd. (Galenicals, iVc.) iv 

Brierley, John (Valuer, &c.) Col. Supp. 

British Drug Houses, Ltd., The (Radio- 
Malt) 34 



Biitish Thomson Houston Co., Ltd. 
(Mazda Lamps) 22 

Brook, Parker & Co., Ltd. (Tablets, 
Pills, &c.) 32 

Brooks iV Warburton, Ltd. (Inner- 
Clean) xiv 

Burall Bros. (D. & P. Service) 26 

Burge, Warren & Ridgley, Ltd. (Sur- 
gical Rubber Goods) 26 

Burgoyne, Burbidges & Co., Ltd. 
(Normo-Gastrine Tablets) i 

Burrough, James, Ltd. (Orange Wine, 
&c.) Leader Page 

Burroughs Wellcome & Co. (' Kepler ' 
C.L.O. and Malt Extract) 33 

Bush, W. J., & Co., Ltd. (Guaiacol) iv 

Calendox, Ltd. (Gifts) 32 

Camwall, Ltd. (Pearlspring Barley 

Water) xvi 

Christy, T., & Co., Ltd. (Forvil Par- 

fums, Estivin) 21, 26 

Clark, S. F. (Valuer, &c.) Col. Supp. 

Cooper Laboratory, Ltd. (Halibut Liver 

Oil Tablets) ii 

Cossor, A. C, & Son (Thermometers), 

Ltd. (Clinical Thermometers) 22 

Cox, A. H., & Co., Ltd. (All Fours 

Cubes) Cover 

Crookes Laboratories (Halibut Liver 

Oil) 9 

Crown Capsule Co. (Soluble Medicinal 

Capsules) xviii 

Daniel, R., & Son, Ltd. (Daiiia Brand 
Compressed Tablets) 32 

Denver Chem. Mfg. Co. (Anti- 
phlogistine) xv 



Drake & Dahm (Tran.slators), Ltd. 

Leader Page 

Dudley & Co., Ltd. (Display Fittings) 13 
Duncan, Flockhart & Co. (Ethyl- 
Chloride) vi 

Ellis, J. E., Ltd. (Daisylax) xii 

Eucryl, Ltd. (Glazo Manicure Preps.)... 12 
Ex-Lax, Ltd. (Laxative Chocolate) xi 

Faire Bros. & Co., Ltd. (Sphere Powder 

Puffs) 16 

Fairy Dyes, Ltd. (Morning Pride Shav- 
ing Cream) 16 

Fassett & Johnson, Ltd. (Ovoferrin) ... xvii 

Fennings, A. (Lung Healers) xix 

Ferber, Robert, Ltd. (Capsules) xi 

Foyles Libraries, Ltd. (Books) 28 

Gambles, J. C, & Co., Ltd. (Stablond 
Shampoos) 15 

Gardiner & Co. (The Scotch House), 
Ltd. (Overall.s) 13 

Gardner, W., & Sons (Glos.), Ltd. 
(Machinery) xx 

George, Ernest J., & Co. (Valuers, &c.) 

Col. Supp. 

Gidlow. A., & Co. (Shaving Cream, &c.) 26 

Glycerine, Ltd ii 

Grout & Co., Ltd. (Norvic Crepe Ban- 
dages) 22 

Guyot-Guenin & Son (Tamar Indien 
Grillon, &c.) xi^ 

Hack, Edward, Ltd. (Anti-Thrax Shav- 
ing Brushes, &c.) 1, 2, 3 & 13 

Hackett, S. E. (Film Overstocks) 

Col. Supp. 
[Continued overleaf. 





PRODUCTS 



RHEUMATISM 

Sufferers from Rheumatic Affections are legion. 
Response to treatment is often slow, but 

TAB. ARTHRITONE 

(H. H. & CO.) 

are regularly prescribed by the medical profession and 
often give definitely good results when other treatments 
have failed. Tab. Arthritone are indicated In Osteo and 
Rheumatoid Arthritis and all painful rheumatic condi- 
tions. Supplied in bulk for dispensing and prescribing. 

4/6 per 100, 30/- per 1,000 net. 

A reliable product with an excellent formula. 

HOUG H, HOSEASON . Co. Ltd. 

MANUFACTURING CHEMISTS 
Bridge Street, MANCHESTER 



"Phone: BLAckfriars 3895 6, 7435 



(4 

'Grams : " Salicylace, Manchester." 



6 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



October 5. 1935 



INDEX— ^ont. 

Hampden Residential Club Col. Siipp. 

Harley, T., Ltd. (Rodine) xxi 

Harrison, A., & Sons, Ltd. (Printing) ... 10 
Hopkin & Williams, Ltd. (Chemicals)... ii 
Hough, Hoseason & Co., Ltd. (Tab. 
Arthritone) 5 

Jaclison, E., & Co., Ltd. (Lozenges, 

Pastilles, &c.) xiii 

Jeffreys, Miller & Co., Ltd. (Jef-o-Mil) 4 
Josephs, Philip, & Sons, Ltd. (Shop- 
fittings) Col. Siipp. 

Lamb & Watt, Ltd. (Cocktails) xvi 

Lambert, L., & Co., Ltd. (Caramel) ... xix 

Leigh & Sons (Carboy Hampers) xx 

Lofthouse & Saltmer, Ltd. (Lo.^all's 

Salt) xvi 

London & Provincial Factors, Ltd. 

(Wanie Blades) 16 

London College of Pharmaey... Leader Page 
Low, Son & Haydon, Ltd. (Toilet Pre- 
parations) 26 

McGlaslian, D., Ltd. (Abdine) xvi 

Matthews, 1)., & Sons (Shopflttings) 

Col. Supp. 
JVlamid, F., & Berg, E., Ltd. (Show- 
cases) 26 & Col. Supp. 

Maw, »., Son ii Sons, Ltd. (Christmas 

Merchandise) 11 

Mawdsley, D., & Co. (Malt and Cod 

Liver Oil) 26 

Methylating Co., Ltd. (Methylated 

Spirit) ill 

Midgley & Parkinson, Ltd. (Yeast 

Preparations) 26 

Monsanto Chemicals, Ltd. (Phthalic 

Anhydride Flakes) Cover 

Mundet Cork Products, Ltd. (Corks 

and Stoppers) xxi 

National School of Chiropody 28 

New Era Treatment Clo., Ltd. 
(Elasto) 7 



News of the World 27 

Xewball Alason, Ltd. (Extract of 

Herbs) xvii 

Newton, Clianibers & Co., Ltd. (Izal 

Toilet Rolls) 25 

iMovio Paper Co. (Toilet Paper) 20 

Nusheen \'ita Colour Rinses 26 

Olley, C. & Sons, Ltd. (Corks) xviii 

Oppenheinier, Son & Co., Ltd. (Robo- 

leine) xiv 

Oiridge & Co. (Valuers, &c.) Col. Supp. 

Owbridge, W. T., Ltd. (Lung Tonic) ... x 

Parke, Davis & Co. (Haliverol) Cover 

l^erken, Son & Co., Ltd. (Clinical 

Thermometers) 20 

Pharmaceutical Specialities (May & 

Baker), Ltd. (Medical Specialities) 17, 18 
Potter & Clarke, Ltd. (Wholesale 

Druggists) 31 

Prideaux s, Ltd. (English Dried Milk) xix 
Putnams Dependable Service (Poultry 

Remedies) 26 

Reliance Rubber Co., Ltd. (Hot Water 

Bottles) 23 

Robinson & Sons, Ltd. (Mene Towels)... 22 

Rose, J. L., Ltd. (Pyrogallic Acid, &c.) iv 

Sangers, Ltd. (Glymiel Jelly) 19 

Schering, Ltd. (Camphor B.P., &c.) ... 6 

Scintillating Sign Service xx 

Scottish Peat Compound & Chemical 

Co., Ltd. (Meriipeat) 28 

Scurr, C. A. (Optical Tuition) 28 

Shadeine Co. (Hair Dyes) 26 

Sherley, A. F., & Co., Ltd. (Veteri- 
nary Preparations) xxi 

Siemens Electric Lamps & Supplies, 

Ltd 24 

Smith, T. & H., Ltd. (Alkaloids) \\\ 

Sulazzi Liquorice ii 



Southalls (Birmingham), Ltd. (Cellulose 

Handkerchiefs, &c.) 20-23 

Spencer Bros. (Hot Water Bottle 

Covers) 25 

Starke, R. \V. B. (Camomile Oil) 26 

Sterns, Ltd. (Oils, Petroleum) xv 

Suter, A. F., & Co., Ltd. (Gums) vi 

Suttley & Silverlock, Ltd. (Chemists' 
Printing) 24 

Thompson & Capper Wholesale, Ltd. 

(Varieones, &c.) 29 

Thornton & Ross, Ltd. (Ginger Wine 

Essence) xvi 

Thurley, G. E., & Son (Liquid Paraffin) vi 

Tokalon, Ltd. (New Lipstick) 12 

Tomlin-^on, T., & Son (Valuers, &c.) 

Col. Supp. 

Town Talk Polish Co. (Liquid Silver 

Polish) xvii 

Tragasol Products, Ltd. (Toilet Cream) 26 

Viscose Development Co., Ltd. (Vis- 
kaps Bottle Capsules) xx 

Wagner, R. V. (Bottle Caps) xviii 

Waide, Thos., & Sons, Ltd. (Printing) 30 

Warner, W. R., & Co., Ltd. (Sloans 
Brand Liniment) x 

Westminster College of Pharmacy 

Leader Page 

Whitten & Rons, Ltd. (Extract of 
Ipecac. Liq.) v 

Wilcox, Jozeau & Co. (Vionase) 

Leader Page 

Wilson & Manslield, Ltd. (Eucalyptus 
Oil) XV 

Wood Bros. Glass Co., Ltd. (Glass- 
ware) xviii 

W'ooldridge .Medicine Co., Ltd. (Yesta- 
min) 32 

AVooUey, J., & Sons & Co., Ltd. (Phar- 
maceuticals, &c.) 8 

Zimmeriiiaiiu, A M. (Chemicals) vi 



I STOCKS IN LONDON | 

I CAUSTIC POTASH | 

P (STICKS • PELLETS - TLAKES) | 

I THYMOL Cryst.B.P. | 

i TERPINOL TERPINEOL | 

I MENTHOL Synthetic Recryst. | 

i I 

4;,,^ 188/192 HIGH HOLBORN, ^-^^^^ t^^^^C^^^ ^^4'' ' * LONDON. W. C . 

Telephone -Hoi born 934-5 ^^^AVNw,. LI^^'TED Telegrams: Schfcroph a, |^S>., 
^ (4- lines) ^~^^^NsNNvxNNxxxx..x^^^^^^^^^^ ^ Ph otie . Lo M don . 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



7 



A Biological Remedy : In Tablet Form 

for Veins, Arteries and Heart 





A LIVELY DEMAND EVERYWHERE FOSTERED 
BY CONSISTENT ADVERTISING 



STILL MORE EXTENSIVE 
ADVERTISING NOW 
BEING PLANNED 

' Obtainable through your Wholesale 
House. Further particulars, show- 
cards, &c., irom the proprietors. 



Day by day — year by year^people throughout the country see.- 
Elasio advertising. Every week shows bigger sales. Thousands of i 
chemists, realising that" Elaslo, is a non-competitive line are recom- j 
mending this highly siiccessfiir product to all customers suffering] 
from Varicose Veins, Bad Leg and all circulatory disorders, and.i 
doing a brisk repeat busir^ess. Our large scale advertising will move i 
your stock with greater speed if you will show Elasto on your counter i 
or in your window. Take your share of this better class trade now 1; 

SHOW ELASTO — IT SELLS ON S I G H T ! i 




RETAIL 5/. PER BOX 

(One Month's Supply) 



WHOLESALE 45/- A DOZ. P.A.T.A. 



The new ERA TREATMENT Co. Ltd., 

(DEPT. CD.), CECIL HOUSE, HOLBORN VIADUCT, LONDON, E.C.I 



8 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



October 5, 1935 



• FOR ALL 

PHARMACEUTICAL 
SURGICAL AND 
PHOTOGRAPHIC 
REQUIREMENTS 



Your enquiries 
are invited 



JAMES WOOLLEY SONS & CO. LTD. 

VICTORIA BRIDGE, MANCHESTER 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



9 




OurPrMsCdmpdign 



Now appearing in 

DAILY MAIL 
DAILY EXPRESS 
DAILY HERALD 
NEWS CHRONICLE 
DAILY SKETCH 
DAILY MIRROR 
DAILY TELEGRAPH 
TIMES 



70% 

PROFIT ON 

OUTLAY 



ATA jl/ijl^ 





Through the medium of these great daily news- 
papers an interest in this wonderful All-British 
series of products will be created in millions of 
homes. Last year emphatically proved that 
Crookes' Oil has come to stay. Do not waste 
time therefore — take advantage at once of the 
generous bonus terms offered. Full particulars 
will be gladly forwarded upon request. 

CROOKES' 

PURE HALIBUT LIVER 



COLLOSOL 



OIL 



T.G.S. 



THE CROOKES LABORATORIES 

(Briti-li ColloiiK Ltd.) 

PARK ROYAL, LONDON, N.W.10 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



October 5, 1935 




BUT 

BUflNEfS AS 



USUAL 



ALL OLD and NEW CUSTOMERS 

can depend upon us even under such terrible difficulties of 
FIRE giving them the usual SERVICE and QUALITY of 
WORKMANSHIP. 

Nearly sixty years of business friendship have we enjoyed 

with the DRUG AND ALLIED TRADES and now 

FIRE INTERVENES. 

This accident will not deter us from our usual 

BUSINESS ROUTINE 

SEND US YOUR NEXT ENQUIRY! 
CHEMISTS' AND ADVERTISING PRINTERS 



BURLEY ROAD, LEEDS, 4 



Telephone : 
Headingley 519/4 

LONDON OFFIOE: SENTINEL HOUSE, SOUTHAMPTON ROW, W.C. 1 



Telegrams : 
" Ideas. " Leeds 

Telephone ; Holborn 9200 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 




MAW CHRrSTMAS 
MERCHANDISE IS 
BREAKING ALL RECORDS 



*Maw has recently released THE GREATEST RANGE 
OF CHRISTMAS MERCHANDISE ever known. Its 
success at the hands of the trade has been instantaneous. 
Early reports indicate that our customers are co- 
operating with us on a larger scale than ever before. 

This sparkling program is described in the 1935 
Maw Christmas List with its gleaming aluminium 
cover, and its 40 pages of modern merchandise. Cus- 
tomers say it is the finest Xmas list ever published ! 

It will pay you more than ever before to visit the 
recently extended Maw Showrooms at Aldersgate 
Street, which have now been redecorated in the 
modern manner. You are assured of a hearty welcome. 

Maw is staging special exhibitions of this record-breaking 
range in most cities in the British Isles. Don't fa I 
to see the Maw representative when he is next in 
your locality. 

*A FEW HIGH SPOTS 
FROM THE NEW PROGRAM 



MERITOR CHRISTMAS TOILET 

BRUSHWARE 
MERITOR MATCHED BRUSH GIFT 

SETS 

MERITOR ZIPPER TRAVEL TOILET 
KITS 

MERITOR AND NUSTYLE TOILET 

PREPARATIONS 
MAW MATCHED GIFTTOILET KITS 
MAW VANITOR 1935 FASHION 

PUFFS 



MAW WALT DISNEY T.B. HOL- 
DERS AND T.B's. 

MAW WALT DISNEY HOT 
WATER BOTTLES 

MAW VANITY COMPACTS, 
ENAMEL AND CHROMIUM 

MAW ENAMEL AND CHROMIUM 
TOILET GOODS 

MAW 1935 TOILET GLASS 

MAW MANICURE MERCHANDISE 



THE BIG SWING IS TO MAW • 1935 SUNDRIES LEADER 



ADVERTISEMENT 
OF REPUTE 



OF S , 



MAW, SON & SONS LTD.. SUNDRIES CREATORS 
7-12 ALDERSGATE STREET. LONDON, E.C.I 



12 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



October 5, 1935 




TOKALON 

LIPSTICK 



In the following 
shades : 

SCARLET 
DARK RED 
LIGHT RED 
ORANGE 



ROUGE 



Two easy''selling 
lines that show 
a large profit to the retailer. 
Easy to display, requiring the 
minimum of counter room. 
The tones are true to name, 
and are in complete harmony 
with the modern trend. 

Write for Trade Terms. 

TOKALON LT? CHASE RP LONDON, N.W.IO 



fn the following 
shades : 

BRUNETTE 
BLONDE 
MANDARIN 
RASPBERRY 




5/- worth of goods FREE! 

. . . WITH EVERY 20/- ORDER . . . PROFIT 43% ON SELLING! 



Glazo supply the perfect 
manicure preparations — 
at the right price ! You 
can recommend these 
products with confidence 
— particularly to cus- 
tomers experiencing the 
difficulties of nail-brittle- 
ness, dry cuticle and other 
troubles arising from the 
use of harsh and unsuitable 
polishes and removers. 



SPECIAL £1 OFFER 

Su,,estM Assortment ^^^Z'" 
I doz. i/3 Liquid 
Polish { I o 
Shades) - 
\ doz. 1/3 Oily 
Pohsh Remover 
\ doz. 1/3 Cuticle 
Remover - 



lo/- 
5/- 



5/- 

20/- 

FREE BONUS 

Four only 1/3 Liquid Polish 
(and shade), 5/-. 

Therefore on a 20/- parcel vou arc 
getting 5/- WORTH FREE in 
addition to usual wholesale discount 
of 33J%. 



GLAZO IS NATIONALLY ADVERTISED 



GXAZO 



Illustrated Price List gladly sent on application to EUCRYL LTD., 
Southampton — Sole distributors for Glazo Lid. to wholesale 
and retail chemists trade. 




FREE DISPLAY STAND sent with all Bonus 
Orders. A wonderful " silent demonstrator " and 
great sales producer ... * 



October 5. 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



13 




LOWEST PRICES 



FULL 5 GRAIN 



8° per d o z . 
GLASS. TUBES 
OF 10 TABLETS 
PACKED 3 DOZ. 
IN DISPLAY BOX 



spirin 

ENGLAND 

STANDARD 

bottles 
Tablets 
bottles 
Tablets 
bottles 
150 Tablets 

PACKED 1 DOZ. IN DISPLAY BOX 




WHY P AY M O R E o 
ORDER TODAY FROM YOUR WHOLESALER 

WHOLESALE HOUSES ONLY S U PP L I E D , D I R EOT BY TH E PROPRI ETORS OF 
HAX AND ANTI-THRAX PRODUCTS EDWARD HACK LTD., 73 TO 78 A 
9 HIGH HOLBORN, LONDON, W.C.I. HOLBORN: 1000, 6000, 9000 




No. C.D.F. S278 
MODERNISTIC 
DISPLAY STAND 

Suitable (or high-class dis- 
play. Chromium Plated 
throughout. Complete with 
2 Black Shelves. Height I2ins. 
Size of Shelves 9 5 ins. 

12/- each. 



No. C.D.F. 5513 
, INVISIBLE UNIT 
Il-J^ DISPLAY STAND 

Of very attractive 
appearance. Centre 
glass is 18x8 Ins. and 
is fitted with five 8 in. 
circles and two bow- 
front shelves, size 
15x5 ins. Complete 
with Chromium Plated 
clips and base. 

23/* complete. 



Send for our Catalogues Nos, CD iGoo CD 1615. 
DUDLEY & COMPANY, Limited 

4.51 Holloway Rd., London, N.7. 'Phone: Archwpy 1616, 
City Showrooms: 65 FORE STREET, E.C.2 



GARDINER & CO. r>^'") LTD. 

I, 3, 5 Commercial Rd., London, E.I 

Phone : BIShopsgata 6751 

PROTECTIVE CLOTHING 

of Every Kind ; Moderate Prices 

Garments well tailored 

COATS. Long (a$ illus.) White 
Drill. S/II. 7/«, 9/6, 12/6. 
Khaki. 5/11. 6/11. 8/6, 9/6, 
13/6. Grex. 7/6, 9/6. 11/6. 
Black, 14/6. 

JACKETS. White Drill, 4/6, 5/6. 
7/11. Grey. 6/11. Khaki. 7/6. 
9/11. Black Poplin. 13/6. 

DENTISTS' COATS. Button on 
Shoulder. Three-Quartor length. 
Fine White Drill, 12/6, 14/6. 
16/6. 

LADIES' COATS. Crossover 
Style, with belt. Whit*. 5/11. 
7/11.10/6. Khaki, 8/11. Coat 
style, with belt. White, 8/11, 
10/6. 12/6. Any colour or 
design to order. Patterns and illus- 
trated price list on application. 

Special Prices lor Quantities 

Special attention to Post Orders. 
State Chest Measure and height. 
Orders for 20/- post free. Cash 
refunded if not approved. If not 
A/C, goods sent C.O.D. or on 
approved reference. 

Branches throughout London 




14 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



October 5, 1935 




Best To*>»' 




When a product is as successful as 
Anzora it is only to be expected that 
imitations will make a temporary 
appearance. But only the best is good 
enough for most men — and so Anzora 
still continues to lead the way in sales. 
Rely on Anzora — the hair fixative that 
has become a household word — and that 
will keepalways ahead of all competition, 
through its superior merit and consis- 
tent advertising. ShowCardson request. 

THE GOLD MEDAL HAIR CREAM 



TRADE TERMS 

ANZORA CREAM and ANZORA BRILLIANTINE 



VIOLA 

9d. size ... «/- per doz. 
I/J size ... 10/- per doz. 
J/3 size ... 18/- per doz. 



I/- bottle ... 8/- per doz. 
ANZORA WAVE SETTING LOTION 

6d. size ... 4/- per doz. 
1/3 size ... • I/- per doz. 



ANZOgA 

MASTERS THE HAIR 



ANZORA PERFUMERY CO., LTD.. LONDON, N.W.6 




get rich 
quick? 



No wonder the 
vSouth Sea Bubble 
burst over England. 
No wonder there is 
such a thing as the 
Lotteries Act. We 
all prefer to become 
millionaires over- 
night rather than 
acquire oiu- wealth 
slowly and steadily. 

The sober fact 
remains — a solid 

|oundation to one's business is worth all the glitter- 
ing get-rich -quick schemes. Take, for example, 
the Harriet Hubbard Ayer preparations. They are 
preparations of extreme purity, each with a clear-cut 
task in the care of the skin. But no miracles are 
promised to women. No fortunes are prophesied to 
you who sell them. 

In .spite of this unusual modesty, the increase in the 
sales of Harriet Hubbard Ayer preparations is very 
big. Those who stock them find their turnover grows 
a little larger every day. Those who use them find 
that their skin really is responding to this sensible and 
honest treatment. 

And, although personal recommendation is pro- 
bably our greatest asset, please remember that ovir 
advertising acts as a gentle, gracious reminder all the 
year round. 



BY LILLIAN S. DODGE 

President of 

HARRIET HUBBARD AYER LTD. 

Beauti/ preparations 
® 

130 Regent Street London Wl 



>EW YORK 



PARIS 



MONTREAL 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



15 



DTRECTORS : 



TELEPHONE: LANGHAM 2452/3. 

TELEGRAMS: STABLOND, WESDO, LONDON. 
Cablegrams : STABLOND-LONDON 



P. F. M. HUNGER (general Manager , 
A. H. MANSELL. 



R. MILLETT. 



STABLOND LABORATORIES LTD. 



Factory and Warehouse 



Registered Office : 



ACTON LANE, 



10 HENRIETTA STREET, 

CAVENDISH SQUARE, 



HARLESDEN. 



LONDON, N.W.10. 



Telephone : 



LONDON, W. 1. 



WILlesden 1185. 



Dear- Sirs, 

The Manufacturers of Stablond (The StalDlond Laboratories 
Ltd,,) and Vikelp (The Health Products Laboratories Ltd.,) 
desire to concentrate their working arrangements, and have 
decided to centralise the distribution of their products. 

To effect this in the interests of the parties concerned, 
it has been foxind necessary to transfer the distribution of 
Stablond Shampoos to Messrs. J.C. Gambles & Co. ,Ltd. , as from 
October 1st, 1935; thus the distribution will be carried out 
by them in conjunction with Vikelp. 

The Directors wish to place on record their appreciation 
of the service rendered by their late Distributors , Messrs . 
Passett & Johnson, and to state that the change now made is 
simply to effect a concentration and economy in handling without 
prejudicing the esteem of Messrs. Fassett cS: Johnson. 

Will you kindly note in your records that orders for 
Stablond Shampoos should, after October 1st, be sent to 
J.C. GAMBLES & CO. LTD., 211/215» BlackJi:»iar s Road, London, S.E.1. 



HEALTH P] 




Secretary, 



16 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



October 5. 1935 



EVERYMAN will use tt . . . 



PRIZES FOR YOU 



Window Displa 
Competition 
1st Prize £30 
2nd Prize £20 
3rd Prize £10 
and 50 £5 prizes 

The above prizes 
retailers who su 




SOLE DISTRIBUTORS- FASSETT & JOHNSON LTD 



CLERKFNWELI 



ROAD 



LONDON 





WAN IE 



8/- CROSS 



The Blade for Every Razor! 

Send for Samples to Dept. CD. 

LONDON & PROVINCIAL 
FACTORS, LTD. 

146 THEOBALDS ROAD, W.C.I 

and at 

16 WITHY GROVE, MANCHESTER 

tnqutries from Irish Free State invited 
Wholesalers are invited Co apply for Trade Terms i 



TIM 



tLEO« I 
HZDR BLSSE 



October 5. 1935 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 17 



MAY & BAKER ltd 

have pleasure in informing their friends in 
the Pharmaceutical Profession and Trade 
that from 1st October I93S their business in 
Pharmaceutical Specialities will be conducted by 

PHARMACEUTICAL SPECIALITIES 
(MAY & BAKER) LIMITED 

The formation of this company has become necessary in view 
of the expansion of this branch of the business. 
It is hoped that the valued support hitherto given to 
May & Baker Ltd. will be extended to the new Company. 

Pharmaceutical Specialities (May & Baker) Limited 
OFFICES & LABORATORIES 

DAGENHAM 



Telegraphic Address : 

Bismuth, Phone, London 



Telephones : 

ilford 3060 (10 lines) 



18 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



October 5. 1935 



I Te'legraiiihlcAddrees: 
Bismuth. Phone. London. 



Te le pho n. e a *. I 

Ilfopd 3060 (IGLifxes), 



Pharmaceutical Specialities ( May & Baker) Ltd. 



Code a : 



A.B.C. 6t^ Bentleys & Moaae'a. 



Directors: 
W.G.Hytle, 
N.C.BlenUinsop. 
J.M.Fiaher. 

T-B Maxwell. (American), 




Offices & Labor-atorlee: 

Dagenham, 



GENERAL PRODUCTS 



ACRIFLAVINE 

ADRENALINE 

FORMADERMINE 

GONACRINE 

NEPTAL 

PLANCRINE 

PLANOCHROME 

PROPIDEX 



STELLIDIN 
URAZINE 

ZEPHROL (a) Cough Syrup 

(b) Nasaljelly 

(c) Nasal Spray 
EPHEDRINE (a) Tablets 

(b) Ampoules 



V.D. PREPARATIONS 



NOVARSENOBILLON 
METARSENOBILLON 
ACETYLARSAN 
TRYPARSAMIDE 



BIARSAMIDE 
RUBYL 
BISGLUCOL 
NEO-CARDYL 



HYPNOTICS SEDATIVES 
GARDENAL, SONALGIN. SONERYL, THEOGARDENAL 

X RAY PRODUCTS 
NEO-HYDRIOL OPACOL DIAGNOTHORINE 

GOLD PREPARATIONS 
CRISALBINE MYOCRISIN 



AN/ESTHETICS 

CHLOROFORM Anaesthetic "Baker's" 
ETHER 

PLANACAINE DURACAINE STOVAINE 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



19 



Make the Most of this Opportunity 






JELLY 

1935 
Window Display 

BONUS PARCELS 

7 Assortments Available. 

Still greater Advertising will 
appear this season. 

Tubes 3d., 6d.5 i/- 
Decorative Jars 2/6 



Send your Orders NOW 



So/e Wholesale Agents 



Telephone 

MUSEUM 
5440 



258 Eus±on Rd., London, N.W.I 



Pronrietors 

Osbourne, Bauer & 

Cheeseman. Ltd., 
42 Hampstead Road, 
London, N.W.I 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST October 5. 1935 





HANDKERCHIEFS 

Soft as silk — healthy and 
save washing. Packed in two 
forms, plain or antiseptic. 

PRICES 

Qd. Packets of 15 plain O O / 



^ . „. „ 12 anHsepric -^^Z "packets 

✓ d Packets of 30 plain AAl 
O „ „ 24 antiseptic ^0/-p3;°';,^ 



SOUTHALLS (BIRMINGHAM) LTD. 

CHARFORD MILLS, SALTLEY, BIRMINGHAM, 8 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



21 



Messrs. STOWER & DUBINSKI 

43 MARYLEBONE LANE. LONDON, W. 1 Welbeck 6U1 

Sole Agents for the United Kingdom and I.F.S. for 

FORVIL 

RUE DE CASTIGLIONE 
PARIS FRANCE 

Announce to the Wholesale and Retail Chemists th,it they have entered into an 
agreement with Messrs. 

THOS. CHRISTY & CO. LTD. 

4-12, OLD SWAN LANE, LONDON, E.C. A • Mansion House 9931 

to act as their SOLE DISTRIBUTORS to the CHEMIST TRADE in the UNITED 
KINGDOM and I.F.S. for the WORLD FAMOUS 

FORVIL PARFUMS 

"5 FLEURS" "LES ANEMONES" 

and the FORVIL Eau-de-Colognes, Hair O'ls and Hair Lotions. 

All FORVIL PERFUMES, etc., give the RETAIL CHEMIST a 



MINIMUM PROFIT of - - 




- on SELLING PRICES 



# Retail prices of FORVIL Perfumes range from 1/9 to 29/- 

# Superb display material and free samples with opening orders. 

# Special discounts on quantity lots. 

Messrs. CHRISTY'S representative will visit you shortly to bring these magnificent 
lines to your notice. 



All orders for FORVIL Perfumes, Eau-de-Colognes, Hair Oils and Lotions should 
please be sent direct to Messrs. Thos. Christy & Co. Ltd. as and from this date. 



STOWER & DUBINSKI 

Sole Agents of 

FORVIL, PARIS AMBASSADE. PARIS 

FOR U.K. AND I.F.S. FOR THE BRITISH EMPIRE 

43 MARYLEBONE LANE, LONDON, W.I Welbeck 6141 



22 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



October 5, 1935 





Pearl, Clear 
and Opal — 
200-260 volts 

AO watts 
60 waHs 
75 watts 
100 watts 
at the same 
prices as ordinary 
Sasfilled lamps. 



GASFILLED 

COILED-COIL 

LAMPS 
WITH THE WONDERFUL 
NON.SAG FILAMENT 

which produce up to 20% 
more light with no extra 
cost for lamp or current. 





MADE IN ENGLAND BY 
THE BRITISH THOMSON-HOUSTON CO., LTD. 



'""ADE MARX- 

"EilSy SET" 

the Clinical with the highest reputation 

Accoson "Easy Set " arc the most scientifically 
accurate thermometers made. Patented 
over 30 years ago, they are still the 
finest thermometers obtainable and are 
chosen by all discriminating Doctors 

*No trouble in shaking down 

* Clear reading 

* Lifetime Accuracy 

When next ordering Clini cals as k your 
_ Wholesale House to supply ^^^]J> made 

Customers name engraved on back 
of thermometers at no extra cost 

NOW SUPPLIED IN INDIVIDUAL CARTONS 



Obl<m.bl< l,om ill lt,Jm, Wkoltult Hou> 



ACCOSSOR&SON (THERMOMETERS) L_ 

ACCOSON WORKS VALE ROAD 
FINSBURY PARK ■ LONDON, N.& 



An invaluable protection 
after Sprains or Fractures 



WRIST SUPPORT 

Patent No. 410258 




Essential for use after the removal of splints. 
Popular with all sportsmen and sportswomen • 
for its economy and reliability. \_ 

PRICE 9^ EACH ^ 

Stocked in Natural, Flesh and Tan, by all leading Wholesalers. 
Sole Manufacturers : GROUT ft CO. LTD., London, E.C. 2 



Advertised from January to 
December and never fails 
to give satisfactiotl. Also 
SU-CAN Soluble for instant 
disposal. 




From your Wholesale House, please. 



ROBINSON E SONS LTD. CHESTERFIELD eLONDON 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST 



AND DRUGGIST 



23 



BARTLETT'S 

HAPPY FEET BRAND 

IODINE SOCKS 

6' 



PER PAIR 



BARTLETT IODIZED 
FOOT POWDER 

Specially compounded to keep 
Socks fully Iodine charged. Sup- 
plied in Sprinkler containers 6d* 
e-ch. 4/- per doz. 



OBTAINABLE FROM ALL WHOLESALERS 

BARTLETT DISTRIBUTING COMPANY 

DIAMOND HOUSE: 
37 HATTON GARDEN, E.C.I 



E REGISTERED 



J^Uance 



TRADE MARK 



SEAMLESS MOULDED 

HOT WATER BOTTLES 

ARE MADE IN LONDON 

BY THE FINEST SPECIALISED 
PLANT IN THE WORLD 

AND SOLD THE WORLD OVER 
RELIANCE RUBBER COMPANY LTD. 

CREMOHNE WORKS, LOTS ROAD, LONDON, S.W.10 



SOUTHALLS 

SANITARY TOWELS 



All the year round publicity, 
appearing in virtually every news- 
paper and magazine read by 
women, ensures steady sales to 
the dealer who stocks Southall's 
products. 

The "ORIGINAL" and most 
popular. 

The "CELTEX" soluble, easily 
disposed of. 

The "K" made entirely of absorbent 
cotton wool, with very soft cover. 
The -COMPRESSED" for travel- 
ling. A very popular line. 




ORDER 
NOW 



THE 

"GOOD NIGHT" 



HOT WATER BOTTLE 




COVER 



SO SEASONABLE — SO 
DIFFERENT — Makes a splendid 
and topical window display — 
pulls customers — and satisfies 
them ! Feature the " Good 
Night" cover now and know how 
profitable the line can be. 
"Good Night" covers are made 
of high-grade soft fleecy cloth in 
art colours, with the novel candle- 
stick design woven in the cloth. 
Made to fit the standard 12x8 
bottles. 



BRITISH MADE 



Registered f 
Design S 




PRICE 

8/- 

dozen 



Obtainable from leading wholesalers 

SPENCER BROS. 

(C. J. SPENCER LTD.) 

Manufacturers of Toilet Sundries 
66 & 67 SHOE LANE, LONDON, E.C.4 

Telephone : Central 480! (Private Exchange) 



24 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



October 5. 1935 





PEARLo OPAL 

ELECTRIC LAMPS 

WITH COILED-COIL FILAMENTS 
GIVE UP TO 



0% MORE LIGHT 



AT NO EXTRA COST 

OBTAINABLE WHEREVER ELECTRIC LAMPS ARE SOLO 




THE PO^V^ 



Cdwr^ SIEMENS ELECTRIC LAMPS AND SUPPLIES LIMITED. 38/39.Upper Thames Street, London. E C-4 





StockecJ in both designs for 
Epsom and Glauber Salts in 
chocolate, blue and green 
on white, with your name 
and address. 

To hold 4 oz. and 8 oz. 




PARCHMENT BAGS TO FIT. 



PACKED DRUGS MEAN QUICK SERVICE 
QUICK SERVICE MEANS GOOD RETURNS 

S & S PRINTED CARTON'S WILL HELP YOU TO INCREASE YOUR SALES 

Write for samples and prices — ■ 

SUTTLEY & SILVERLOCK LTD. 

LABEL DEPARTMENT 

ANDOVER - HANTS 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



25 



In the High Court of Justice 

CHANCERY DIVISION 

before Mr. Justice Luxmoore 

Messrs. Newton, Chambers & Co., Ltd. claimed an injunction to 
restrain the Neptune Waterproof Paper Co., Ltd. from infringing plaintijfs^ 
trade-mark IZAL. Plaintiffs alleged that defendants had manufactured a roll 
w hich they had marked " Medicated with IZAL " and plaintiffs claimed that 
their trade-mark IZAL was infringed. The defence of the Neptune Waterproof 
Paper Co., Ltd. was that they had used the plaintiffs' IZAL disinfectant to 
medicate their rolls and that they were entitled to use the wording complained 
of. Mr. Justice Luxmoore granted Messrs. Newton, Chambers & Co., Ltd. an 
injunction restraining the Neptune Waterproof Paper Co., Ltd. from infringing 
the trade-mark IZAL and ordered an enquiry as to d.Jiiages and ordered 
defendants to pay plaintiffs" costs. 



THIS IS OF INTEREST TO THE PUBLIC 

who require a toilet paper that is efficiently medicated and place an increasing 
confidence in IZAL medicated toilet rolls or packs 

THIS IS OF INTEREST TO THE TRADER 

who stocks IZAL medicated toilet paper to meet an ever increasing demand 

THIS IS OF INTEREST TO TRADE-MARK PROPRIETORS GENERALLY 

who will welcome a definite pronouncement which will help them to protect 
their rights 

Messrs. Newton, Chambers & Co., Ltd. are advised that to protect their own interests 
they should take action against any unauthorised use of their trade-mark and have 
consistently warned manufacturers accordingly. 

The word IZAL is the registered trade-mark of Messrs. Newton, Chambers & Co., Ltd., 
Thorncliffe, Nr. Sheffield, who are the sole proprietors of IZAL medicated toilet paper. 



26 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



October 5. 1935 




IN BULK OR 
READY PACKED 
IN li OZ. & 8 OZ. POTS 



A DELIGHTFUL TOILET CREAM 



UNDER YOUR OWN NAME ! 



"Ceraton" is a new "all-purposes" non-greasy, antiseptic toilet 
cream made from an entirely new base. It is supplied either in bulk 
(Perfumed or unperfurred) for re-packing, or in dainty glass jars, 
\l OZ or 8 oz., under *' Ceraton " label or blank for chemist's 
own name. Prices and sample jar free on request. 
TRACASOL PRODUCTS Ltd., HOOTON, WIRRAL, Cheshire 



"VITAMIN TESTED YEAST" 

Yeast specially prepared for medicinal purposes 

GUARANTEED ABSOLUTELY PURE 

MIDGL-EY & PARKINSON, UTD. 

WsLfi-en Woi-Us, Pudsey, UEEDS 



URICURE TABLETS 

Gre atest of all Rheu matic Rem edies 

I 3siZE.7rOOZ 3I'SIZE ■SIZE 

THE ACTON PILL & TABLET C9 LTD ASH VALE GURRE"! 



*DOMCO' (Read) 



MALT & COD LIVER OIL AND 
MALT & HALIBUT LIVER OIL 

are exceptionally palatable preparations 

carrying a good profit margin 

Both these quality products are supplied in I, 2, & 7 lb. jars indi- 
vidually wrapped, or in 1 lb. containers for N.H. L purposes. 
Qtwiations from — 

D. IVIAWDSLEY & CO. ^ * ^ '''aANCHESTEl''"''"''*''' 



POOI-TRY DISEASES// 

Thousands of Poultry Fanners use CHLOROZONE and The 
PUTNAM GIZZARD CAPSULES at least once a year. 
Ab'e you supplying them? 

CHLOROZONE. The internal disinfectant. 
PUTNAM GIZZARD CAPSULES for worms !n poultry. 
Direct or from your wholesaler. 

Write for pMication" FARMING LIVE STOCK," post free. 
PUTNAM'S DEPENDABLE SERVICE, Northam, Devon. 



INCREASE YOUR DEVELOPING 
AND PRINTING SERVICE ! 

MAKE USE OF OUR REALLY USEFUL SERIES. OF 
p. m P. BOOKS. ALSO OUR PRINTED AIDS TO SELLING 

INTERESTING RANGE OF SAMPLES POST FREE.. 

BURALL BROS., WISBECH, Cambi.j 




SHADEINE 

FOR TINTING GREY HAIR 



riii'i tiopular artii le is laifrely ad 
and stoclced b.v all \\ liolesalc 

Trial size Sd per doz 

1/4 size, per doz 

2/6 size, per doz 

3/;i size, per doz. 



eri iseil 
ses. 
6;- 
12/- 



36/- 



The SHADEKOECo., 49 Churchfield Road, Acton,_W^ 



VITA 
COLOUR 
RINSES 



enhance the Colour and Brilliance of the Hair. 
A Popular Line at a Popular Price. 
Retail 2 for 6d. IN 12 SHADES. Not a Dye 

Stocked by your usual wholesalers 



SMGLISH OIL OF CAMOMIE.E 

(OL. ANTHEMIDIS) 

From Plants Grown on My Own Farm 
Also ENGLISH CAMOMILE FLOWERS 

(ANTHEMIS N03ILIS) 
LARGEST aaOWBB l\ E\GLA.\D 

R. W. B. ST/^RKS 

THK OHC8TNUT8 FARM, EYE, SUFFOLK 



^AUTOMATIC WEIGHING 

* PACKING MACHINE CO. 

Prop. -^ Arthur R. Smith (23 fears Southall Sc Smith Ltd.) 



Invite your enquiries for machines to weigh or .... 
Powdered or Granular Materials, Seidlltz Powders, 
Face Powders, Epsom Salts, etc. Repairs, Overhauls 
and Spares for any make or type of Machine, 



22 CAROLINE ST., BIRMINGHAM 

'Phone: Central 1069. 'Crams: Autoback, Birmlntham. 



Eau de Cologne . . . Lavender Water 

ALL TOILET PREPARATIONS 

Low, Son C> Haydon, Limited 



5 QT. QUEEN ST., LONDON, W.C.2 

TELEPHONE : HOLBORN 4007 EST. 1790 



COURT 
PERFUMERS 



We shall welcome your enquiries for 

SHAVING CREAMS % 

POMADE HONGROiSE 
% POWDERED SOAP 

SHAMPOO POWDERS 

A. GIDLOW & CO. LEVE°N^HiLMl; MANCHESTER 

Telephone No.: Rusholme 2676 



F. MAUND & E. BERG (SHOWCASES) Ltd. 

SHOPFITTERS & SHOPFRONT BUILDERS 
175/9 OLD STREET, I.ONDON, E.C.I 

Telephone : Clerkenweli 1782 3 

are offering for sab, at compelitive prices, 
an extensive and exceptionally full range of 
Chemists' Fillings, Second-hand and New. 



CONTRACEPTIVES 

We have been supplying Contraceptives of all kinds now for over 
30 years and our well-known Safeguard & Empire Brands are 
still as popular as ever. THESE FACTS SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES 
and prove the confidence we have secured which is the 
fundamental principle in selling these goods. 

All our Brands are guaranteed to be of the finest manufacture. 
Write for complete Price List and Samples. 
BUROE, WARREN & RIDQLEY, LTD. 
91-92 Great Saffron Hill, London, E.C.I 



HOW IS YOUR STOCK OF 

ESTIVIN 

HAY FEVER REMEDY? 

SHOW CARD SUPPLIED FREE. 
T. CHRISTY & CO. LTD., OLD SWAN LANE, E.C.4 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



27 




BRITAIN'S 
MANUFACTURING 
RESOURCES 

were advertised to 
the world's markets 
through her greatest 
engineering achieve- 
ment. 



Individual manufacturers can reach those markets 
as effectively through the columns of the " News of 
the World." 

THERE ARE 3 MAJOR POINTS:— 

2. "The Sunday press is a complete sales campaign 
in itself, unrivalled because ihe reader is at leisure 
to study and respond to the advertisements " says 
the " Advertiser's Weekly." 

2. Readers of Sunday newspapers comprise one in 
three of the population. 

3, The " News of the World," with its sale exceeding 
3,350,000, covers nearly 25% of them every issue. 

The far-seeing merchant contemplating sales extension through advertising 
cannot secure a more complete appeal at a more economical rate (less than Id. 
per single column inch per i,ooo copies) than through the 



The most powerful sales medium in advertising 
30 BOUVERIE ST., LONDON, EX. 





SALES LARGELY EXCEED 3,350,000 COPIES PER BSSUE 



28 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



October 5, 1935 




WIDE ANGLE 



PANTO OCTAGON 



OCTAGON 



With the advent of the social season people are on the look-out for 
something smart for the Theatre, for their Card Game, etc. Our winter 
stocks are now complete with all the newest in frames and lenses. Our 
arrangements are complete for a prompt and efficient Rx service. 

OUR CATALOGUE OF FRAAIES AND OUR FULLY DETAILED 
LISTS OF LENSES FOR Rx SERJ^ICE FREE ON APPLICATION. 

JOHN BAIRD & SONS, Wholesale <& Manufacturing Opticians, 

Teleplione & Extensions .• CENTRAL s+r 

Telegrams & Cables : SPECTACLES, GLASGOW (A.B.C. CODE) 

ESTABLISHED 1889 



70 MITCHELL STREET, 

GLASGOW, C. 1 



NATIONALLY & LOCALLY 



ADVERTISED 




FOR 

RHEUMATISM 
SCIATICA 
NEURITIS 



>^EDICIMAL PEAT 

ASK 

YOUR WHOLESALER 

FOR PARTICULARS 

If any diffiniltv in obtain-nfi supplies 
« rit.' iliiect (t;iviiiK ame of wliolesal.Tl 



ARTHRITIS, Etc. 



SCOTTISH PEAT COMPOUND 

& CHEMICAL CO. LTD. 
Ellesmere St., MANCHESTER, 15 



THE LARGEST CHIROPODY 
SCHOOL IN EUROPE 

The f>latio,ial School of ChironOdy gives a most compre 
hensive training In both theory and practice. Lectures 
are given by medical men experienced in teacliing lay 
students and each student mu = t traat over 600 cases 
under supervision The full intensive cou se extends 
over a period of six months; the fees are very reasonable. 
Enterprising Chemists who have opened Chiropody 
Departments are able 

1 St. — To give bettei'servic^ with scientific foot t reatment 
2nd — To widen the scope of their service, and attract 

new customers 
3rd. — To gain added confidence from both customi<rs 
and doctors 

4th. — To augment income from Chiropody Fees and 
additional specialities. 

Write for free l.:-page prospfctux lo the Secrelani. 

NATIONAL SCHOOL OF CHIROPODY 

{De/il :iu). 133 Upper Street, Islingrton, London, N.I 



OPTICAL TUITION 

FOR THE 

S.M.C., B.O.A. and N.A.O. DIPLOMA Examinations 

Particulars : — 

C. A. SGURR, F.S.M.C, F.B.O.A., F.N.A.O., F.I.O,, F.C.O., MPS. 

50 HK;H STREET. BARNET. LONDON, N. 



F O Y L E S 

LIBRARIES 

A profitable sideline for Chemists. Full 
particulars from Foyles Libraries Ltd. 
Trefoile House, Manette St., Charing Cross Rd., London, W.C.2 



TO GET 

INTO DIRECT TOUCH 

with the best buyers of Drugs, 
Chemicals, and allied products 

ALL OVER THE WORLD 

use regularly the publicity 
service afforded by 

THE CHEMIST & DRUGGIST 



■* 
■* 
■* 
■* 
■* 
■* 
< 

< 
< 

■* 
■* 
■* 
< 
■* 

■* 



October 5. 1935 



THE CHEMIST 



AND DRUGGIST 



29 




HAND TABLET 
MACHINE 



This nev/ hand tablet machine is a small 
machine which will be found particularly 
useful in any manufacturing department 
— for making special batches of tablets 
— or for experimental purposes. 

Inexpensive, yet strongly built, it has 
all the latest improvements embodied, 
and it is an invaluable machine to 
pharmacists in business who wish to 
make their own special tablets. 



Its main features are 



1. Great simplicity in 
working. 

2. Automatic action 
and nothing to get 
out of order. 

3. Output about 100 
tablets per minute. 

4. Perfect accuracy. 

5. Can be cleaned 
thoroughly in a 
few minutes. 

6. No waste or loss 
of material. 

7. All parts inter- 
changeable. 

8. Makes tablets up 
to .', in. diameter. 



PRICE £15 net 
Carriage paid in Great Britain 
— case and packing free 




STOKES MANESTV 
MACHINES & WATER STILLS 
WIM, IN I'TTUKU \.K KNOWN 
UNriEli THE NAMK 




MANESTY MACHINES LTD. 



U C A P I' t: 



itOLESALE LTD ■ 



MANtSTY BUILDINGS 5 COLLLGt LANE LIVERPOOL 1 



TALKS TO PriARMACSTS 



Unostentatious 

The pack of " VARICONES " Brand 
REMEDY FOR PILES is very good 
class, being quiet and suitable. 

A big sale adjunct to this rennedy 
is a four-page leaflet — " What Piles 
are : How they Come : How they 
should be Treated " ; a quantity of 
which we supply with orders. 

A small supply of the goods, along- 
side a batch of leaflets, brings many 
sales, especially from shy people. 

The leaflets sell the " VARICONES." 
If not immediately, then very shortly 
after reading the leaflet. 

"VARICONES" Remedy is one of our Big 
Profit lines sold by chemists only. For a 
3 dozen order of 1 3d. size, or equivalent in 
the larger sizes, and a counter display with 
leaflets, you buy at half price. Thus the 
1 3d. size costs you 7id., the 3/- size 1/6d., 
and so on. 

There is big business to be done with 
••VARICONES." We know this by the 
enquiries we get from all over the country. 

May we send you a specimen leaflet and 
fuller details ? 





THOMPSON & CAPPER WHOLESALE LTD 



MANUFACTURING CHEMISTS 



MANESfY BolLDI.^Jv.S. 5 C HI EGc LANE, LIVERPOOL 1 



30 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



October 5. 1935 




In this printing business of ours we like to see all our efforts a little above the ordinary, 
for there is a particular pleasure and satisfaction in the effort which takes a man out 
of convention and out of himself. When a man takes his coat off to a job and tackles 
it with enthusiasm you know he is going to be happy, and the result is the kind of 
printing which is a credit to all concerned, and a distinct asset to the man who has to 
foot the bill. It should not be necessary, of course, to ask if a man likes his work — 
the spirit of unbounded enthusiasm ought to show it. A man should be so much in 
love with his job that he finds his greatest delight in it. He will love it for its own 
sake. He will see no difference between the pleasure he gets out of his job and that 
which he gets out of his spare hours. There can be no thrill or joy of achievement in 
work which has been carried out in a half-hearted and careless manner, and the man 
who has not discovered the joy of putting his heart and soul into every job he under- 
takes to do does not know the first principle of progress and success. We make a 
point of always trying to inspire the members of our own staff with the spirit of 
service and true craftsmanship. They love their job and they hke to do it as well as 
they possibly can. They also love getting to know more and more about it, and their 
enthusiasm and determination to produce printing which will speak well of the 
customer and interest people in what he has to sell is expressed and visible in every 
transaction. That is probably one of the reasons why so many people like to tell us 
what jolly good printing we are producing for them. 

Ideas and rough suggestions are prepared free and without any obligation 
THOMAS ^^1^%^^%^ J J] & SONS LTD 



KIRKSTALL HILL LEEDS 5 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



31 




POTTER & CLARKE 

LTD. 

60-64 ARTILLERY LANE, LONDON. E.L 

'Grams: " Horehomd, Phone, London." 'Phone: Bishopsgate 4761 (5 lines). 

AND AT 77 DANTZIC STREET, MANCHESTER. 4. 

'Grams: " Horehound, Manchester." 'Phone: Blackfriars 873^. 



32 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



October 5. 1935 



NEWFOUNDLAND 



COD LIVER OIL 



MEDICINAL P.B. 
Finest Quality 



Vitamin D . . . 120 

Int rnational unils par gramme 



Vitamin A ... 14 

1200 Inlernalioiial unili per gramme, bi-'logically rested 



Stock kepi at Liverpool. Ask for sample and quotation before buying 
Produced by The Tors Cove Trading Co., St. John 

Sole Distributors r — - 

FREDK. BOEHM LIMITED, 

17 Jewry Street, LONDON, E.C.3 



ADVERTISING GIFTS 



Very 
Original 




Very 
Accep' 
i> able 



Your Name in Gold on Each Article. 
Generous Quantity Terms. 

yVlokers . CALENDOX LTD. 
91 Petty France, Westminster, S.W„1 



TABLETS, PILLS, LOZENGES 

We are manufacturers for the Wholesale Trade. 
If you buy large or regular quantities, please write 
for quotations. 
BROOK, PARKER & Co. Ltd., BRADFORD 



Are you stocking 



YESTAMIN ? 

Dried Yeast in its most concentrated and most convenient form— powder 
and tablets. Generous terms and good discounts. Wrif* today to : 

WOOLDRIDOE MEDICINE Co., Ltd., 16 Cedars Rd., London, S.ViA 



D 



It will pay you to buy DIRECT fro?n the Manufacturers 




ania 

COMPRESSED TABLETS 



REGD. BRAND 



If you are wanting any variety 
of compressed Tablets — true to 
formula— ot the purest materials 
— finest finish and at lowest 
prices consistent with quality, 
then send an enquiry to : — 



righard: :Dam 

Phone ♦ Derby 2222 (3. lines) ♦ Gra 



EL & SON, LIMITED 

,s * Danfa, Derby * MANSFIELD Rd. DERBY ♦ 



MAKERS TO THE TRADE— ESTABLISH ED 1860 



October 5. 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



33 




An attractive display 

for a distinguished vitamin product 

Pharmacists who show this silent-salesman 
link up with valuable existing goodwill. 

'KEPLER' COD Liver Oil with MALT Extract 
shows a profitable return for regular display. 




G 1 8 9 5 C O P V R I G H r . 



34 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST October 5. 1935 






Li 





0 



DISPLAY MATERIAL 
ON REQUEST 



A Pmdwt of jnE BRITISH DRUG HplJSES UMJTED. WNDOfOi 




T.Cr.S. 



The Chemist and Druggist 



October 5, 1935 



Chemist ... Druggist 

A Weekly Journal of Pharmacy, the Drug, Chemical and Allied Trades 

The official organ of The Pharmaceutical Society of Ireland, 
The Pharmaceutical Society of Northern Ireland, 
The Chemists' and Druggists' Society of Ireland, and of 
other Chemists' Societies in Overseas Dominions 
PUBLISHED AT 

28 ESSEX STREET, STRAND, LONDON, W.C.2 

Telegrams : " Chemicus^ Estratid, Tondon" Telephone : Central 6565 (8 lines) 

BRANCHOFFtCES 

4 CANNON STREET. MANCHESTER (tEL. : BLACKFRIARS 3052) 372 FLINDERS LANE, MELBOURNE. AUSTRALIA 

54 FOSTER'S BUILDINGS. HIGH STREET. SHEFFIELD (TEL. : 22458* 55a SHORTLAND STREET. AUCKLAND. NEW ZEALAND 

19 WATERLOO STREET. GLASGOW (teL. : CENTRAL 2329) 155 AVENUE DE WAGRAM. PARIS. XVI l" (tEL. : ETOILE 19-79) 

PLANTAGE FRANSCHELAAN 32 AMSTERDAM-C. HOLLAND 



VOL. 123. NO. 2904 

PAGE 



Births 415 

Business Changes 415 

C. & D. Retail Price List 418 

Coming Events 415 

Correspondence : — 

Letters 435 

Dispensing Notes 435 

Miscellaneous Inquiries 436 

Deaths 415 

Diet and Climate 429 

Gazette 411 

Grocers Enlightened on 
Poisons Rules 427 



CONT 

PAGE 

Editorial Articles : — 

Renewal of N.H.I. Con- 
tracts 417 

Government Chemist's 
Annual Report 417 

Doctors and Public 
Medical Services 418 

Information Department 416 

Insurance Act Dispensing 412 

Irish Notes 409 

Marine Insurance 418 

Marriages 415 



ENT S 

PAGE 



National Pharmaceutical 
Union 410 

New Companies and Com- 
pany News 411 

News of the Weeli 407 

Personalities 413 

Pharmaceutical Society of 
Great Britain : — 

Council Meeting 423 

Opening of College of 
Pharmacy 424 

North British Execu- 
tive 426 



OCTOBER 5. 1935 
PAGE 

Physician's Collection of 



Pharmacy Jars 419 

Retrospect 436 

Salford Analyst's Report 430 

Scottish Notes 409 

Stoclt Exchange Prices ... 411 

Topical Reflections 409 

Trade Marks 410 

Trade Notes 414 

Trade Report 431 

Wills 415 



News of the Week 



A.B.C.M. Brussels Exhibition Awards 

The Association of British Chemical Manufacturers has been 
notified that its exhibits at the Brussels International Exhibi- 
tion have been awarded seven Grand Prix (the highest award), 
one Diploma d'Honneur (the next highest award) and one 
Gold Medal. 

Association of British Chambers of Commerce 

Several important subjects were discussed at the autumn 
meeting of the Association of British Chambers of Commerce 
held at Derby on September 26, including the school-leaving 
age, the subsidising of exports, and the increasing tendency 
towards legislation by Government departments. Mr. T. 
Edward Lescher, president of the Liverpool Chamber of Com- 
merce, moved : — 

That the Association views with concern the continued 
growth of trading in factories, workshops and offices by 
employees who retail such commodities as tobacco, sweets, 
hosiery, clothing, fancy goods, etc., as those indulging in 
such practices are not only wasting their employers' time, 
but their activities are a menace and definitely detrimental 
to legitimate ratepaying stores and shops." 

Mr. Lescher declared that the practice constituted a wide- 
spread evil. He asked the delegates to consider the retailers 
who were members of their Chambers, and to give them a 
helping hand in this matter. The resolution was carried 
unanimously. 

Chemists' Dental Society 

Increasing harmony in the profession was referred to by Mr. 
C. C. Greensmith (president) at the twenty-fifth annual general 
meeting of the Chemists' Dental Society, held at the Royal 



Horticultural Hall, Westminster, on Thursday, September 26, 
1935. The changes in the new dental benefit regulations were 
mentioned, especially the deletion of the clause relating to 
experimental clinics, the opposition to which was initiated by 
the C.D.S. The new scale of fees is due in 1936, and the 
conclusions reached by the profession are now being discussed 
with the approved societies so as to present the Dental Benefit 
Council if possible with an agreed revision. The increasing 
number of dental companies was very seriously considered, and 
the secretary was instructed to forward the views of the meeting 
to the Dental Board and to other dental organisations. The 
treasurer's report, presented by Mr. J. J. Laws, showed a very 
satisfactory balance. The following officers were elected for 
the ensuing year: — President, Mr. C. C. Greensmith; Vice- 
President, Mr. P. W. Vernon; Auditor, Mr. W. E. Barker; 
Treasurer, Mr. J. J. Laws; Council, Dr. E. Templar-Malins, 
Messrs. F. C. Ashford, A. E. Ashworth, W. E. Barker, S. 
Davis, C. C. Greensmith, G. C. C. Hinton, J. J. Laws, H. J. 
Morgan, F. R. Sutcliffe, W. Vernon, G. I. Williams. Secretary, 
Mr. J. W. Roberts. 10 Tavistock Place, London, W.C.i. 

Hull 

Members of Hull Chemists' Association and their friends, 
numbering about 100, recently visited the new refinery of 
British Cod Liver Oil Producers (Hull), Ltd., by invitation of 
Mr. Dawson, manager. The visitors saw the separation of 
water and liver debris from the crude oil (obtained by steaming 
the freshly-removed livers on the trawlers) by means of centri- 
fugal separators, the removal of stearine by freezing at 0° C. 
for three hours, and the final clarification and partial de- 
colorisation by means of fuller's earth. Later tea was served 
in the guest room, and a vote of thanks was proposed by Mr. 
H. Smart (president) and seconded by Mr. H. Watson (vice- 
president). 



B B 



408 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



October 5, 1935 



Liverpool 

At Liverpool Police Court, on September 26, the stipendiary 
magistrate imposed fines amounting to £4 on Philip McArdle, 
Broadgreen, for having vended at a stall a dutiable preparation 
unstamped and without a licence. Mr. C. Pocock, prosecuting, 
remarked that the defendant had been warned b}- the Customs 
authorities some time ago. 




Mr. G. Dalrymple, Managing Director of Ayrton, Saunders & Co., Ltd., 
Liverpool, and Mr. Norman A. Wood, Chairman of Directors of John 
Thompson (Wholesale Druggists, 1921), Ltd., Liverpool, on holiday together 
AT Port Erin, Isle of Man 

London 

The president of the Western Pharmacists' Association (Mr. 
David T. Jones) has sent out an attractive circular letter 
appealing for increased interest in and attendance at the meet- 
ings of the Association. Mr. Jones points out that an ex- 
cellent programme has been arranged for the coming session, 
commencing with a reunion on October 17, of which further 
notice will be given. 

At Marylebone Police Court, on September 27, Henry 
Thomas Hart (45), engineer, was remanded on charges of 
obtaining money and credit by false pretences. It was stated 
for the prosecution that, among other things, the accused 
represented that he had been asked by " Sheffield Chemists, 
Ltd.," to form a company to be known as Jenner's Chemist 
& Finance Trust, Ltd. 

Ai Kensington Petty Sessions, on October i, Frank Oldham, 
Thorpe Mews, W.io, was summoned for selling from his stall 
at -Portobello Road stainless iodine ointment deficient in iodine 
to the extent of 66 per cent. He pleaded " Not guilty." 
Formal evidence having been given, the defendant said he 
bought the ointment from a firm whose traveller he had 
present. After the traveller, Albert Seeley, had given 
evidence, the defendant added : The manufacturer delivered it 
himself and told me it was all right. I believe he is a member 
of the British Pharmaceutical Society. The summons was 
dismissed under the Probation of Offenders' Act on payment 
of 5s. CQsts. 

" Surgical Sutures " was the subject , of a lecture by Mr. H. 
Berry, B.Sc, Ph.C, at a meeting of the South-Eastern Asso- 
ciations at New Cross, S.E., on September 24, Mr. C. H. Foster 
(president) in the chair. The history of ligatures was outlined, 
from the earliest mention of catgut in 200 a.d. to the present- 
day use of sterile surgical gut. By means of lantern slides, the 
lecturer emphasised the chief difficulties underlying the pre- 
paration and sterilisation of collogen, from the intestina submu- 
cosa of herbivores. Other ligatures described were silk, silk- 
worm gut and kangaroo tendon. After a lively discussion a 
vote of thanks to Mr. Berry was proposed by Mr. F. J. Dyer, 
a vice-president of the Associations. 

Nearly two hundred employees and friends of May, Roberts 
& Co., Ltd., spent a thoroughly enjoyable evening on Sep- 
tember 28 at a dance held at the Victoria Halls, Bloomsbury 
Square, London, W.C.i. Among those present were five of 
the company's seven directors, namelv, Mr. R. Peck, Mr. A. 



Desert, Mr. R. A. Peck, Mr. C. G. Scott, and Mr. R. E. Marsh, 
to whom must go the laurels for arranging such a pleasant 
affair. There were also present Mr. Lewis R. Best and Mr. 
V. A. Beetch, general and assistant manager respectively of 
Cuticura Preparations. During the interval Mr. F. J. Winter, 
who jointly with Mr. W. J. Wiltshire ably acted as M.C., on 
behalf of the staff proposed and toasted the health of Mr. 
Desert and Mr. Scott in respect of their recent appointments, 
the former as a member of the board of the company and the 
latter as a junior director. Spot and other prizes were dis- 
tributed during the evening and dancing was to the music 
supplied by Fred Anderson's " Cabaret " Band. 

A meeting of the West Ham and District Association of 
Pharmacists and Branch of the Pharmaceutical Society was 
held at Stratford on September 24. Mr. W. J. Beardsley 
(chairman of the Law Committee of the Society) presided, and 
in introducing Mr. McManus, solicitor to the Society, gave a 
general survey of the work of that Committee as previously 
carried out. Mr. McManus, who was received with acclama- 
tion, dwelt lucidly on the many coming problems which will 
have to be solved when the new Act commences to operate 
in 1936. Among these were; Prosecutions for mis- 
demeanours and offences, and the recovery of all fines 
through the police courts, instead of by the old archaic 
system ; the registration of companies ; the setting up of 
a Statutory Committee ; the registration of premises, in- 
volving some 15,000 shops; the duties of inspectors; 
machinery to keep close watch on all pending legislation likely 
to affect the interests of pharmacists. A lively discussion fol- 
lowed, questions being asked by Mr. Reed (on restoration to 
membership of the Society, the status and training of appren- 
tices), Mr. Cloud (on the duties of Customs and Excise officers 
in relation to prosecutions for sales of known, admitted and 
approved remedies), Mr. Clifford Jones (on destamping), Mr. 
Graham (on the position of insurance committees with regard 
to contractors and the supply of drugs by qualified persons), 
and by Mr. Thomson (on shop registration fees), Mr. Clifford 
Jones moved a cordial vote of thanks to Mr. McManus for his 
enlightening address. 

Manchester 

The Manchester and District Pharmacists' Golfing Society on 
September 25 ended a good season with a sunny afternoon's 
play at Northenden Golf Club. The President's team had a 
" runaway " victory. Results were as follows: — 

President's Team Captain's Team 

J. H. Franklin (President) 

G. M. Evans 
W. J. Hope 
R. Demaine 
W. E. PhilUpson 
J. A. Collins 
E. Stabler 

H. Marsden 
H. Cromack, Jnr. 
T. Martin 



••\ 

::{ 
::{ 
:;{ 



P. W. Stuart (Captain) 


...\ 




T. Miller 


••/ 


0 


F. D. Gee 


..\ 




S. M. Bostock ... 


-/ 


0 


A. Maude 


-\ 




J. W. Aves 


••/ 


0 


H. Travis ... 


-\ 




Dr. McGarrol 


0 


V. Cromack 


::{ 




H. Taylor 




0 






0 



The president (Mr. J. H. Franklin) welcomed Mr. R. Hough 
and Mr. John Cleworth as donors of prizes and as their guests. 
After further remarks the following prizes were distributed ; — 



President's Prize G. M. Evans 
Captain's Prize ... J. A. Collins 
Ex-Captain's Prize G. M. Evans 
Griffiths Hughes Prize 

G. M. Evans 



Kerfoot Trophy ... F. D. Gee 
Woolley Trophy ... R. Demaine 
Mr. R. Hough's Prize G. R. Potts 
Mr. Cleworth's Prize 

W. E. Phillipson 



Second prizes in various competitions were awarded to 
Messrs. R. Demaine, J. H. Franklin, J. A. Collins, J. W. Hope 
and S. M. Bostock. Mr. Cleworth's prize was awarded for the 
best aggregate net score throughout the season by any member 
who had not won either a first or second prize during the 
season. 

Miscellaneous 

Summer time ends at 2 a.m. Greenwich mean time (3 a.m. 
British summer time) on October 6. 

Fire. — An outbreak of fire occurred on September 27 at the 
printing works of Alf. Harrison & Sons, Ltd., Burley Road, 
Leeds. Although considerable damage resulted, we are in- 
formed that certain parts of the factory will be in operation 
again almost immediately, and that service, delivery and so 
forth will be carried on as usual in the course of a few days. 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



Irish Notes 

Brevities 

Under the leadership of Mr. A. W. Mann, Ph.C, 7 Donegall 
Square North, secretary of the Belfast Branch of St. John's 
Ambulance Brigade, six classes for instruction in first aid and 
home nursing have been organised in Belfast. 

A fine camera study, entitled " An African Skyscape," from 
James B. Doran (The Border Pharmacy, Aliwal North, South 
Africa), was reproduced by the " Irish Independent " recently 
on its main news page. Mr. Doran has been a licentiate of the 
Pharmaceutical Society of Ireland since 1902. 

A correspondent writes: — "Mr. Connor of Nevvry is again 
a candidate for Council honours in Northern Ireland. He is 
one of the original founders of the Society, and has remained 
in office ever since. He has been president of both the 
Northern Society and the Pharmaceutical Society of Ireland. 
He is specially keen in advocating the interests of country 
chemists and in restricting, so far as possible, the sale of drugs 
to the pharmaceutical chemist." 

At the adjourned inquest on September 28 on Mary Ellen 
Boyd, New Mills, co. Tyrone, medical evidence was given 
that the woman's death was due to strychnine poisoning. 
Mr. Richard Marshall, Ph.C, Dungannon, stated that on 
May 9 the deceased, after making some ordinary purchases, 
asked for some strychnine to poison rats. He warned her of 
the danger of the poison, but knowing her well he sold her 
sixpennyworth — about 10 grains. She signed the poison 
register as " Ellen Boyd " and appeared to be quite normal. 
A verdict of " Death from poisoning " was returned. 



Scottish Notes 

Brevities 

The turnover in the drug department of the Northern Co- 
operative Society, Ltd., for the year ended August 31 was 
£37>893 IIS. 8^d. and the net profit was £5,goy gs. lojd., 
increases of £4,065 12s. 8Jd. and £940 8s. 6Jd. respectively. 

A super Ikonta camera was stolen on September 26 from 
the premises of Caithness Bros., photo finishers, 301 High 
Street, Kirkcaldy. The number is Y65122 and the retail 
price £iy 17s. Anyone seeing this camera is asked to com- 
municate with the local police. 

Johnstone (Renfrewshire) Town Council agreed recently to 
send a letter of protest to the Scottish Office and to the 
Parliamentary representative in reply to a letter from the 
Scottish Office stating that, under the Pharmacy and Poisons 
Act, 1933, the control of poisons would pass from the Town 
Council to the County Council after May i, 1936. 

The Dundee School of Pharmacy Former Students' Associa- 
tion opened the winter session with a military whist drive and 
dance at Lambs' Rooms, Reform Street, on September 25. 
Sixteen tables were occupied at whist, and the winners were 
as follows: — Misses J. G. Brydon, C. Gamage, B. Forbes, 
E. Gamage, J. Keay, H. Lynch, Marion Milne, D. Mitchell 
and Messrs. C. Brown, J. Hood, G. Mitchell and B. S. Robert- 
son. Prizes were presented, after tea, by Mrs. J. Gibson. A 
short entertainment of song and dance numbers was given by 
a variety troupe and by Miss F. Phillips, and dancing followed. 
Miss E. Fyfe (president) and Mr. W. E. Foote (secretary) were 
in charge of the ceremonies. 



Topical Reflections 

By Xrayser 



■' Winter Tales " 

(C. &- D., September 28, p. 395) is an apt 
description of much that is heard in our branch meetings 
from September to April. The old game will soon be played as 
before — the visit of the member of council; the well-rounded 
periods; the clever skating over very thin ice; the vote of 
thanks and the dispersal of members to their several phar- 
macies; and the inevitable awakening from the spell to the 
realisation that pharmacy is where it was and likely to remain 
so. What opportunities these meetings present, and how little 
these are grasped ! The trouble is that so many of the subjects 
discussed have no practical connection with pharmacy as it is 
to-day. There are two suggestions I may make that, if acted 
upon, might improve matters. The first is that brighter meet- 
ing places are badly needed for our meetings. Often these are 
damp, badly warmed and lighted rooms, with little or no 
ventilation. The second is that our meetings are usually held 
at too late an hour. I know that the majority of pharmacists 
cannot get away till the shop is closed; but often it is 9 o'clock 
before a meeting opens, and then many of those who attend 
are too tired to take any active part in the proceedings. I 
agree with you that some plain indication of pharmaceutical 
policy is the first requirement at our association meetings. 
Another is some method of getting pharmacists into line re- 
garding prices, particularly for private prescriptions; and a 
third is informative di.scussions on salesmanship. 

The Chemists' Exhibition, 

the forty-fourth of the London series, 
has come and gone (p. 387). I remember the Exhibitions of 
twenty-five years ago, and I have noticed the change that has 
gradually crept over them. The first Exhibition I attended was 
that held in 1907 ; if the list of exhibitors of that year is com- 
pared with those of this year, some striking differences will be 
noticed. With the close of the war the Exhibition took on a 
new lease of life, and the first two or three years' shows must 



have been remarkably successful lor the drug houses exhibiting. 
Since then I have noticed a change in the type of stand. 
Gradually the drug side has been less well represented and the 
toilet and sundries side has increased. This is not to disparage 
in any way the organisers of the Exhibition, who have always 
done their job, in my opinion, remarkably well ; the change is 
a sign of the altered conditions in which pharmacy is now 
working. Chemists do not visit the Exhibition to buy drugs ; 
they want to see the latest ideas on the more artistic and 
colourful side of their calling. The changing of the month for 
holding the Exhibition from May to September has, I believe, 
been approved generally. 

I Am Not a Film Fan, 

but I like to visit the cinema occasion- 
ally. On my last visit, a few nights ago, I was greatly 
intrigued with the beginning of a film, which cleverly sug- 
gested in the movements of certain "regiments" of figures, 
resembling cylindrical pieces of wood, the rhythm of a certain 
overture, the music of which accompanied the movements ; this 
is very popular with bands at seaside and holiday resorts. My 
attention, both of the eye and the ear, having been successfully 
secured, I was introduced to a well-known tooth-paste, tubes 
of which took the place of the wooden figures. I shall not 
readily forget the experience — nor the tooth-paste ; and I can 
well imagine that the advertisement will be a fruitful one to 
the manufacturers of the article in question. This is apropos 
of your short article (p. 400) on "Propaganda from films" ; 
it appears to me that sucli, appealing as they do to the eye and 
the ear, have a future as advertising media. This type of film 
must not, however, be overdone, nor must the blatant type 
replace the discreet, or their value will soon deteriorate. Not 
all articles sold by the chemist are suitable for presentation. 
Tooth-paste should be used by everyone, presumably, therefore 
everyone seeing such a film as that described should be a 
potential purchaser ; an infants' food, for instance, advertised 
in a similar way, be it presented ever so skilfully, would make 
nothing like such an appeal in the average cinema. 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



October 5, 1935 



National 
Pharmaceutical Union 

Executive Meetings 

Meetings of the Executives of the National Pharmaceutical 
Union and Chemists' Defence Association were held at 4 and 
5 Queen Square, London, W.C.i, on September 24, Mr. S. J. 
Stearn in the chair. 

"Chemists' Friends" Scheme 

The Executive received a report from the Marketing and 
Trade Prices Committee in regard to the progress of the 
" Chemists' Friends " scheme. Invitations to co-operate in the 
scheme had been sent to a number of manufacturers and very- 
satisfactory replies had been received. It was resolved that 
authority be given to N.P.U., Ltd., to make agreements on 
behalf of the National Pharmaceutical Union in matters con- 
nected with the "Chemists' Friends" scheme. The Executive 
adopted the recommendation of the Committee that soaps, 
infants' foods and toilet articles generally could not be accepted 
for inclusion in the list, but that the list should be confined to 

(1) pharmaceutical preparations of therapeutic character and 

(2) "branded" surgical dressings and medical specialities. 
The Executive gave authority for the publication monthly in 
' ' The Chemists' Trade Record " of a list of articles which had 
been placed on the Chemists' Friends list, and also for a general 
announcement to manufacturers through the medium of adver- 
tisements in the trade Press. 

N.H.I. Contract 

The Executive received the report of the Central N.H.I. 
Committee on the negotiations with the Ministry of Health 
which had taken place in regard to the terms of the new N.H.I, 
contract. The Executive accepted the report, and subject to 
certain modifications of the terms being agreed by the Ministry 
of Health, authorised submission to the N.H.I. Conference for 
approval . 

D.'D.A. Prescriptions under the Testing Scheme 

The secretary reported that he had been in communication 
with the Ministry of Health regarding the suggestion which 
had been reported in a recent edition of ' ' The British Medical 
Journal ' ' that Dangerous Drugs Act prescriptions ought to be 
used for testing of dispensing. A reply had been received stat- 
ing that the present position was not satisfactory to the 
Ministry, and that in their opinion D.D.A. prescriptions ought 
not to be ruled out of the testing of dispensing scheme ; but 
they stated that it was not intended to make a speciality of 
taking D.D.A. prescriptions for testing purposes nor to use the 
scheme for detecting contraventions of D.D.A. Regulations. 
The Home Office had, at the request of the Ministry, promised 
to amend the Regulations and exempt such test prescriptions 
from the operations of the D.D.A. Regulations. The Execu- 
tive directed that a reply be sent to the Ministry of Health 
pointing out the extra trouble which would be caused to the 
chemist in regard to the necessary entries in the D.D.A. register 
which would have to be made, as the chemist would not know 
whether the prescription was a "test" until he had dispensed 
it and completed the necessary formalities required by the 
Regulations. 

N.H.I. Conference 

The Executive authorised the secretary to call a Conference 
of Pharmaceutical Committees for October 30. 

National Mark Malt Products 

The Executive reconsidered the decision to use the National 
Mark as an additional specification for N.H.I, purposes. The 
original acceptance of the specification had been due to a mis- 
taken idea that manufacturers were prepared to supply National 
Mark malt products in either jars or containers at the same 
price as ordinary B.P.C. preparations. It had since transpired 
that the nianufacturers were not prepared to give an undertak- 
ing to supply National Mark malt products in jars at the same 
prices as B.P.C; the Executive therefore decided to inform the 
Ministry of Health that the Executive, in these circumstances, 
withdrew their acceptance of the additional specification. 



Clearing House 

The secretary reported that the operation of two clearances 
a month had proved very successful. The "open" clearance 
on September 20 had yielded a record number of payments, no 
fewer than 2,196 separate payments having been made by the 
clearing house. 

C.D.A. Matters 

The secretary reported that there were seventeen cases out- 
standing since the last meeting of the directors ; eight of these 
might be considered closed, and settlements had been effected 
in regard to six of the cases as follows : — Skin rash developed 
as result of iodide mixture supplied ; claim settled by payment 
of £45 15s. Labels transposed ; claim settled for £2^. Blister- 
ing after use of plaster ; claim settled for £j 15s. Injuries 
caused by bottle exploding ; claim settled for /30 5s. Injuries 
caused by fall on shop floor ; claim settled for /18 7s. 6d. Coat 
damaged while removing stain ; claim settled for los. 

Twenty-four new cases had arisen during the last two months, 
and the following settlements had been arranged in regard to 
fourteen of them: — Turkeys died after application of acid, 
carbol. supplied for ol. carboL; claim settled by payment of 
£1 los. Tartaric acid supplied for cream of tartar ; claim 
settled for los. Puppies died after administration of worm 
capsules ; claim settled for £2 14s. 6d. Spectacles lost while 
left for repairs ; claim settled for 12s. 6d. Turpentine supplied in 
dirty container ; claim settled for £2 los. Blistering after use 
of sun tan oil ; claim settled for ;^I4 14s. Injuries caused by 
faulty smelling salts bottle ; claim settled for /3 15s. Clothing 
damaged by spirit lamp flame ; claim settled for 12s. 6d. In- 
juries caused by falling sunblind ; claim settled for 14s. 6d. 
Damage to car caused by cycling errand-boy (two cases); claims 
settled for £1 17s. 6d. and £2 6s. 6d. respectively. Damage to 
clothing of cyclist caused by cycling errand-boy ; claim settled 
for £1 los. Clothing splashed with developing solution ; claim 
settled for £1. Cycle damaged by cycling errand-boy; claim 
settled for £1 5s. 6d. The secretary reported that legal advice 
had been given to members on a large variety of subjects, and 
that thirty analyses had been undertaken for members under the 
"free" arrangement. 



Trade-Mark Applications 

The figures in parentheses refer to the classes in which the 
marl<s are grouped. A list of classes and particulars, as to 
registration are given in "The Chemist and Druggist Diary," 
1935. p. 323. 

{From " The Trade Marks Journal," September ii, 1935.) 
" Sterilastic " under picture of bird on square shape ; for bandages 

(11). By Lewis Meyer Heller, Sentinel House, Southampton 

Row, London, W.C.i. 561,982. 
" Country House Herbal Cream " on oblong shape with border ; 

for toilet cream (48). By Susan Lady Tweedsmuir, Elsfield 

Manor, Elsfield, Nr. Oxford. 561,312. 
" Fairypuff " ; for powder puffs (48). By British Fur Puffs, 111 

Oxford Street, London, W.i. 561,593. 
" La Cinquieme Nuit " ; for all goods (48). By Cyclax, Ltd., 

58 South Molton Street, London, W.i. 561,706. 
" Zenaset ■' ; for perfumery, etc. (48). By Zena (Cosmetics), Ltd., 

23 Lloyd Street, Manchester. 561,804. (Associated.) 
" Esquire " ; for perfumery, etc. {48). By The J. B. WiUiams Co., 

Glastonbury, Hartford, Connecticut, U.S.A. 562,175. 

Application Amendments 
The specification for " Calvitone " in Class 3, No. 559,124, by Savory 

& Moore, Ltd., has been amended to " Calcium vitamin tonic 

medicines for human use." 
The specification for " Ceeolite " in Class 2, No. 560,276, by W. 

Clements, has been amended to " Disinfectant soap in liquid 

form and disinfectant fluids." 

{From " The Trade Marks Journal," September 18, 1935.) 
Monogram "B M L" in diamond shape; for chemicals (i). By 

Bristol Manufacturers, Ltd., York Eoad, Bedminster Bridge, 

Bristol, 3. 560,324. 
" Bolsamax " ; for medicinal chemicals (3). By A. Wood, Ltd., 

1x6 High Street, Brentford. 561,166. 
" Sterelex " ; for medicinal chemicals (3). By Goodall, Backhouse 

& Co., Ltd., 7, 9, II, 13 and 15 White Horse Street, Leeds. 

561,305- 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



41-1 



New Companies 

and Company News 

P.C. means Private Company and R.O. Registered Office 

Dalment, Ltd. (P.C.)-— Capital £ioo. Objects: To carry 
on the business of chemists, druggists, etc. R.O. : 40/42 
Oxford Street, London, W.i. 

John D. Kerr & Co., Ltd. (P.C.)— Capital £1,000. Ob- 
jects: To carry on the business of chemists, druggists, etc. 
Solicitors: E. & B. Haworth & Nuttall, 17 Button Street, 
Accrington. 

Argyle Rubber Co., Ltd. (P.C.).— Registered in Edinburgh. 
—Capital £iuo. Objects: To carry on the business of drug- 
gists' sundriesmen, india-rubber merchants, etc. R.O. : 44 
Jamaica Street, Glasgow. 

Solvent Recoveries, Ltd. (P.C). — Registered in Edin- 
burgh. — Capital ;^4,ooo. Objects: To carry on the business of 
recovery, purchase and sale of solvents, etc. Alexander H. 
Tod, 5 Victoria Road, Lenzie, Dumbartonshire, director. 

Johnson & Johnson (Ireland), Ltd. (P.C). — Registered in 
Dublin. — Capital ;^i,500. Objects: To carry on the business 
of surgical bootmakers, artificial limb, bandage, crutch makers, 
etc. Joseph A. Walsh, 38 Dame Street, Dubhn, director. 

Dental Instruments and Accessories, Ltd. (P.C.)— 
Capital £600. Objects : To adopt an agreement with Karl 
Schumacher, and to carry on the business in surgical instru- 
ments and equipment of all kinds, etc. Solicitor; H. Snow- 
man, 6 Billiter Street, E.C.3. 

Vecco Chemical Proiducts, Ltd. (P.C). — Capital ;^i,5oo. 
Objects : To acquire the business of The Van Essen Chemical 
Co. heretofore carried on at 19 Great Dover Street, S.E.i, to 
acquire the registered trade mark " Vecco," numbered 557,614 
in Class 47, and to carry on the business of manufacturers of 
and dealers in chemicals, gases, drugs, medicines, etc. 



Stock Exchange Prices 



£1 shares unless otherwise stated 



Borax Consolidated, Ltd. — -Directors announce that con- 
sideration of a dividend on the 6 per cent, preferred ordinary 
shares is postponed until after the completion of the year's 
account. 

H. M. Edwards (Chemists), Ltd. — At a meeting held in 
London on September 19 it was resolved that this company be 
wound up voluntarily. Mr. P. S. Booth, Kimberley House, 
14-17 Holborn Viaduct, London, E.C.i, was appointed liqui- 
dator, and a meeting of the creditors held on September 25 
confirmed the resolution. 

National Drug & Chemical Co. of Canada.- — A meeting of 
the first preference shareholders of the company was held 
recently in Liverpool, when approval was given to a scheme of 
arrangement under which the first preference shares are to be 
reduced from 20s. to 15s. and the second preference and 
ordinary shares (held in Canada) by $2,242,845 ; dividend 
arrears amounting to ^285, 500 on the first preference shares 
are to be cancelled, and the dividend on these shares reduced 
from 6^ per cent, to 6 per cent, and made non-cumulative for 
two years. Mr. Charles Gane, one of the trustees for the first 
preference shareholders, presided, and in recommending the 
scheme for adoption said the heavy sacrifice which they were 
asked to make was the price they had to pay for obtaining 
complete control of the company and enabling the company to 
make a new start. The English shareholders would have 
865,926 votes as against 179,171 held by the Canadian share- 
holders. It was better to have a share of 15s. with a monetary 
and market value than a share of 20s. with neither of these 
advantages. The resolution was carried without dissent. 



Gazette 



Partnership Dissolved 

Barrett, W., and Swainson, J. H., 2t Albert Road, Devon- 
port, chemists and opticians, under the style of Barrett & 
Swainson. 



Allen & Hanburys, 7% Prefd. Ord. 
Amalg. Dental Co., 8% Prefd. Ord. 

,, „ Deferred £ I 

Aspro, Ltd. 

.\yrton. Saunders & Co. 7|% Pref. 
Beechams Pills, Deferred 5s. shares 
Banger's Food, Ord. ... 
Benzol & By Products cum. part. Pref. 

Berger (Lewis) & Sons, Ord 

Blundell Spence & Co. 
Boake (A.), Roberts & Co., 5% Pref. 
Boots Pure Drug, Ord. 5s. shares ... 
Boots Pure Drug, 7% " A " Prefd. Ord ... 
Boots Cash Chemists (S.), 6% " A " Pref.... 
Borax Consold., Dfd. Ord. ... 

Bovril, Ord 

„ Defd 

British Cvanides, Ord., 2S. shares ... 

British Drug Houses, The, Ord. 

British Glues & Chemicals, 4s. Ord. 

British Oil and Cake Mills, Prefd. Ord. ... 

British Oxygen, Ord. 

British Photo. Indus., 6% Cum. Pref. 

Burt, Boulton & Haywood, Ord. ... 

Bush (W. J.) & Co., 5% Pref. £5 

Callard, Stewart & Watt, Ord 

Cooper, McDougall & Robertson, Ord. 
Crosfield (Joseph) & Sons, 6J% Pref. 
Dubarry Perfumery, Ord. is. 

7i% Pref 

Eastman Kodak Com. (no nom. value) 

Eno Propriet'y, Ord. 5s. 

Evans Sons Lescher & Webb, Ord. 6s. 8d. 

shares 

,, ,, „ 6% cum. part. Pref. 

Field (J. C. & J.), Ord 

GaUoway (P. H.), Ord. 2S 

7i% Cum. Pref 

Genatosan, Ltd., is. ... 

Gossage (William), 6i% Pref 

Griffiths Hughes (Kruschen) Ord. ... 
Grout & Co., Ord. 
Hodders, Ord. is. 

Ilford, Ltd., Ord 

6% Pref 

Impericd Chemical, 7% Pref. 

Ord 

,, ,, Defd. los. 

Intern. Sponge Importers, 6% Pref 

Kent (G. B.) & Sons, 5i% Pref 

Knight (John), 25% Prefd. Ord 

Laporte (B.) & Co., Ltd., Ord 

Lever Bros., Ltd., 7% Pref. 

8% Pref 

„ „ 20% Prefd. Ord. £1 

Lewis & Burrows, Ord. 

6% Pref 

Liebig's Ext. of Meat, Ord. £5 

Macleans 6% Red. Pref 

Mellin's Food, 6% Pref 

Nathan, J. (Glaxo), 7% Pref 

8% Prefd. los. 

Ord. IS 

Pears (A. & F.), 5% Deb* £100 

Phosferine (Ashton & Parsons), 8% cum. 
partic. Ord. ... 

Reckitt & Sons, Ord. 

Salt Union, Ord. 

Sangers, Ord. 5s. 

" Sanitas," The, Co., 9% Pref. 

Sanitas Trust, 10% partic. Pref. 

Smith (Stephen) & Co., Ord. 5s. 

Spratt's Patent, Ord. 

Stevenson & Howell, 6i% Cum. Pref. 

United Glass Bottle Man., Ord 

Veno Drug Co., 8% Pref 

Virol, Ltd., Ord 

7% Pref. 

White (A. J.), Ltd., Ord. los 

White (Timothy) & Taylors, 7i% Pref. ... 

Ord. 5s 

Woodlands Chemists, Ord. 5s. 

Wright, Layman & Umney (1932), 7% cum. 

Pref , ... 

Yorkshire Indigo & Col. Dyers, 5s. Ord. ... 



Dec. 31, 
1934 



Aug. 31 
1935 



s. 


d. 


s. 


d. 


21 


3 


23 


0 


23 


9 


24 


9 


8 


3 


8 

16 


9 






0 


19 


6 


22 


3 


26 


6 


30 


6 


43 


6 


41 


3 


2 


6 


2 


6 


41 


3 


63 


9 


19 


0 


17 


6 


21 


3 


20 


0 


46 


0 


49 


9 


31 


0 


32 


0 


28 


9 


28 


9 


II 


6 


16 


9 


29 


9 


23 


3 


17 


9 


14 


6 


3 


1^ 


3 


li 


19 


3 


19 


9 


4 


0 


5 


6 


45 


0 


48 


6 


84 


0 


107 


0 


3 


0 


3 


3 


22 


0 


20 


6 


105 


0 


1 10 


0 


5 


6 


3 


3 


35 


0 


35 


0 


30 


0 


31 


0 


6 


3 


5 


7i 


27 


6 


28 


6 


$ii3i 


$147 


12 


0 


9 


4i 


2 


9 


4 


9 


5 


9 


7 


6 


26 


6 


24 


6 


3 


9 


3 


6 


27 


0 


27 


0 


5 


6 


6 


6 


30 


6 


30 


6 


49 


9 


53 


9 


19 


3 


22 


6 


0 


6 


0 


6 


27 


6 


24 


6 


25 


0 


25 


0 


34 


li 


32 


9 


37 


3 


34 


9 


9 


7i 


8 


4i 


16 


9 


9 


6 


3 


9 


3 


9 


95 


0 


97 


6 


104 


6 


107 


6 


32 


0 


31 


0 


33 


0 


32 


6 


75 


6 


76 


9 


27 


6 


21 


3 


22 


6 


21 


0 




£I2| 


I 


3 


0 


10^ 


25 


6 


24 


0 


12 


6 


12 


9 


2 


6 


3 


6 


£110 


£110 


24 


0 


20 


6 


115 


3 


114 


0 


38 


9 


43 


9 


22 


0 


22 


4i 


31 


9 


33 


9 


29 


0 


33 


0 


12 


9 


12 


H 


71 


9 


70 


6 


26 


3 


26 


9 






40 


3 


27 


9 


26 


0 


26 


3 


30 


0 


26 


0 


26 


3 


22 


0 


21 


0 


31 


0 


27 


0 


21 


9 


20 


6 






4 


3 


25 


0 


23 


9 


0 


q 


0 


3 



Sept. 30 
1935 



s. d. 

23 6 

24 3 
8 o 

15 9 

21 9 



I 10 



62 


6 


17 


3 


19 


7i 


48 


6 


32 


3 


29 


0 


17 


0 


23 


6 


14 


3 


3 


0 


18 


9 


5 


9 


46 


6 


106 


3 


3 


0 


17 


0 


107 


6 


2 


6 


33 


9 


29 


6 


5 


7i 


28 


6 


$158 


8 


9 


4 


6 


7 


6 


24 


6 


3 


3 


27 


0 


6 


9 


30 


0 


52 


6 


22 


6 


0 


4i 


24 


0 


25 


6 


31 


9 


34 


6 


8 


4i 


9 


6 


3 


0 


97 


6 


107 


6 


30 


3 


3r 


9 


76 


6 


22 


0 


22 


6 


£12 


i 


21 


li 


1 


3 


23 


6 


12 


6 


3 


6 


£111 


20 


6 


no 


0 


41 


9 


22 


9 


33 


9 


31 


6 


1 1 


6 


7r 


3 


26 


3 


39 


0 


25 


3 


28 


9 


26 


3 


20 


0 


26 


6 


20 


0 


4 


0 


24 


0 


0 


3 



^12 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST October 5. 1935 



Insurance Act Dispensing 

Record of matters concerning Chemists' interests in the National Health Insurance Acts 



Blackburn. — At a recent meeting of Lancashire Prescription 
Bureau the secretary submitted statistics showing that the 
number of prescriptions dispensed during the quarter ended 
March 31 was 688,688, compared with 650,364 for the corre- 
sponding quarter of 1934, and 796,832 for 1933. The costs of 
ingredients and dispensing for the three periods were: Ingre- 
dients, ;^i2,740 and ;^io,o8o ; ;^ii,935 and Ig.boj ; dispensing, 
;^I4,994 and £n.,3T7. The average cost per prescription has 
not changed from J.gd. during the three quarters. 

Bournemouth. — The Bournemouth Insurance Committee, at 
a meeting on September 23, considered a statement from the 
Ministry of Health to the effect that the Minister was advised 
that a chemist whose name is removed from the register is 
not entitled to dispense medicines under contract with an 
Insurance Committee pending his restoration, though he is 
still entitled to supply drugs (other than poisons) and appli- 
ances. It appears that the Insurance Committee should notify 
any chemist whose name has been removed of their intention 
to make the necessary adjustment to the Committee's medical 
list. It was agreed that chemists concerned be again informed 
of the position. A request from the Bournemouth Pharma- 
ceutical Committee for support to a recommendation depre- 
cating the system of refunding the deposit on bottles was 
answered with a suggestion that the question would best be 
referred to the National Pharmaceutical Union. 

Derbyshire. — At a meeting of the county Insurance Com- 
mittee, recently, it was announced that the average expendi- 
ture on drugs per person for one month in the committee's 
area was 2.3d. The average cost of prescriptions in Derby- 
shire was 7.8d. Messrs. A. E. Harrison and Bernard Philip 
Kyle were received as new members. 

London. — A meeting of the Pharmaceutical Committee was 
held on September 17, Mr. D. A. Rees (chairman) presiding. 
Reports on the checking of prescriptions for March and April 
indicated that the margins of error in pricing were -1-0.05 and 
-F0.04 per cent, respectively. Messrs. Barnard, Keall and 
Melhuish were reappointed to serve on the Pharmaceutical 
Service Subcommittee of the London Insurance Committee for 
the year ending October 31, 1936, and Messrs. Milner, Noble 
and Thompson were reappointed as deputies for the same 
period. Arising from a complaint received from the Panel 
Committee alleging that in three London districts the dispens- 
ing facilities after 8 p.m. were inadequate, the secretary was 
instructed to verify records of the facilities available for the 
dispensing of scripts marked "Urgent" in the districts re- 
ferred to, and to report to the Panel Committee. Figures for 
the first six months of the years 1934 '^nd 1935 are compared 
in the following table : — 





1934 


1935 


Total No. of prescriptions ... 


4,489,417 


4,453,261 


Cost of ingredients ... 


£63,436 9S- 


£63,772 6s. 


Cost of dispensing fees 


£81,998 4s. 


£80,966 8s. 


Average cost of ingredients 


3 • 39d. 


3-44d. 


Average cost of dispensing fees 


4-38d. 


4-36d. 


Total No. of persons on list... 


1, 790,429 


1,761,617 



In five cases dealt with under the Testing Scheme during July, 
one chemist was cautioned and four were censured. 



Oxford. — The statutory meeting of the Oxford Pharmaceu- 
tical Committee was held on September 17, when Mr. H. O. 
Oddy was elected Chairjnan and Mr. Horatio C. Goodall re- 
appointed Secretary. The other members of the Committee are 
Messrs. W. Ambrose, C. J. Bellamy, R. A. Neville, G. B. Rose, 
H. H. Swift. — The first meeting of the newly elected 
Oxfordshire Pharmaceutical Committee was held on Septem- 
ber 7. Messrs. W. Ambrose (Oxford), O. J. Barley (Thame), 
O. L. Carrington (Chipping Norton), H. C. Goodall (Oxford), 
J. T. Mountain (Bicester), R. G. Neave (Witney), H. O. Oddy 
(Headington) and W. T. Ransome (Witney) were returned 
without opposition. Mr. R. G. Neave was elected Chairman 
and Mr. H. C. Goodall re-elected Secretary. 



Plymouth. — At a recent meeting of the Plymouth Insurance 
Committee it was reported that the number of insured persons 
in the city was 68,761, an increase of 7,267 in ten years. 
248,226 prescriptions had been dispensed during 1934, in 
which year l^iH was spent on insulin. In the fourteen dis- 
tricts included in the south-western area the expenditure on 
insulin during 1934 amounted to ;^5,283. It was remarked 
that Plymouth could congratulate itself on the efficient way in 
which the Act was administered and the manner in which the 
doctors and pharmacists played their parts. 

Portsmouth. — The resignation of Alderman F. G. Foster, 
J. P., for many years in business as a chemist in the locality, 
was received at a meeting of the Portsmouth Insurance Com- 
mittee recently. It was reported that a chemist who also owns 
a drug store had been in the habit of accepting insurance 
prescriptions at the drug store and sending them to his phar- 
macy to be dispensed. The Committee had pointed out to the 
chemist that in their view this was a contravention of 
Clause 5 (i) of the chemist's terms of service and urged a dis- 
continuance of the practice ; this the chemist has undertaken 
to do. Two tests were reported upon. One case showed an 
excess of ammonium carbonate in a mixture. The Subcom- 
mittee did not regard the error as serious, and recommended 
that no penalty should be inflicted. In the other case (Mist. 
Ferri et Ammon. Cit. N.F.) the analysis showed absence of 
ammon. carb. Although all previous tests from the chemist 
showed a high standard of accuracy the Subcommittee recom- 
mended that a fine of £1 should be imposed. 

Smethwick. — A proposal by the Smethwick Insurance 
Committee that arrangements should be made for the trans- 
ference of school medical records to the insurance practitioners 
who ultimately become responsible for medical treatment of 
persons concerned, has elicited a reply that the Board of 
Education and the Ministry of Health had considered the 
question, but that it had not been possible to reach a decision. 
"I'he proposal of the Committee in the matter was solely that 
the records should be transmitted to the insurance practitioners 
concerned for their information. The cost of the following 
articles has been debited to the doctors who issued the pre- 
scriptions : — 

Elastic Knee Cap . . . . . . . . . . . . -is. id. 

Boil Plaster 4d. 

2. Elastoplast Dressings . . . . . . . . . . 4d. 

I. Eye Shade . . . . . . . . . . . . 5d. 

I. Giyc. Syringe . . . . . . . . . . . . 2s. 8d. 

The following statistics relate to the cost of prescribing for 
insured persons in Smethwick during the quarter ended 
June 30 : — ■ 

Total number of prescriptions . . . . . . . . 40,626 

Total cost /i,339 i8s. id. 

This compares with ;£i,407 13s. lod. in the quarter ended 
June 30, 1934. The number of persons included in the register 
of the Committee as entitled to medical benefit on July i was 
38,180, including 383 deposit contributors, compared with a 
total of 37,816 on July i, i934- 

Southport. — At a meeting of the Southport Borough Insur- 
ance Committee on September 18 it was reported that the 
results of six prescription tests have been satisfactory. Alder- 
man Aveling .said that he did not see how it was possible to get 
nearer perfection than they did. 

Staffordshire. — It was reported to the Staffordshire Insur- 
ance Committee, recently, that during the quarter ended 
June 30, 260,545 prescriptions had been issued at a cost of 
£S,^&T., the number of persons being 253,759. This corresponds 
to an average cost per insured person of 8d. and a frequency 
per insured person of 1.03. 

Yarmouth. — -The National Pharmaceutical Union has 
elected the following chemists members of Yarmouth Pharma- 
ceutical Committee: — D. Drummond, R. C. Hannant, P. R. 
Hill, A. E. Richmond, D. Tunbridge, F. E. Whitfield, G. T. 
Woodcock and T. J. Woodcock. The committee has selected 
Mr. Richmond as its chairman and Mr. Whitfield as secretary. 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



413 



Personalities 



Sir St Clair Thomson, M.D., F.R.C.P., F.R.C.S,, LL.D., 
whose collection of pharmacy jars is the subject of an illus- 
trated article on pp. 419-22 of this issue, is best known, per- 
haps, as the author of "Diseases of the Nose and Throat," 
now in its third edition, and as a past-president of the Royal 
Society of Medicine. Sir St Clair is a corresponding member 
of several learned societies in various parts of the world, and 
undertakes a good deal of honorary work for London and other 
hospitals. His rank in medicine has received recognition in 
the award of numerous British and foreign distinctions. His 




Ftiuto\ [tlltoit O- Fry 




monographs on medical subjects do not complete the re- 
cord of his authorship. The delightful book " Shakespeare 
and Medicine" attracted widespread attention when it was 
published ; and he has also written his reminiscences of 
Lord Lister. He has long been a collector of prints, .in 
colour, on Shakespearian subjects, and his collection of these 
is believed to be unique. When they became almost unob- 
tainable. Sir St Clair turned his attention to miniatures : it 
is only recently that he has taken up the study of pottery of 
pharmaceutical interest. We have no doubt that our article 
will appeal to experts as well as to those who admire beautiful 
specimens for their intrinsic charm. 

Mr. W. Guenigault, manager of the essential oil department 
of Chas. Zimmermann & Co., Ltd., St. Mary-at-Axe, London, 
E.C.j, who recently met with an accident in Norfolk, is making 
steady progress towards recovery and hopes to be returning to 
business in about ten days' time. 

Mr. Arthur Dobson, chemist and druggist, Blackburn, has 
been elected a member of the Executive of the National Phar- 
maceutical Union as representative of the north-western area, 
in succession to the late Mr. Thomas Hardy (C. &- D., Sep- 
tember 28, p. 381). Mr. Dobson has held several offices in 
pharmaceutical organisations, including the presidency of the 
Blackburn and District Chemists' Association and chairman- 
ship of the North-East Lancashire Branch of the Pharma- 
ceutical Society. Prior to starting in business for himself in 
Moss Street, over fifteen years ago, he was with Booth & 
Openshaw, chemists, Blackburn, for twenty years. 



Notice is given in " The London Gazette " that Daniel Ivan 
Gracey, medical practitioner, has assumed the name of Ivan 
Hubert Gracey by deed poll. 

Mr. Ronald Hewlett Macnab, B.Pharm., Ph.C, has joined 
the staff of C. I. Hewlett & Son, Ltd., London, E.C.2, in charge 
of their aseptic department. Mr. Macnab, who holds the 
diploma in biochemical analysis of the Pharmaceutical Society, 
is a nephew of Mr. Vivian C. Hewlett, Ph.C, F.C.S., and a 
great-grandson of the founder of the business. 

Sir Frederick Gowland Hopkins, M.A., M.B., D.Sc, 
F.R.C.P., P.R.S., who delivered the inaugural address at the 
opening of the ninety-fourth session of the Pharmaceutical 
Society's School, on October 2 (p. 424), has been Professor of 
Biochemistry at Cambridge University since 1914. and Sir 
William Dunn Professor since 1921. He was president of the 
Royal Society in 1931 and president of the British Association 
in 1933. In pharmaceutical circles Sir Frederick is perhaps 
best known for his researches in connection with vitamins. 
Some results of his early experiments, which had extended 
intermittently over several years, were published in 1912. In- 
adequate purification led earlier workers, and later workers 
also, to claim that successful nutrition might be obtained on 




Photo] [Press Portrait Bureau 

Sir Frederick Gowl.\nd Hopkins 



artificial dietaries. Sir Frederick employed diets in which very 
complete purification of the protein, carbohydrate, and (as 
the author then thought) of the fats administered was a special 
feature. A novel feature of these experiments was that he 
showed by estimations of the energy consumptions of the 
animals that this failure was not due to an insufficient food 
intake. It was found that growth ceased at a time when the 
animals were consuming food in more than sufficient quantity 
to maintain normal growth. In discussing his results Sir 
Frederick remarked: " It is possible that what is absent from 
artificial diets and supplied by such addenda as milk and 
tissue extracts is of the nature of an organic complex (or of 
complexes) which the animal body cannot synthesise. But 
the amount which seems suflicient to secure growth is so small 
that a catalytic or stimulative function seems more likely." 
Sir Frederick was an original member of the Medical Research 
Council. 



414 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



October 5, 1935 



Trade Notes 



ToKALON, Ltd., Chase Road, London, N.W.io, have intro- 
duced a new rouge and lipstick, each selling at a popular price. 

BuRGOYNE, BuRBiDGES & Co., LTD., East Ham, London, 
E., announce a new pack and revised prices for Normo- 
Gastrine. 

RoBOLEiNE. — Oppenheimer, Son & Co., Ltd., Clapham 
Road, London, S.W.g, call the attention of chemists to the 
fact that bonus parcels are available in connection with 
Roboleine. 

Brussels Exhibition award. — Joseph Flack & Sons, Ltd., 
64 Mark Lane, London, E.G. 3, have been awarded three medals 
for their display of crude drugs at the Brussels International 
Exhibition. 

Fertilol brand oil of wheat germ has recently been placed 
on the market by Vitamins, Ltd., 23 Upper Mall, Hammer- 
smith, London, W. It is supplied in five-minim capsules in 
boxes of 100. 

Cocktails. — Lamb & Watt, Ltd., St. Anne Street, Liver- 
pool, will send samples of their cocktails to chemists who write 
for them. These preparations can be sold by chemists with 
wine licences. 

May & Baker, Ltd., manufacturing chemists, Dagenham, 
announce that from October i their business in pharmaceutical 
specialities is to be conducted by Pharmaceutical Specialities 
(May & Baker), Ltd. 

Morning Pride brushless shaving cream, a product of Fairy 
Dyes, Ltd., is distributed by Fassett & Johnson, Ltd., 86 
Clerkenwell Road, London, E.C.i. Some details of a window- 
display competition are given on another page. 

Glazo manicure products. — Eucryl, Ltd., Southampton, 
who are the distributors of the manicure preparations made 
by Glazo, Ltd., are making a bonus offer, particulars of which 
are announced in the company's advertisement. 

Premier bronchial pastilles. — Smith & Co., 132 Borough, 
London, S.E.i, are now making a pastille containing similar 
ingredients to their well-known bronchial lozenge. Premier 
bronchial pastilles, as the new product is called, can be sup- 
plied in the standard pack tins or in bulk. 

Stablond shampoos. — The Stablond Laboratories, Ltd., 10 
Henrietta Street, Cavendish Square, London, W.i, inform us 
that J. C. Gambles & Co., Ltd., 211 Blackfriars Road, Lon- 
don, S.E.I, are now the distributors of Stablond shampoos. 

FoRViL perfumery. — Thomas Christy & Co., Ltd., Old Swan 
Lane, London, E.C.4, have been appointed distributors for 
the perfumery products of the French firm of Forvil, whose 
factory at Nanterre is stated to be one of the largest and best 





t. 

equipped in France. All the glassware is designed by Lalique, 
packing and display material being equally artistic. Three of 
their lines are shown in above illustration and further details 
are given in the advertising pages of this issue. 



Window display contest. — Dubarry Perfumery Co., Ltd., 
Hove, inform us that they are co-operating with the " Daily 
Express " in the shop window display contest (October 7 to 
19), and in addition to the prizes offered Messrs. Dubarry ane 
presenting the following: ist £2^, 2nd £1^. 3rd £10, and ten 
consolation prizes of £s each. 

Allenburys halibut-liver oil. — Allen & Hanburys, Ltd., 
Bethna] Green, London, E.G. 2, are offering halibut-liver oil 
extracted in their manufacturing 
laboratories. The guaranteed 
vitamin A content is 60,000 in- 
ternational units per gm. (blue 
value 1,500), that is 60 times that 
of good cod-liver oil, and vita- 
min D 2,000 international units 
per gni. Allenburys natural hali- 
but-liver oil is packed in amber 
bottles, with a separate dropper 
screw cap, enclosed in an artis- 
tically designed carton. It is also 
available in the form of capsules, 
which are packed in convenient 
fiat boxes containing twenty- 
eight. Each capsule contains 
8,000 international units vitamin 
A, or the equivalent of three tea- 
spoonfuls of good cod-liver oil in 
this vitamin. An attractive 
counter display unit (as shown 

in the illustration) to hold one carton and one box of capsules 
is supplied. 

Grips pastilles. — J. W. Lightbown & Sons, Ltd., are con- 
ducting a competition which wUl create a greatly increased 
demand for Grips. Thomas Christy & Co., Ltd., Old Swan 
Lane, London, E.C4, are the distributors of Grips pastilles to 
the drug trade. 

Gillette razor blades. — Gillette Industries, Ltd., 197 City 
Road, London, E.C.i, are introducing a Christmas pack for 
blue Gillette blades. This wiU contain eight of the usual 
packets of five in a special carton, and it is to be specially 
advertised during December. 

Cellulose handkerchiefs.- — Southalls (Birmingham), Ltd., 
Charford Mills, Saltley, Birmingliam, are issuing attractively 
packed cellulose handkerchiefs, a line which should meet with 
a good demand through chemists during the coming months. 
It should be noted that there are two varieties available — plain 
and antiseptic. 

PiFCO CATALOGUE. — The Provincial Incandescent Fittings 
Co., Ltd., Shudehill, Manchester, and 150 Charing Cross Road, 
London, W.C.2, have issued a new edition of their catalogue. 
It contains illustrations and specifications of oil heaters, fairy 
lights, torches and other limes of interest to chemists. A copy 
of the list is obtainable on application. 

The phosphatase test. — Attention has recently been directed 
to the phosphatase test for the detection of raw or insufficiently 
heated milk in pasteurised milk. This test is conveniently 
carried out with the help of the B.D.H. Lovibond Limitester. 
The British Drug Houses, Ltd., Graham Street, City Road, 
London, N.i, have now issued a booklet for the use of public 
analysts, medical officers of health, and anyone who is con- 
cerned with the efficient pasteurisation of milk. A copy of the 
booklet will be sent on request to any of our readers. 

Halibut-liver oil. — H. R. Napp, Ltd., 3 Clements Inn, 
London, W.C.2, have published a brochure on " Halibut-liver 
Oil." The publication reviews in popular terms the life and 
habits of the halibut, gives data on the halibut fishing indus- 
try, and details of the various methods employed to extract 
the oU from the livers. It also embodies technical details of 
the character and standardisation of the important vitamins 
A and D, a comprehensive specification of a typical high-grade 
oil suitable for therapeutic purposes, and concludes with some 
useful practical suggestions to buyers. A copy of the brochure 
may be obtained free of charge on application. 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



415 



Notices for insertion in this column must be properly 
authenticated. 

SuNTER. — On September 2i, the wife of Robert Sunter, jun. 
(nee Evelyn Cleworth), 26 Springbridge Road, Alexandra Park, 
Manchester, of a daughter. 



Marriages 

Bull — Collins. — At the Church of the Sacred Heart, 
Bournemouth, on September 19, Stephen Bull, chemist and 
druggist, to Marie Collins. 

BuRDON — Eaton. — At St. James's Cathedral Church, Bury 
St. Edmunds, on September 28, Eric Rowland Burdon, eldest 
son of Mr. J. R. Burdon, chemist and druggist (Nunn, Hinnell, 
Clark & Burdon, Ltd., chemists) to Doris E. Eaton. 

Cooke — Eaddie. — At St. Joseph's Church, Hunslet, Leeds, 
on September 18, Michael J. Cooke, M.B., B.Ch., to Mary 
Eaddie, chemist and druggist, daughter of Mr. W. Eaddie, 
Ph.C. 

JoYNER — Waits. — At Wimborne Minster, Dorset, on Sep- 
tember 15, Kennard Bertram Joyner, chemist and druggist, 
to E. L. Waits. 

Keillor — Smail. — At St. John's Church, Perth, on Septem- 
ber 25, Peter Keillor to Isabella Dunn Smail, daughter of Mr. 
J. C. Smail, chemist and druggist. 

Kerr — Taylor. — At the Glasgow University Chapel, on Sep- 
tember 25, the Rev. T. Angus Kerr, M.A., to Jean Taylor, 
chemist and druggist. 

KiLBY — Howard. — At the Parish Church, Luton, on Sep- 
tember 25, Wilfrid Alan Kilby, chemist and druggist, son of 
Mr. H. W. Kilby, chemist and druggist, Farley Hill, Luton, 
to Violet Gertrude Howard. 

Peel — Sykes. — At Providence Congregational Church, 
EUand, on September 18, Malcolm Peel, chemist and druggist, 
Newsome, to Kathleen Sykes. 

Wyatt — Paley. — At St. Anne's Church, Stanley, Liverpool, 
on September 28, by the Rev. J. M. Buckmaster, Harold 
Wyatt, A.R.I.B.A., only son of the late Mr. Harold Wyatt, 
Ph.C, formerly of Bootle, to Mary, only daughter of Mr. J. 
Paley, M.P.S., Fairfield, Liverpool. 



Deaths 



Elton. — At Barnet, on September 28, Mr. Thomas Francis 
Elton, retired chemist and druggist, aged seventy-five. 

Mackay. — At " Tynedale," Gifinock, on September 27, 
Caroline M., beloved wife of Mr. David R. Mackay, Scottish 
representative of Armour & Co., Ltd., St. Martin' s-le-Grand. 
London, E.C.i. 

McGlinchy. — At Walthamstow, London, E., on Septem- 
ber 14, Mr. John Owen McGlinchy, chemist and druggist, aged 
fifty-nine. 

MiDGLEY. — On September 24, Mr. Willie Midgley, chemist 
and druggist, Harehills, Leeds. Mr. Midgley qualified in 1927. 

Norman. — At Bedford, Mr. Joseph Slaughter Norman, 
Ph.C, aged eighty-three. Mr. Norman carried on business 
at 70 Tavistock Street for about fifty years. 

Prior. — At Stamford, on September 21, the wife of Alderman 
J. S. Prior, Ph.C, a former Mayor of the borough. 

Taylor. — -At 38 Muirfield Crescent, Dundee, on October i, 
after a brief illness, Mr. Alexander Nicol Taylor, chemist and 
druggist, 41 Dens Road. Mr. Taylor qualified in 1898. He 
was well known in musical circles in Dundee, and rendered 
valuable services in organising hospital entertainments during 
the war. Mr. Taylor is survived by a widow. 



Business Changes 

Thomas Tomlinson & Son, valuers, have removed from 
46 Victoria Street to Grosvenor Chambers, 33 Blackfriars 
Street, Manchester. 

Patent Phosphates & Merchandise, Ltd., have acquired 
new offices at 323-5-7 Corn Exchange Buildings, Cathedral 
Street, Manchester, 4. 

W. & F. Walker, Ltd., manufacturers of disinfectant pro- 
ducts, have removed from Colonial House to West Africa 
House, 25 Water Street, Liverpool. 

Cavendish Chemical Co. (New York), Ltd., inform us that 
their London address is Oxford Works, Tower Bridge Road, 
London, S.E.i. Telephone: Bermondsey 1141-2-3. 

Mr. William Wallace, chemist and druggist, has taken over 
the business of Mr. Trevor Lloyd Hughes, chemist and 
druggist, 5 Harper Bridge Parade, Uxbridge Road, Middlesex. 

Miss M. Whyte, chemist and druggist, 49 Argyle Street, 
Inverness, has taken over the business lately carried on at 
The Square, Beauly, by Mr. William Eraser, chemist and 
druggist. 



Wills 



Mr. Fred Woodrow Dennis, Eastgate, Louth, Lines, 
chemist and druggist, who died on July 4 last, left estate gross 
value £11,313, with net personalty £8,;^yi. 

Mr. Henry Wootton, The Rowans, Meadow Road, Sutton, 
Surrey, late principal of the London College of Pharmacy, died 
on June 2 last, aged eighty, leaving £7,773, with net personalty 
/5.999- 

Mr. Ralph Martin Bewick, C.B.E., Lyntoncroft, Cater- 
ham, Surrey, formerly a director of the United Alkali Co., 
who died on November 25 last, aged seventy-two, left estate 
gross value ;^i5,72i, with net personalty /i3,o52. 

Mr. Julius Berend Cohen, F.R.S., D.Sc, Coniston, 
Emeritus Professor of Organic Chemistry in the University of 
Leeds, who died on June 14, aged seventy-six, left estate of 
the gross value of ;£i3,902, with net personalty £12,262. 



Coming Events 

This section is reserved for advance notices of meetings or 
other events. These should be received by Wednesday of 
the week before the meetings, etc., occur. 

Tuesday, October 8 

Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain, Southend and District Brancft, 
Chamber of Trade olflces, Soiitheiirl-nn-Ssa. at 8 iO v.m. Mr. P. F. 
Rowsell on " The Activities of the Council of the Society, with Special! 

Reference to Present Conditiniis." 

Wednesday, October 9 

Birmingham Pharmaceutical Association, Botanical Gardens, Edgbaston, 
at 8 p.m. Dance. Vincent Ladbrooke's Band. Tickets, 4s. 6d. each. 

Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain, Newcastle, District and North- 
umberland Branch, Station Hotel, Newcastle. Annual dinner. Recep- 
tion 6.15 for 6.45 p.m. 

Thursday, October 10 

West Ham and Eastern District Association of Pharmacists and Branch 
of the Pharmaceutical Society, Church Institute, 27 Romford Road, 
Stratford, at 7.30 p.m. Social evening. 

Manchester Pharmaceutical Association and Manchester, Salford and 
District Branch of the Pharmaceutical Society. Speech day and 
presentation of prizes to students. Association president's address 
and Conference delegates' report. 



FOKTHCOMING EXHIBITIONS.— -E'pctrodeposit/OH, Science Museum. London, 
S.\V.7, during the month of October. Housing and Health,^ Glasgow, 
October 2 to 26. Medical, Horticultural Hall, London, S.W.I, October 21 
to 25. " ' 



416 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



October 5, 1935 




Teleg-KDns 
A to/eiue 
Sedist. 
London." 



JOHN BELL (brand) 

COLD CURE CAPSULES 

A remedy which brings repeat orders. 1/3 size 9/. doz. 

Snd f,,r S.,ni,ile and I'idl I;, rl,r„l„ , « 

\^ Oxford Worki, Tower Bridge Road, London, S.E.i I 



0"F Phas-macy 

Founded by H. WOOTTON, B.Sc. C. W. GOSLING, Ph.C. 
Principal IRVINE Q. RANKIN, B.Sc, Ph.C. 

Specialists in Training Pharmacists 
NEXT SESSION commences OCTOBER 2nd. 

6 MONTHS PRELIM. SCIENTIFIC. 

9 MONTHS C. & D. QUALIFYING. 

3 MONTHS REVISION P.S. and C. & D. 

Benches now being reserved for P.S. and C. & D. 

^< Essesitiais of Pharmacy'' 

New Edition 6 6 post free. 

361 CLAPHAM ROAD, S.W.9 

Telephone -BRIXTON 2161 



DRAKE %i DAHM (Translators) LTD. 

ALL LANGUAGES ALL SUBJECTS 

SCIENTIFSC AND TECHNICAL 
A SPECIALITY 

PHONE : CENTRAL 3989 

36&37 UPPER THAIViESSTREET,L0S\I00N,£.C.4 



Founder : 
Q. S. V. WILLS, Ph.C. 



P. H. WOODNOTH, Ph.C, F.C.S. 



DAY CLASSES 

New Classes commence October 7th. 
Preliminary Scientific Examination Oct.-March. 
Qualifying Examination Oct. -June. 

REVISION WORK 

Day Classes for both Examinations to December. 
Arrangements made for revision worl< by post. 

190 Clapham Road, London, S.W.9 



• NORTH CIRCULAR 



Reliance 3728 
ROAD, LONDON, N.W.2 • 



VI€NA$E 



WILCOX, JOZEAU 



ORANGE WINE 

SHERRY 

ORANGE QUININE WINE 

JAS. BURROUGH LTD. irB^TT's'-^f^r 

ESTABLISHED 1820 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

COMPACT LIBRARY 



THE CHEMISTS' DICTIONARY OF MEDICAL 

TERMS. 

A small boolc wliicli explains the meaning of medical 
terras as to which customers often inquire from 
chemists. In addition to concise definitions of tliese 
technical terms, notes are given on the treatment of 
the more important ailments. 

Vrice. 3s. 6d., by post 3s. 8d. 

PRACTICAL METHODS OF URINE ANALYSIS. 

Tlie object of tliis boolv is to give chemists exactly 
the information they want on the subject. The 
book was written by a pliarmacist who was an expert 
in this worl;, and has been revised by a medical 
practitioner and lecturer of long experience in clinical 
analysis. (Fourth Edition.) Contains 97 pages. 
Price is., by post 4s. 3d. 

VETERINARY COUNTER PRACTICE. 

Cliemists interested in veterinary practice will find the 
worlt indispensable, as it deals with the ailments of 
horses, cattle, sheep, pigs, dogs, and poultry, and the 
remedies that can be supplied. New edition 1930 
(Eighth) brings this book tlioroughly up to date. 
Pr ice 7s. 6d., by post 8s. 

The C. & D. PRICE LIST FORMULARY, " P.L.F." 

All users of the C. & D. Eetail Dispensing Price 
List require a copy of tliis Formulary. It brings 
together the formulas for unofficial preparations, 
the prices of which are quoted in the Price List. It 
is a choice collection of good formidas for articles in 
everyday request tiy the public. Price 2s. 6d. post free. 

WOOTTON'S CHRONICLES OF PHARMACY. 

In two vols^ maroon cloth, comprising 770 pages. 
Price 10s. 6d., hy post lis. 3d. 

THE PHOTOGRAPHIC CHEMIST. 

This is a concise guide to chemists commencing and 
carrying on a photographic department. 

Price 3s. 6d., by post 'is 8d. 

DISEASES AND REMEDIES. 

Now in its sixth edition (March, 1931). It has been 
carefully revised by an experienced medical practi- 
tioner and parts of the book have been rewritten. 
Price 5s., by post 5s. 3d. 



PUBLISHED BY THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

28 Essex Street, LONDON, W.C.2 

Branch Offices : Manchester and Shaffield, England. 
Glasgow, Scotland. Melbourne and Sydney, 
Australia. Auckland, New Zealand. 



Information Department 

INFORMATION WANTED 

Postal or telephone information with respect to makers or first- 
hand suppliers of the undermentioned articles will be appreciated. 



# TELEPHONES 



GLADSTONE 65t 1-5 # 



T/30. Amyl oxy toluene (ac- 
tual makers) 

C/10. Clear, unsweetened 
orange juice 

T/20. Comet brand cod-liver 
oil 

B/10. Janus plasters 

B/210. Lubrokal 

B / 1 9 . Mercuropurine 



W/27. Ray sol (diabetic treat- 
ment) 

T/19. Streamline depilatory 
(puff pattern) 
Trikalkol 



S/19. 
T/19. 



Washable sanitary towel 
of absorbent sponge 
rubber 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



417 



THE 

Chemist AND Druggist 

VOL. CXXIII. October 5, 1935 NO. 2904 



Renewal of N.H.I. Contracts 

During this month the question of the renewal of chemists' 
National Health Insurance contracts is due for decision. 
It will be interesting to see what will happen to the pro- 
posals that have been put forward when they are considered 
by representatives from Pharmaceutical Committees at 
a conference called by the National Pharmaceutical Union 
for October 30. Pharmacists have reason to fear another 
three years' contract if the Government continue in their 
" heads we win, tails you lose " policy so far as these con- 
tractors are concerned. The aspect of the panel that most 
disturbs pharmacists is the uncertainty of receiving pay- 
ment in full for their work. The chemists' insurance 
contract contains an element of chance which should find 
no place in an agreement with the Government. It is 
common knowledge that the Government have set their 
face against such hazardous ventures as lotteries and 
sweepstakes, and there seems no adequate reason why 
chemists should be singled out for this gamble. As is well 
known, under the present arrangement a certain amount 
is allotted for the contracting chemists' bills. If the total 
of these bills exceeds the pool (as it may well do in an 
epidemic year), the bills are discounted and each chemist 
gets only his proportionate share. In short, the pharmacist 
does his work and takes his chance of receiving full wages. 
No municipal authority would offer a contract of that 
nature to a firm who entered into an agreement with it. 

Chemists' representatives, when negotiating terms for 
the new contract for the period beginning in 1936, should 
endeavour first of all to do away with that bias against the 
chemists. If it can be shown that the present terms are 
not adequate — and that is a task that faces the National 
Pharmaceutical Union at the present time — then the 
Government should be approached and asked to legislate 
accordingly. The 191 1 N.H.I. Act provided certain 
moneys for certain purposes ; but since then various 
financial adjustments have been made to meet changing 
conditions. The contribution rates of insured persons have 
been increased ; different amounts have been apportioned 
for medical treatment; sums paid in sickness benefit have 
been modified. If such changes can be brought about by 
negotiation and legislation when definite need arises, why 
should not chemists' affairs be put on a more satisfactory 
basis ? The Drug Tariff is established on definite principles. 
It is some years since it was drawn up ; and it can be clearly 
shown that the rates of payment specified in it are no 
longer adequate in view of modern developments in medical 
practice and altered economic conditions. That, however, 
is another aspect of the question. While the Drug Tariff 
is of the essence of the contract it should stand in its 
integrity, and chemists should be paid according to its 
provisions and not according to a chance set of circum- 
stances quite outside their control. What approved society 
would consent to a proviso that the amounts payable to 
its members in case of sickness should be left to the luck 
of the moment ? Chemists' representatives should therefore 
insist that pharmacists who contract for insurance dis- 
pensing shall enjoy a right normally inherent in every 
contract, the right to have their bills paid in full. 



Government Chemist's Annual Report 

The report of the Government Chemist upon the work of 
the Government Laboratory for the year ended March 31, 
1935. recently issued by the Stationery Office (price gd.), is, 
except for the matter of totals of samples dealt with and 
similar statistics, very similar to the reports issued for some 
years past. Some few additional minor items are men- 
tioned, but in character and general information it is very 
much according to type. As documents of reference of the 
volume of work performed, these reports are all that could 
be desired ; they might, however, be made much more 
illuminating and instructive. With a general tariff in 
operation, the Clement's Inn Laboratory, in connection with 
this and other similar trade protection legislation, deals each 
year with over half a million samples of merchandise of 
every class and description, and in doing so has an excep- 
tional opportunity to watch the trend of industrial 
development generally. From raw materials right through 
to finished articles, there have been revolutionary changes 
and improvements during the past decade. These all come 
to the notice of the staff of the Government Chemist, and 
some measure of comment each year from this official and 
independent quarter would be of considerable interest. A 
comprehensive review of one or two selected industries 
each year, reviewing the developments in the products of 
those industries over a period of, say, ten years, would be 
of practical use. The pharmaceutical chemical industry, 
as an instance, would provide ample scope for a critical 
review. The experience of the department on such a contro- 
versial subject as tlie desirability or otherwise of permitting 
the freer use of duty-free spirits in industry would be 
welcomed in most quarters. Such a development in the 
scope of these publications would, of course, be an extension 
of policy. For many years past the department of the 
Government Chemist has acted in an advisory capacity to 
all Government departments and is represented on the 
committees of a number of national industrial and 
scientific organisations ; its experience and advice have 
no doubt been of considerable service to industry generally. 

During the year under review samples to the number of 
522,788 were dealt with, compared with 503,592 during 
the preceding twelve months, an increase of 19,196. Of 
these totals, 259,910 were handled at Clements Inn, and 
the remainder were shared equally between Customs House 
laboratory and the provincial chemical stations. Samples 
of chemicals, etc., liable to key industry duty numbered 
10,400, an increase of about 1,200 on the year, which is 
rather surprising. The sale of foreign pharmaceuticals in 
this market is evidently not on the down grade. Under 
the Dangerous Drugs Acts some 55 samples were reported 
on, compared with 38 during the previous twelve months. 
Samples of products liable to hydrocarbon oil duty 
increased by about 3,600 on the twelve months, the latest 
total being 16,912. Under the class " Spirits, duty free, 
including Methylated, specially Denatured, etc.," the total 
number of samples jumped from 3,630 to 5,000 for the year 
ended March 31, 1935. Samples of goods liable to the 
general ad valorem and additional duties under the Import 
Duties Act, 1932, totalled only 16,960, an increase of 
slightly more than 4,000 on the year. These comparatively 
small totals indicate that only a minor percentage of the 
hundreds of thousands of consignments of general mer- 
chandise needed to be sampled for the purpose of analytical 
report. Over 14,400 samples under the heading of 
" Spirituous Preparations Exported (Tinctures, Essences, 



418 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



October 5, 1935 



etc.) " were received and reported on, against about 13,500 
in the preceding twelve montlis. There was a big jump in 
the number of samples of " Imported Spirituous Prepara- 
tions," which totalled over 10,800, an increase of about 
3,500 on the year. The largest total of samples tested is 
credited to the tobacco department, with home, export and 
" drawback on waste " items amounting to 148,780 for the 
year, an increase of about 18,000; evidently tobacco con- 
sumption is still increasing. 

The work of the Laboratory for other Government de- 
partments covers a wide field, consisting of routine testing 
of samples of official stores of all descriptions, continual 
research and furnishing reports in an advisory capacity, 
and reporting on cases of alleged adulteration and fraud. 
For instance, 515 samples were received from the Air 
Ministry during the year, compared with only 195 during 
the previous year; a sign of the times. The samples 
consisted chiefly of metals and alloys used in aircraft 
construction. The Ministry of Health referred 563 samples 
to the Laboratory, mostly under Public Health (Condensed 
Milk) Regulations and the Food and Drugs Acts and 
similar legislation. Reports to the Home Office totalled 
532, and were concerned with foods and medicines suspected 
to contain poisons. Only seven samples connected with 
the Dangerous Drugs Regulations were received from this 
department during the twelve months. About thirty 
samples in connection with police inquiries were also 
reported on. The Inland Revenue made but little use of 
the services of Clement's Inn, sending only twenty -five cases 
for report, compared with 1,364 during the previous twelve 
months. These samples were connected with suspected 
fraudulent use of revenue stamps and documents. The 
figures suggest that the craft of the forger has been 
outwitted by the achievements of modern science. Samples 
of lime and lemon juices analysed under the Mercantile 
Shipping Act numbered 144 ; it would have been interesting 
if the report had specified the number of samples of each 
juice handled, for it is now known that lemon and orange 
juice are much more powerful antiscorbutics than lime juice, 
the latter in its preserved state containing at the most but 
small traces of vitamin C. 

Doctors and Public Medical Services 

It might have been supposed that the recent " boom " in 
public medical services was a matter for unqualified self-con- 
gratulation by medical practitioners throughout the country. 
But in the Supplement to " The British Medical Journal " of 
September 28 there is a closely reasoned article by Dr. McI. 
Johnson, barrister-at-law, stating a case against the extension 
of these services. Dr. Johnson begins by criticising the present 
panel system. He proceeds to suggest that there seems to be 
" a definite reaction against secialised medicine," and that in 
his own district the public medical service " appears to have 
received a distinctly cool reception so far." His idea of what 
should be aimed at is indicated in the following paragraph : — 
" I am prepared to admit the advantages of public medical 
services in the case of the poorer families, whose bread- 
winners earn less than £2> P^r week. I consider, however, 
that every scheme should retain some element of individual 
payment according to services. As a modification of the ■ 
present public medical services I would suggest that the 
central fund should pay the doctor a smaller capitation fee 
— say, 5s. per year — while the patients themselves should 
pay a fixed amount per attendance or visit, even if it were 
only 6d. or is., direct to the doctor ; the central fund would 
keep a special reserve for financial assistance in cases of 
serious and prolonged illness ; and the attendance or visiting 
■ ' fees would be fixeid for each district and each class of patient 
by mutual consent of the dqctors. There would be no harm 
.in. making this type of scheme voluntary fipr dependants of 
all panel patients, as the fees could be proportionately raised 



for the more prosperous class ; also, as I have observed, the 
latter class would tend not to support the scheme. The 
charging of fees for each attendance and visit would, inci- 
dentally, have the merit of preventing any exploitation on 
the part of patients — a far more lively clanger when the 
children come to be included in a contract scheme. The 
public medical services should be kept entirely within the 
control of doctors as they are at present, and no extension 
of compulsory State insurance should be countenanced." 
In the concluding passages of his article Dr. Johnson warns 
his readers against binding themselves to " a fixed pittance on 
a low level of payment " and against allowing the control of 
their profession to drift into the hands of the State. Pharma- 
cists may with advantage consider the implications of this 
thoughtful article. 



"C. & D." Retail Price List 

The index of drug prices for September advanced by 1.4 above 
that of August, the figure being 146.0 in September, as against 
144.6 the previous month and 140.6 for the corresponding 
month in 1934. The changes in ergot prices accounted for some, 
but not all, of the rise, the true explanation being small changes 
spread over several important items ; menthol being one 
example. In the surgical dressings index there were rumours 
of advances, but these had not matured when we went to press, 
and the index therefore remains unchanged at 136.2, against 
136.3 in September 1934. It will be seen that this figure has 
not changed since March of this year ; circumstances may, how- 
ever, arise that will affect prices. To this quarterly revision 
of the price list have been added, in accordance with our prin- 
ciple of keeping the list up to date, several drugs which have 
recently come into common use. 



Marine Insurance 

Schedule of War Risks Rates 

The marine insurance companies and Lloyd's underwriters have 
set up a joint committee for the purpose of fixing rates for 
insuring the risks of war, strikes, riots and civil commotion in 
open covers and open policies. It will be remembered that 
underwriters gave notice cancelling the war risk in open covers 
on September 16, and as that notice became effective after ten 
days the rates fixed by the committee came into force on Sep- 
tember 27. The first schedule of rates, details of which are 
given below, provides that the rates shall not apply to ship- 
ments by vessels under the Italian flag nor to voyages which 
involve loading, calling, or discharging at ports in Italy or in 
Italian possessions, but it is agreed that underwriters may exer- 
cise their discretion in quoting rates for the excluded vessels 
and voyages. A feature of the schedule is that different rates 
are quoted for cargo, specie, and for consignments by registered 
post, but it is to be noted that the rate on specie is identical 
with that on cargo in all but two instances. Owing to the fact 
that the greater part of overseas trade is now insured under 
" open covers " and similar contracts, an enormous amount of 
commerce will be effected by the new rates. These rates will 
also apply in a great number of cases to shipments insured 
under individual policies. It is understood that the rates apply 
only to immediate sailings. The rates given in the schedule are 
liable to withdrawal or amendment without notice. We under- 
stand that shippers are advising buyers that the ordinary c.i.f. 
contract will not cover these risks and charges. 

Schedule 





Cargo 


Specie 


All voyages to, from or via Mediterraneaa and/or Red Sea 


/o 
5s. od. 


% 
2s. 6d. 


Australasia, India, Far East OT'a Cape ... ... 


IS. 6d. 


IS. od. 


South Africa (direct), West Africa, River Plate, West 






Coast of South .\merica ... 


IS. od. 


IS. od. 


Trans-.North Atlantic — U.K. -Continent not south of 






Bordeaux ; Trans-Pacific ; North and/or South and,'or 






Central America to North and/or South and/or Central 






America ; Australasia to Far East and vice versa 


fid. 


6d. 


U.S.A. and/or Canada to U.S.A. and/or Canada ... 




3d. 


U.K. -Continent, including Ulterior (including Northern 


ports but not south of Bordeaux) 


3d. 


3d. 


Registered Post sendings at half specie rates. 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



419 




A Physician's Collection 
of Pharmacy 
Jars 



T 



I HE collecting of pottery 
associated with phar- 
macy differs in one 
respect from most pursuits 
common to collectors. There 
are, no doubt, a few people who collect pharmacy ware as 
they would collect butterflies, stamps or any other objects, 
purely by the criterion of rarity. Their lives are spent in this 
specialised chase: they enjoy its thrills, and to them nothing 
else matters. But there is also the collector of a higher type, 
for whom each object acquired throws some light on the art or 
science in which he is interested, or on some phase of life 
closely related to it. This is, or should be, especially the case 

with the collecting of 
the many kinds of ware 
formerly used in stor- 
ing and dispensing 
medicaments : each of 
these relics takes the 
mind back to usages in 
the practice of medi- 
cine that still possess 
an antiquarian interest 
and, in some instances, 
are associated with his- 
torical events of real 
importance. 

These reflections have 
been suggested by a 
visit to the collection of 
pharmacy jars assem- 
bled by Sir St Clair 
Thomson, M.D., which 
we have had the privi- 
lege of inspecting. If, 
as we gather, the dis- 
tinguished owner of 
these beautiful speci- 
mens has only of late years taken steps to collect pottery in 
earnest, he has shown remarkable judgment in his choice of 
what is valuable and at the same time interesting. With the 
aid of the photographs taken by his permission, we propose to 
give a brief account of the principal features of this notable 
collection, classifying the items by their countries. 

Italian Majolica 

As is well known, there were several important centres for the 
manufacture of pottery in Italy from the fifteenth century to 
the eighteenth, approximately the period during which the 
manufacture of pharmacy ware worth collecting began and 
ended. The earliest part of these four hundred years is repre- 
sented in the collection by an unglazed Orvieto jug of the 
fifteenth century and by other specimens, including a Tuscan 
vessel of the sixteenth century with a fixed lid, its primitive 
decoration including a woman's head (p. 419). The filling of 




EARLY TUSCAN, WITH 
FIXED LID 




this Tuscan jar, which is some- 
what of the chevrette type, 
must have been accomplished 
by means of the hole in the 
bottom, which was afterwards 
corked. 

The early years of the sixteenth century have provided one 
of the " high lights," a pair of Faenza vases (formerly in the 
John Edward Taylor collection) bearing the coat of arms of 
the Gonzaga family (p. 419). These, with their subtle blue 
ground-tone and ornate decoration, are charming in the highest 
degree. To the same century are attributed a pair of Venetian 
albareili, two Sicilian albarelli in majolica, two Faenza albarelli 
with boldy designed heads, and two Caffaggiolo drug jars 
(p. 420) dated 1557. 

Specimens from the seventeenth century include a Gubbio 
vase (1608), a pair of Faenza jars (1613), and one (p. 421) from 
Castel Durante {1624). The last-named is of particular interest 
by reason of the " SPQP " inscribed by the potter. 

Eighteenth-century ware is well represented. Among the 
most brilliant examples is a pair of Savona vases {circa 1750), 
with dark blue landscapes, a coat of arms with crown, a mono- 
gram and the pottery mark (p. 422). A large pear-shaped 
Venetian jar labelled "V. Sambucin," is dated with precision 
May 10, 1779. And there are numerous jars dating from late 
in the century, probably originating from Pesaro. 

Several of the undated specimens claim attention for their 
intrinsic beauty. Among these are a pair of Castelli majolica 
vases with lids ; a large 
Castel Durante pot 
labelled " Mostarda 
(p. 420); an albarello 
showing a bishop but 
with no other indica- 
tion of its use (p. 421); 
and an Urbino ew.er. 

French Pottery 

The assigning of 
dates to specimens is 
usually a hazardous 
undertaking, even for 
experts. As far as we 
are aware, the earliest 
example of French 
pottery in the collec- 
tion is a seventeenth- 
century jar from 

Rouen. A pair of Nevers jars and one labelled " Ell. Len." 
are undated, as also are several from Southern France assigned 
to the eighteenth century (p. 420). A pair of albarelli are 
inscribed " S.F. 1712 " ; and, perhaps most important of all 
among the French specimens, there is a pair of Limoges vases, 
with lids, dating from 1742 (p. 420). The delicacy of the 
design on these vases exemplifies the highest traditions of the 
ceramic art. 

B B* 




TILE OF AN ENGLISH 
APOTHECARY 



420 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



October 5, 1935 




THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



October 5, 1935 



English Pottery 

One of the jars of Lambeth delft, labelled " Ol. Amygd.," 
possesses a special fascination for the historian : its arms are 
those of England without the addition of Scotland or Ireland 
(p. 422). This circumstance raises a question of date which 
might be discussed at length without arriving at any definite 
conclusion. Another example of the Lambeth delft, assigned to 
the seventeenth century, is inscribed " 78 " and shows an angel 
with a full-bottomed wig — a quaint touch reminding us of some 
of the carvings ,seen in medijeval buildings. The eighteenth 
century is strongly represented by drug jars of various sizes, 
some only four inches in height. A heart-shaped plaque bear- 
ing the arms of the Society of Apothecaries of London (p. 419) 
is of considerable interest : it differs in shape from those in the 
London Museum, and it strikes one as being almost too artistic 
in conception for such uses as rolling pills or making ointments. 

Dutch and Spanish Pottery 

Dutch delft is represented by specimens ornamented with 
peacocks and baskets of flowers (p. 421) — a device which was 
widely adopted. A handsome pair of jars bears the name of 
Johannes Harlees ; and one labelled " Elect. Lenitiv." has the 
typical appearance of much of the ware known through collec- 
tions on view in Holland. From Spain are derived some jars of 
Mauresque design, attractive alike for their individuality and 
for their suggestion of the association between the Spaniards 
and the Moors. 

Dr. Ernest J. Parry, F.I.C., has been good enough to con- 
tribute the following paragraphs on 

Majolica Factories 

The brilliant enamelled pottery produced simultaneously in 
the East — in Persia, Damascus and Rhodes, and in the West — in 
the Spanish peninsula, exercised considerable influence in Italy, 

where it became a pro- 
duct of the renaissance of 
y art, generally considered 

\ , the most beautiful of its 

kind ever made. Majolica 
is the Italian name for the 
island of Majorca, where 
this type of ware was 
probably first made. 
Much of its beauty is due 
to the use of oxide of tin 
as the basis of the white 
enamel. This is associ- 
ated with the name of 
della Robbia (r 400-81). 

C a s t e 1 Durante, of 
which fabrique Sir St 
Clair's collection has 
several examples, was one 
of the best known centres 
of production of this 
ware. The inscription 
SPQP found on one jar 
may be due to the fact 
that Urban VIII, who was 
born there, became Pope in 1623, and previous Popes, notably 
Leo X, son of Lorenzo (de Medici) the Magnificent, had used the 
letters in their mottoes, and had them inscribed on contem- 
porary pottery. Pieces are known where the lettering is 
S.P.Q.F., the " Romanus " of the familiar S.P.Q.R. giving 
way to " Florentinus, " Florence being under the rule of the 
Medicis. Possibly the letter P has a similar meaning. 

Cafiaggiolo, another of the famous fabriques, was a Medici 
palace (a castle, in reality) between Florence and Bologna. 
Much of the decoration on the ware, usually including the 




LAMBETH DELFT, WITH ROYAL 
ARMS OF ENGLAND IN POLY- 
CHROME 



Medici arms, was carried out by Luca della Robbia under the 
patronage of Piero de Cosimo del Medici. This was in the 
fifteenth century, but the sixteenth century also produced very 
beautiful ware. 

Faeiiza, in the Var, not far from Cannes, manufactured 
earthenware with a fine white glaze under the patronage of the 
Manfredi family. There were several factories in the town. 





PAIR OF BLUB SAVON A, WITH LANDSCAPES, CORONET. 
INITIALS, AND (AT BASE) POTTERY MARK (LIGHTHOUSE) 

and some of the finest of the sixteenth-century pieces were 
decorated by Baldasara Manara. The arms on the two vases 
from the Taylor Collection are those of the Gonzaga, who in 
1530 was invested with the title of Duke and Sovereign of 
Mantua, the family having previously been hereditary 
marquises. A modern factory still exists. 

The Gubbio factory produced some of the finest examples of 
the ceramic art — that is, in earthenware. Maestro Giorgio gave 
it its reputation with his masterpieces in lustre "reflets 
metalliques." A Gubbio dish dated 1524 from the Taylor Col- 
lection — from which the pair of Faenza vases of the sixteenth 
century above mentioned were obtained — fetched £2,8^5 when 
put up at Christie's. The Gubbio vase dated 1608 is a note- 
worthy piece, as this factory was making beautiful pots and 
vases at this period. 

The difficulty of assigning dates to Nevers ware is made all 
the greater because the records of decorators are very scanty 
and no one with the initials S.F. can be traced. In regard 
to the Dutch delft specimens, they undoubtedly belong to 
the Pottery founded in 1680 by J. Pynacker, under the name 

De Porceleyne Fles " (The Porcelain Bottle), and Johannes 
Harlees decorated here during the years round about 1770. 

The Illustrations 

The following is a brief description of the illustrations on 
pp. 420-21 : — • 

1. Italian majolica: one pair dated 1557 ; one seventeenth- 

century pair ; (centre) one dated 1613. 

2. Castel Durante, in blue and yellow: height 15 inches. 

3. Spanish, dark blue, without inscriptions. 

4. Orvieto, Caffaggiolo, unglazed. 

5. French: (outside pair) Nevers, bleu Persan ; (inside pair) ■ 

Limoges, dated 1742 ; (centre) Southern French. 

6. (Upper row) Lambeth delft ; (lower row) Liverpool (with 

bird) and Bristol delft. 

7. Dutch delft. 

8. (Left) Castel Durante, with saint and " SPQP," dated 

1624 ; (right) Italian, with bishop. 

The pair of vases at the head of the article are dark blue 
Faenza, from the John Edv^fard Taylor collection (Christie's, 
1912), with the arms of the Gonzaga family of Mantua and the 
initials " S.H." The four remaining illustrations are described 
in their respective positions in the text. In their selection the 
owner had the assistance of Mr. C. J. S. Thompson. 

We are much indebted to Sir St Clair Thomson for the 
opportunity of giving some account of a collection hitherto 
only known to a few experts, but ranking with the most famous. 



October 5, 1935 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



423 



Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain 

Council Meeting 



There was little other than routine business at the monthly 
meeting of the Pharmaceutical Society, held at i6 Bloomsbury 
Square, London, W.C.i, on October 2. Most of the members 
were present, but apologies for absence were received from the 
treasurer (Mr. E. T. Neathercoat), Sir Humphry Rollestoa and 
Sir Malcolm Delevingne, and it was stated that the last-named 
was detained in Geneva. The president made sympathetic refer- 
ence to the death of Mr. S. F. Burford of Leicester, who died 
at the age of eighty-one on August 29. He recalled that until 
recently Mr. Burford was chairman of the Leicester and Leices- 
tershire Branch of the Society, and was also a Fellow of the 
Institute of Chemistry. The president extended a cordial wel- 
come to Mr. Bennett, chairman of the North British Execu- 
tive, who was attending the Council meeting, observing that 
it was the wish of the Council to work in close co-operation 
with the Executive. 



Tuesday's Proceedings 

Among the business dealt with at the meetmg held on 
October i were the following items : — 

A letter was read from Mr. J. Rutherford Hill containing 
a proposal of the North British Executive that the names of 
persons removed from the Register should be published in 
" The Pharmaceutical Journal." This would prevent prospec- 
tive employers engaging unregistered persons, and would also 
enable manufacturing and wholesale houses to know whether 
or not a person ordering ' ' dangerous ' ' drags was entitled to 
be in possession of them. The letter contained an alternative 
suggestion that the list of removals supplied to the Ministry 
of Health by the Society might be circulated to wholesale 
houses. The Council decided that the difficulties in the way 
of keeping the list up to date were such as to make the 
proposal impracticable. 

The Council considered a proposal of the North British 
Executive, suggesting that the Council should call the atten- 
tion of the Customs and Excise authorities to the obscure terms 
used to disclose the formulas of proprietary medicines claiming 
exemption from medicine stamp duty, and should recommend 
that recognised technical terms only, such as those of the 
B.P. or B.P.C., should be used. The secretary was instructed 
to obtain the views of the National Pharmaceutical Union on 
the suggestion. 

The secretary reported that Section 25 (5) of the Pharmacy 
and Poisons Act provided for the appointment of the Society's 
inspectors by local authorities to inspect the premises of listed 
sellers of poisons. All local authorities had been circularised 
to ascertain how many desired to use the Society's inspectors. 
Oi 172 authorities who had replied there were ten who desired 
to appoint the Society's inspectors. It was agreed that the 
number was not sufficiently large to justify any increase in 
the number of inspectors unless experience showed that this 
was necessary. 

Elections and Restorations 

Sixty-four persons were elected student-associates, and seven- 
teen persons were restored to the Register of Chemists and 
Druggists. The secretary reported that 100 persons had been 
restored to the Register of Chemists and Druggists since the 
August meeting of the Council. Authority was given by the 
Council for the removal from the Register of certain names 
of persons who had not complied with the demand for pay- 
ment of the retention fee. The registrar reported that 317 
persons had been registered as apprentices or students. 

Council Prizes' 

The President reported that eleven candidates entered for 
the Council Prizes competition, and that, upon the recom- 
mendation of the examiners, he had awarded the Pereira 
medal to Frank Raymond Bradbury, Daventry, the Society's 



silver medal to Herbert Leslie Frederick Walton, Lincoln, and 
the Society's bronze medal to Charles Edward Waterhouse. 

Boards of Examiners 

The following were appointed members of the Board of 
Examiners for England and Wales for the ensuing year: — 
Frederick R. C. Bateson, Cecil E. H. Bawn, Harry Berry, 
Oscar L. Brady, Harry Brindle, James H. Brinkworth, Joshua 
H. Burn, Barbara Colson, Charles E. Corfield, Harold Davis, 
James M. F. Drummond, Allan H. Ferguson, Felix E. Fritsch, 
Stephen Furnival, James Grier, Charles H. Hampshire, 
Reginald St. A. Heathcote, Frederick Hemming, Fred C. 
Highfield, Thomas G. Hill, Arthur St. G. J. McC. Huggett, 
Patrick H. Kirkaldy, Herman J. Kluge, Wilfred H. Linnell, 
A. D. Macdonald, Herbert O. Meek, Frederick H. Newman, 
Edwin A. Owen, Arthur D. Powell, Ernest Preston, T. Slater 
Price, Joseph H. Priestley, Alexander O. Rankine, Donald 
H. Richardson, Edward J. Salisbury, George R. A. Short, 
James Small, Frank S. Spring, Walter Stiles, George A. Suther- 
land, Archibald L. Taylor, David Thoday, George E. Trease, 
Arthur M. Tyndall, Thomas E. Wallis, Harry W. Webb, 
Frederick E. Weiss, Robert W. Whytlaw-Gray, Kenneth E. N. 
Williams, Arthur E. Young. 

The following were appointed members of the Board of 
Examiners for Scotland for the ensuing year: — Mary McD. 
Bain, Joseph J. Blackie, James Carruthers, John Dall, Henry 
Dryerre, John Giknour, Matthew V. Hunter, Robert E. 
Hunter, James P. Kendall, Ernest B. Ludlam, Mary Morrison, 
Alexander NeLson, James Paton, William W. Smith, Andrew 
Wilson. 

Benevolent Fund Committee 

The report of the Benevolent Fund Committee showed that 
twenty-two apphcations had been considered since the last 
meeting, and grants made or now recommended ranged from 
;^io to £39. The secretary submitted a statement showing that 
the number of annuitants on the list last October was forty-two 
and that four had been added in December. Of these, seven 
had since died, leaving on the list thirty-nine annuitants, who 
were receiving a total of £1,771 per year. The Committee 
recommended that an election of six annuitants on the Bene- 
volent Fund take place on December 4 at 3 o'clock, and that 
there be no contest for the six places. Several special contri- 
butions were acknowledged. 

Mr. Antcliffe paid a tribute to those who had contributed, 
and expressed the hope that others would help the Fund, which 
was now in especial need of augmentation. 

Education Committee 

The report of the Education Committee, presented by Mr. 
RowsELL, showed that the qualifications of the proposed 
teachers of physiology in the approved schools had been re- 
viewed. 

The Committee felt that the time had now arrived when the 
whole question of the present position and future arrangements 
for the diplomas in biochemical analysis and pharmaceutical 
analysis should be reviewed, and decided to ask the respective 
subcommittees to submit reports. Among other matters dealt 
with were several applications for approval of full-time courses 
of instruction for the Preliminary Scientific examination, for 
approval of conditions in hospitals and manufacturing pharma- 
ceutical laboratories for persons wishing to undergo a practical 
course of study under articles of pupilage, together with several 
applications for exemptions in respect of certain of the require- 
ments of the Examination Regulations under Regulation 30. 

International Congress of Medicinal, Aromatic and 
Similar Plants 

A report was received from Mr. T. E. Wallis stating that 
in connection with the recent International Exhibition held at 
Brussels an International Agricultural Congress was arranged 
under the aegis of the Belgian Ministry of Agriculture. This 
Agricultural Congress was subdivided into several sub- 
congresses, of which the Fifth International Congress of 



424 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



October 5, 1935 



Medicinal, Aromatic and Similar Plants was one. The 
Medicinal Plant Congress was attended by about i8o delegates 
from all parts of the Continent. At the Exhibition of Speci- 
mens in one of the halls of the Brussels Exhibition about fifty 
firms exhibited specimens of drugs and of plants used for the 
production of essential oils, tannins, etc.; there was, however, 
no exhibit by a British firm, although certain British firms 
had been approached by the secretary, M. Denolin, with a 
view to securing some rep:<esentation of the industry in this 
country. 

War Auxiliary Benevolent Fund 

The report of the War Auxiliary Benevolent Fund Com- 
mittee stated that three applications had been considered, and 
grants made of £ig, £26 and lig los. respectively. 

Finance Committee 

The financial statement showed that the receipts since the 
last meeting, including a balance of £^1 12s. yd., amounted to 
;i^3 1,131 8s., comprising the following items: — Retention fees, 
£'^21 IIS. 6d.; subscriptions, £yz os. 6d.; College — School of 
Pharmacy, ;^3,07j 8s. 2d.; College — Pharmacological Labora- 
tories, £2^1 5s.; registration fees, ;^474 17s.; restoration fees, 
£T.2b ; examination fees, ;^5,58i i6s.; penalties and expenses, 
;^83 19s.; interest on deposit, £9> 4s. 3d.; rentals, ;^i5i,iis. 3d.; 
" Pharmaceutical Journal," £2,^^^ 6s. 6d.; Pharmaceutical 
Press, ;^i,743 17s. 3d.; Quarterly Journal, £^ 3s.; telephone fees 
refunded, £1 63. 6d.; F.S.S.U. contributions, ;£35 4s.; sale of 
library books, £'^ 5s. 6d.; transferred from deposit account, 
^16,550. Payments ordered at the last meeting amounted to 
;^i6,o84 i8s., and £x^,ooo had been transferred to the Building 
Fund, leaving a balance of £i\(> los. The balances on the other 
accounts were : — Benevolent F'und (current account) , 
£S6 i2s. 7d.; Benevolent Fund (donation account), £2 2S. 6d.; 
War Auxiliary Benevolent Fund, £2,9 6s. 8d.; Hills Orphan 
Fund, /43 os. 7d.; Orphan Fund, ;^35 iis. 3d. Accounts 
amounting to £9,9^^ 12s. 8d. were passed for payment, and the 
action of the secretary in making payments amounting to 
;^2,53i 1 6s. gd. was approved. 

Law Committee 

The report of this Committee, presented by Mr. Beardsley, 
stated that in England and Wales, since the last report, 
1,207 shops have been visited ; of these 816 were chemists' 
shops. In all the chemists' shops certificates were ex- 
hibited. At nine of the remaining 391 shops visited certain 
infringements of the Pharmacy Acts were reported. In Scot- 
land, since the last report, sixty-six shops have been visited, 
sixty-three of which were chemists' shops. In all the chemists' 
shops certificates were exhibited. 

This was all the public business. 

Opening of College of Pharmacy 

The ninety-fourth session of the Society's College of Pharmacy 
was opened on the afternoon of October 2 in the Examination 
Hall at 16 Bloomsbury Square. The president (Mr. E. Saville 
Peck) was in the chair, and the other occupants of the platform 
were Sir Frederick Gowland Hopkins, Mr. P. F. Rowsell, Mr. 
A. R. Melhuish, Dr. K. Coward, Professor Burn, Mr. H. Berry, 
Mr. T. E. Wallis, Dr. W. H. Linnell. 

The President extended a cordial welcome to the large 
gathering, and said the afternoon's programme was of a rather 
complex nature. He then gave a brief description of the 
various scholarships and proceeded to distribute the awards to 
the successful students (see C. &- D.. August 10, p. 172, 
August 17, p. 233, and p. 423 of this issue). 

Dean's Report 

The following are the principal passages in the Dean's 
report : — ■ 

An annual report presented on an occasion like this is apt 
to become stereotyped. Since physiology only becomes a part 
of the curriculum in the year now beginning, I have till now 
had little share of the teaching in the School myself, and am 
therefore freer to speak of it than I shall be in the future. 

I think it can be said with confidence that the teaching in 
all departments is vigorous, thorough, and for the most part 
cheerful. The atmosphere of the laboratories where the prac- 
tical work goes on is not one of idleness, but one of uninter- 
rupted activity in which no time seems to be wasted. I often 



compare the great industry here with the much easier condi- 
tions under which I worked as a student, when few minded 
whether an exercise was completed or whether the result was 
correct. 

Since a year ago Mr. Berry had been here for two terms 
only, it seems right to say on this occasion how much his 
cheerful and tactful activity contributes to the general 
atmosphere. Mr. Berry smiles and works and so sets an 
example to all of us in both respects. 

Research work is proceeding in all five departments of the 
College, and there are six students working for the degree 
of Ph.D. During the last year, twenty-one research papers 
have been published. 

The increase in the number of students recorded a year ago 
was continued in the session which has just closed, when there 
were eighty-seven students in the College. Of these, fifty-five 
entered for the Chemist and Druggist Qualifying examination, 
and thirty-eight passed. This number does not include those 
who have just taken the September examination. The five 
students who entered for the B.Pharm. degree of London 
University were all successful, and of the six who entered for 
the Pharmaceutical Chemist examination, two passed and two 
have obtained the Chemist and Druggist qualification. 

The President then called upon Sir Frederick Gowland 
Hopkins to give the 

Inaugural Address 

[Abstract] 

The more responsible the calling the higher should be the 
standards, alike in education and in practice, and British phar- 
macy is surely fortunate in possessing, in the Pharmaceutical 
Society of Great Britain, a representative body of which the 
aim — to-day so successfully fulfilled — has been to maintain 
standards which make for the dignity of the calling, and earn 
for it the respect of the public. It is a circumstance bringing 
much advantage and satisfaction to me personally, that the 
invitation to address you on this occasion has led me to become 
better acquainted than before with the activities of the Society. 
They impress me, alike by the extent of their influence and 
their success, and I will add by their wisdom. 

I would like to speak first in praise of the Society's educa- 
tional policy, of which the thoroughness and efficiency, in- 
adequately known by me till now, and I fear not fully recog- 
nised by many others of my kind, are remarkable. The stan- 
dards it imposes are undeniably high, and I am aware that 
there are some at least who, placing emphasis on the special 
conditions in which the average pharmacist in this country 
practises his calling, and the peculiar commercial services which 
the British public is accustomed to expect from him, maintain 
that such extensive educational demands — on the scientific side 
at any rate — may outran the needs of practice, and impose an 
undue burden on the efforts and time of the beginner. 

Vocational Needs 

Educational problems as a whole are, ol course, too big to be 
discussed here ; but there is an aspect of policy I would like 
you to consider as being of importance in the general tenor of 
my remarks. How soon should the vocational element enter 
into educational courses? It is often urged that the true func- 
tion of education is to train the mind to think rightly rather 
than to store it with facts. There is, of course, much truth in 
this, especially in the case of children and adolescents. But 
technical or vocational teaching has to follow at some moment, 
and the greater knowledge required for a chosen career the 
longer the time which must be spent upon it. In the case of 
learned professions or callings based upon science, with which 
the pursuit of pharmacy is surely to be classed, a specialised 
intellectual background should be acquired before practice 
begins. 

Now it has been often said that science can only be taught 
properly when it is taught as pure science without reference to 
its applications, though this dictum is less heard to-day than it 
used to be. It is justified to this extent, that vocational needs 
must not make the teaching of a science so one-sided that the 
student risks missing the intellectual stimulus which the great 
generalisations of science provide. I am personally sure, how- 
ever, that the skilful teacher of students whose ultimate aim is 
to apply science in practice can illustrate general principles 
adequately while selecting facts and aspects which have a per- 
manent vocational value. For the encouragement of the 
average student it is indeed important that the reality of this 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



425 



permanent value should be part of his faith. It was because 
it had become really scientific that the medical knowledge of 
another country received for a long period and up to the time 
of the war the greatest respect in the world, and it was because 
its chemists were so thoroughly trained in tlieory that the same 
country obtained, among other similar advantages, a long lead 
in the production of synthetic drugs, which, lightly or wrongly, 
brought it enormous profits. 

Certain Articles of Faith 

First, I believe that for the student of pharmacy, no less than 
for the student of medicine, the chief gain from the science 
teaching which must precede practical activities is in the scien- 
tific attitude of mind which it creates and in the special intel- 
lectual background it provides which, even when a mass of 
detail is forgotten, remains a valuable possession. But I also 
believe that when teachers and examiners are wise, this most 
desirable result can be obtained by teaching which is essen- 
tially vocational and largely confined to aspects of scientific 
knowledge which are of permanent and practical value. 

A more recently acquired article of faith with me is one wh-ich 
the present occasion has established. I have been reading the 
educational pages in the Society's calendar, and, while recog- 
nising my limitations as a critic, I feel justified in my belief 
that those pages reveal a policy based upon sound judgment. 

I certainly find myself among those who wholly approve of 
those additions which are now about to take their place in the 
curriculum. That the biological teaching should at this time 
be extended on its animal side is only logical. When vegetable 
drugs and preparations of vegetable origin bulked so largely 
in the Pharmacopoeia the prominence of botany in the curri- 
culum was justified. With the immense development of 
glandular or hormonic therapy conditions have altered. It is 
clearly desirable that all who may have concern with the pre- 
paration and the standardising of organic therapeutic prepara- 
tions and the distribution of the countless proprietary prepara- 
tions of this class, should possess, no less than those who 
prescribe them, an adequate knowledge of the nature and 
functions of the various organs from which they are derived, 
as well as of the bodily functions they control. 

Vitamin Products as Foods or Drugs 

Scarcely different is the case of vitamins ; indeed it is 
nearly, if not quite, justifiable to look upon a vitamin as a 
hormone which the body cannot make for itself, or on a hor- 
mone as a vitamin which it does make for itself. Vitamins, 
like hormones, have been highly commercialised. There is 
this difference, that in the former, commercial preparations 
take two forms. When such a preparation contains this or 
that vitamin in relatively low concentration, it may pose as 
a desirable food. When, on the other hand, the vitamin is 
highly concentrated, or when, as is now possible in a few 
cases, it is marketed in a pure form, we tend to think of it 
as a drug, as a therapeutic agent in a narrower sense. The 
actual value of vitamin therapy yet awaits a final judgment. 
No one to-day doubts that each of a group of these substances 
must be present in very small yet adequate amount in any 
diet which is to provide ideal nutrition, but how far is the 
administration of any one of them in a concentrated form 
useful or desirable? It is sure in the case of any of the 
definite so-called deficiency diseases, scurvy, rickets, beri-beri 
and others which are known to follow upon an error in the 
diet, that the patient may recover more quickly from the 
administration of a concentrated preparation of an appropriate 
vitamin than from a correction in his diet alone. But how 
far do conditions of ill health exist which, while less obviously 
related to lack of some one known vitamin or of vitamins in 
general, may yet, for reasons at present obscure, benefit from 
vitamin therapy? Most are aware, for instance, that vitamin 
A is by many held to increase the resistance of the body to 
certain forms of infection. The field of this influence may be 
limited, but I believe it exists. There may be individuals 
who, owing to some physiological peculiarity, require a larger 
supply of this or that vitamin than is contained in a diet 
which by ordinary criteria would be deemed satisfactory. 

The trouble indeed for all of us who, from any standpoint, 
have to think about or deal with hormones and vitamins, 
whether as physiologist, biochemist, clinician or pharmacist, 
is the present great complexity in the facts concerning them. 
Knowledge concerning the control of the body by a multi- 



plicity of hormones with complicated inter-relations is growing 
daily, and the literature dealing with research on vitamins has 
of late contained as many as a thousand papers in a year. 
Only the specialist can deal with such an output ; but the 
fact that substances of the kind are intruding into thera- 
peutics in such an overwhelming way makes it highly desirable 
that the pharmacist should be aware of the essential facts re- 
lating to their origin, distribution and action, as well as full 
acquaintance with their chemical properties. It is for this 
reason that 1 think the introduction of animal physiology 
into the courses of the College is so justifiable and so timely. 
In thus widening the ground of study those responsible have 
shown themselves to be courageous as well as wise. 

Commercial Dominance During Apprenticeship 
One may remark here that all students of pharmacy who 
hereafter obtain a major qualification will have whatever 
satisfaction is involved in knowing that the dilierence between 
their own scientific training and that of the average medical 
student is approaching a vanishing point. In parenthesis 
there is, of course, a stage in the education of students of 
pharmacy on which I have not touched. A judgment on its 
importance is indeed outside my competence. I mean the 
period of apprenticeship. I see the necessity for this period 
in the present position of pharmaceutical practice in Great 
Britain, and I cannot deny the practical importance of what 
is then taught. Speaking, however, as one whose mind has 
doubtless an academic bias, I will just hint at a fear that, 
as most students pass through this stage of their training 
when very young and impressionable, there is some danger 
that owing to the relative dominance of commercial interests 
in their surroundings, which is in most cases unavoidable, 
they may emerge from their pupilage with a belief that 
scientific interests are, for them, exotic, or at least not neces- 
sary for success. You will agree, I hope, that the modern 
employer should do his best to dispel that belief. 

Research at the College 

I would like now to refer to other activities of the Society 
and its College. I will only refer to some more recent re- 
searches, such for instance as those receiving comment in the 
annual report for 1934. In the section of that report which 
comes from the Department of Chemistry, its director. Dr. 
Linnell, describes inter alia a research by himself and col-, 
leagues bearing upon the relation between chemical constitu- 
tion and physiological action. 

Now I want here to make a claim for my own subject — 
biochemistry — as being fated to intrude with effect into this 
interesting field. Now modern biochemistry deals with some- 
thing more than the nature of substances to be found in dead 
tissues. It is fast acquiring methods which enable it to follow 
the progress of the invisible molecular events which occur in 
the tissues while they are living. I must not stop to illustrate 
or enlarge upon this bold claim, but I am certain that bio- 
chemistry is now progressing on lines which in the future, 
perhaps a somewhat distant future, will enable it to describe 
in detail the numerous chemical reactions which proceed in 
ordered sequence and relations in every living tissue cell. 
Now while the influence of some few drugs may be physical, 
I believe the great majority act by intruding among these 
chemical reactions and by modifying their course ; or again 
by entering into relations with the enzymes which catalyse 
those reactions. Now when we know into what kind of a 
reaction and at what stage in its progress a given kind of 
molecule intrudes, or, in another case, know exactly the 
chemical nature of the enzyme with which, owing to mutual 
structural affinities, it makes efficient contact, then we shall 
be in a much better position for understanding just why the 
details of its molecular structure confer upon each drug a 
particular physiological activity. This applies of course to 
the activity of hormones and vitamins, as well as to that of 
drugs. I do not suggest that this at present somewhat esoteric 
side of biochemistry is yet the concern of the student of 
pharmacy, or even of the pharmacologist ; but I think it will 
become of much interest to them in the future. 

But in making this claim for my own subject I have dieressed 
too long from the work of the College departments. The re- 
searches of the Department of Nutrition are mainly concerned 
with vitamins, and have contributed and continue to contribute 
much of importance to our knowledge. To its director. 



426 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



October 5, 1935 



Dr. Katherine Coward, other investigators owe a debt of 
great magnitude. The department had done great public 
service by undertaking to determine by biological assay the 
vitamin concentrations in a large variety of foods and other 
material. 

The problems which come before the Department of Phar- 
macognosy are, as might be expected, very various, and often 
call for much ingenuity in the choice of methods for their solu- 
tion, and even when they are essentially practical in aim they 
may call for research often difficult in kind. Its director, Mr. 
Wallis, makes this clear in the 1934 report. 

To the Department of Pharmacology Professor Burn's 
reputation has attracted many students from abroad. It is, 
and has long been, one of great activity in research. The 
Professor's own recent researches into the function of vaso- 
dilator fibres, for instance, are now classical, and further pro- 
gress in these is described in the 1934 report. Much important 
work is done in this department on the standardisation of 
hormones, partly as research and partly in routine examina- 
tions, and they have also been extended to the standardising 
of many drugs. 

Research Affects Teaching 

I am one of those — and they are many — who believe that 
in every centre where science is taught research should be 
active. It is no theoretical view, but a belief based upon wide 
experience, that the pursuance of research within a department 
vitalises its teaching. It compels the teacher to keep in touch 
with progress, and keeps his mind alert. It creates an atmos- 
phere from which every student directly and indirectly benefits. 

Apart from this influence of research upon teaching, the 
publication of original work from any department awakens the 
interest of the scientific world in that department, makes it 
known and gives it distinction. That is a service which their 
output of new knowledge has already done for the departments 
of this College, individually and collectively. It will continue 
with that service to an extent which will increase with increase 
in the opportunities afforded it. I have seen the laboratories 
at present available for all this departmental research, and am 
inclined to wonder how such good work could have been done 
with accommodation which cannot be called adequate. I very 
much hope that there will be found in Brunswick Square 
accommodation and equipment on a more generous scale. 

In these times of social and economic changes only one 
prophecy can be safely made concerning the future of pharma- 
ceutical practice in this country, namely, that it too will 
sufler changes. Many of the younger members of the calling 
look, I am sure, to its becoming, in a more complete and secure 
sense than now, a profession. If trade be a calling in which 
material goods are sold and a profession one in which know- 
ledge is sold— and this seems to be one essential difference 
between them — then I am sure that the professional side of 
pharmacy is fated greatly to increase in this country. 

Therapeutics of the Future 

It is difficult now, as always, for those who serve the public 
to avoid supplying it with what it demands. The general 
public to-day, and not its humbler sections alone, is lor the 
most part too ignorant to be protected from the influence of 
the advertisements incessantly before its eyes, which proclaim 
the supposed merits of a crowd of quack nostrums or expensive 
proprietary articles of little real value. There are many indi- 
vidual pharmacists to-day who I know do their best to protect 
it from such, and there are committees in being to-day, on one 
of which your president, and, I suspect, other members of the 
Society, are sitting, which are considering possible remedies 
for the evil. But the problem involved in combating it, 
whether by State action or otherwise, is an extremely difficult 
one, as all who face it come to realise. 

But biological science is gaining a foothold in general educa- 
tion. It is beginning in schools and is increasing its influence 
in the Universities. The time is not far distant when even 
average members of the community will know much more 
about their bodies and their bodily functions than they know 
to-day, and will no longer display the faith which is bom of 
ignorance. When ill they will, of course, go to the medical 
man for diagnosis and for guidance, but I believe that there 
are matters concerning which they will seek knowledge from 
the pharmacist to an increasing extent, knowing that it will be 
knowledge based on scientific truth. 



I will even venture to suggest that owing to the increasing 
specialisation in knowledge and its applications which modern 
progress demands, the future may see certain readjustments 
in medical practice which will make it easier for the British 
pharmacist to assume that more definitely professional status 
which he now occupies in certain other countries. I touch 
here, however, on difficult and delicate ground. It would be 
idle to speculate further on lines such as these ; we can but 
very imperfectly foresee the march of events. But of this I 
am sure : the status of practical pharmacy in this country will 
rise with the rise in its standards of education. The young men 
will see to that. 

Vote of Thanks 

Professor H. E. Armstrong, in proposing a vote of thanks, 
introduced a jocular note by describing Sir Frederick Gowland 
Hopkins as an interloper. More and more as years went by he 
realised the astounding things Sir Frederick had added in 
modern scientific inquiry. Sir Frederick was a pioneer worker 
in modem " natural " pharmacy, and he asked those present 
to think of what that was going to lead to in the end. If the 
beginning Sir Frederick had made and the views he had put 
forward were trae, where would they be in the not very distant 
future? (Laughter.) Dmgs would not be required, except 
those which were contained in the cabbage and other vege- 
tables. Sir Frederick had initiated a stmggle between the drug- 
gist and the dmg giver, and the man who lived by nature, 
on nature, and by nature's products. If Sir Frederick was 
right, the medical profession would have to be reorganised as 
health-givers ; they would merely tell the ignorant what they 
should eat " and things like that." The pharmaceutical 
profession was in difficulties, and its members did not know 
where they were going. As tradesmen they were the only 
tradesmen who were highly educated, and some day that would 
be accounted to their advantage. The student should be re- 
lieved of a very great burden in the future. All the scientific 
stuff and synthetic material would be put aside, and he would 
quietly garden during the day and make his money during the 
shady part of the evening. (Laughter.) Within a very reason- 
able period of time they would have to regard the whole 
educational problem from a very much broader point of view 
than to-day, and scientific workers would come down to the 
level of commonplace intelligence. (Laughter.) His complaint 
was that the work of pharmacists was not recognised ; they did 
not occupy the position which the training they got should 
give them. But eventually it was going to tell. (Applause.) 

Mr. Bennett (chairman of the North British Executive), 
seconding, said the education of the pharmacist was and 
had been a very important thing. Sir Frederick Hopkins had 
shown the great advantages that might accrue from further 
education, and he had also shown the necessity for further 
education if the pharmacists were to make progress. 
(Applause.) 

North British Executive 

A MEETING of the Executive of the North British Branch of the 
Pharmaceutical Society was held at 36 York Place, Edinburgh, 
on Wednesday, September 25, Mr. F. W. M. Bennett in the 
chair. A list of divisional secretaries for appointment by 
the Council for 1936 was approved, the only changes being: — 
Mr. J. S. Miller, 43 Victoria Street, Rothesay, in place of Mr. 
William Meldnim, retired, for the County of Bute ; Mr. W. C. 
Cochran, 10 Mill Street, Catrine, in place of Mr. T. G. Coch- 
rane, resigned, for the Northern division of the County of Ayr ; 
Mr. John Eraser, 84 High Street, Dumfries, in place of Mr. 
James Reid, resigned, for the County of Dumfries ; Miss 
Margaret G. Boag, 61 Montrose Terrace, in place of Mr. G. 
Hedderwick, resigned, for the East division of Edinburgh ; Mr. 
John Caldwell, 513 Springburn Road, Glasgow, in place of 
Mr. M. M. Newall, deceased, for the Springburn division of 
Glasgow. 

It was reported that arrangements were being made to hold 
the usual winter session of evening scientific meetings in Edin- 
burgh. Professor Ivan de Burgh Daly, M.A., M.D., B.Ch., 
Professor of Physiology in the University of Edinburgh, would 
give the inaugural sessional address, his subject being "Arti- 
ficial and Natural Regulation of Body Function." 

The public medical and pharmaceutical service schemes in 
conjunction with the British Medical Association in Edinburgh 
and in Ayr County were reported to be working satisfactorily, 
and the scheme was gradually extending to other areas. 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



427 



Grocers Enlightened on the Poisons Rules 



THE issue of " The Grocer " for September 28 contains, 
among other matters relating to the recent Grocers' 
Exhibition and Market at the Royal Agricultural Hall, 
London, N.i, a lengthy report of an address by Mr. M. D. 
Perrins, secretary of the Poisons Board, given at the confer- 
ence of secretaries of grocers' associations affiliated to the 
National Federation of Grocers' Associations. The following 
abstract embodies the points of general interest to our 
readers : • — 

Mr. Perrins's Address 

The Poisons Board has prepared a Poisons List and Rules to 
be made under the Act to establish that control which was 
left by the Act to be effected by Rules. The draft List and 
Rules (I say " draft " because the Home Secretary has yet 
to confirm the List and to make the Rules) have been pub- 
lished, and certain representations have been made to the Home 
Secretary, including some from your Federation, in regard to 
them. These representations are now under careful considera- 
tion. It is perhaps unfortunate that the date of this meeting 
has so fallen that it is not possible for me to talk to you on the 
basis of the final Poisons List and Rules and that I can only 
speak, therefore, on the basis of the draft Poisons List and 
Rules submitted to the Home Secretary by the Poisons Board. 
I am here solely to explain the practical effect of the new con- 
trol upon the business of those that you represent. If you 
require to know the reasons underlying the Act, I would refer 
you to the debates in Parliament, whilst it was there under 
consideration or, in the case of the Rules recommended by the 
Board, to the Report by the Board to the Home Secretary^ — 
which has also been published. 

Under the existing law relating to poisons, the substances of 
which the retail sale is restricted fall into three categories : — 

(1) Those of which the retail sale is restricted to phannacists ; 

(2) Those that can be sold by anyone, subject to certain 
requirements as to labelling ; and 

(3) Preparations containing arsenic and the alkaloids of 
tobacco used in agriculture and horticulture which may be sold 
by pharmacists and also by persons licensed by the local 
authority for the purpose. 

By the Act of 1933, Parliament decreed that the second and 
third categories should be abolished and replaced by a class of 
substances, the retail sale of which should be restricted to 
pharmacists and persons registered with the local authority. 
After May i the local authority cannot refuse to register anyone, 
that is to say, cannot refuse an application to enter anyone's 
name in a list entitling him to sell poisons in Part II of the 
Poisons List, i.e., the substances in the new category, unless 
he has failed to pay the prescribed fees or he is, in the opinion 
•of the local authority, for any sufficient reason relating either 
to him personally or to his premises, not fit to be registered. 
Any person whose application to be registered is refused, has 
the right of appeal to the Court of Quarter Sessions. 

The Changes Principally Affecting Grocers 

The changes principally affecting grocers and provision mer- 
chants relate to those substances in the second category I men- 
tioned just now — namely, those which were hitherto permitted 
to be sold by anyone subject to certain requirements as to 
labelling ; so I will deal with those first. They are those to 
which Section 5 of the Poisons and Pliarmacy Act of 1908 
applies — solution of ammonia containing more than 5 per cent, 
of ammonia (cloudy ammonia); hydrochloric acid (spirits of 
salt); soluble salts of oxalic acid (salts of lemon); sulphuric acid 
(vitriol); nitric acid, and carbolic disinfectants containing not 
more than 3 per cent, of phenols. The effect of the Poisons 
Board's proposals is that persons registered with the local 
authority shall be permitted to sell sulphuric acid, solutions of 
ammonia and the carbolic disinfectants, but not nitric acid, 
hydrochloric acid or the soluble salts of oxalic acid. The range 
of disinfectants permitted to be sold by persons other than 
pharmacists is extended from a 3 per cent, phenol content to 
a 60 per cent, phenol content. You will recollect that one of 
the declared aims of this legislation was to permit traders other 
than pharmacists to retail effective disinfectants and to remove 
the encouragement which existing legislation gives to the sale of 



ineffective disinfectants containing not more than 3 per cent, of 
phenols. There is one important exception to this extension 
to the 60 per cent, limit. The Board has proposed that the 
sale of lysol and dilutions of lysol should be reserved to pharma- 
cists. I think your Federation has made representations to the 
Home Secretary on that point. I should point out a slight 
difference in the treatment given to solutions of ammonia. Pre- 
viously, the solutions falling under control were those contain- 
ing more than 5 per cent, by weight of free ammonia: after 
May I solutions containing 5 per cent, or more of free ammonia 
fall under restriction. 

The remaining substances in Part II of the Poisons List con- 
sist of 

(a) those substances which have hitherto not been con- 
trolled at all — namely, potassium hydroxide (caustic potash) 
and sodium hydroxide (caustic soda), hydrofluoric acid, 
potassium fluoride, sodium fluoride, sodium silicofluoride, 
formaldehyde and nitrobenzene ; and 

(b) those substances, the retail sale of which has hitherto 
been restricted to pharmacists or, in the case of agriculture, 
etc., preparations of arsenic and tobacco also to persons 
licensed by the local authority. 

Now as regards registration. It is hoped that it will be found 
possible to arrange matters so that the local authorities will be 
in a position to open their lists early next year. A trader who 
wishes to be registered should, after the Poisons List and Rules 
have been made final, apply to his local authority for a form 
of application (the actual form appears as the Seventh Schedule 
to the Draft Rules), and pay to the local authority a fee yet to 
be fixed. The Home Secretary has given notice of intention to 
fix an initial fee of 7s. 6d., an annual renewal fee of 5s., and a 
fee of IS. for any alteration of the particulars in the registration. 
These fees, I understand, are also the subject of representations 
by your Federation. It is very important that a trader who 
wishes to sell any poison in Part II of the List shall become 
entered on the local authority's list before May i, in order 
that he may be within the law in selling the poison after that 
date. There have been certain changes in regard to the local 
authorities whose business it is to administer the law. Pre- 
viously, the local authorities issuing licences for the sale of 
agricultural and horticultural preparations containing arsenic 
and the alkaloids of tobacco were the Council of any municipal 
borough in England having a population of more than 10,000 ; 
and in Scotland the Town Council of any Royal Parliamentary 
or Police Burgh ; and, as respects any other place, the County 
Council. Under the new law, the local authorities concerned 
will be : In London, the Common Council of the City of London 
and the Councils of the Metropolitan Boroughs ; elsewhere in 
England they will be the Councils of the County Boroughs and 
the County Councils ; in Scotland, the Town Councils of large 
burghs (within the meaning of the Local Government (Scotland) 
Act, 1929); and elsewhere, the County Councils. 

The Poisons Rules 
The Poisons Rules lay down certain requirements in regard 
to the sale of poisons which must be observed by any trader who 
sells poisons by virtue of being registered with the local autho- 
rity. These requirements can be briefly summarised: — 

The substance must be labelled conspicuously both on the 
inner container and on the outer cover (except where the 
outer cover is a transparent wrapper) : 

(a) with the name of the poison ; 

(b) in the case of a preparation which contains a poison 
as one of the ingredients thereof, with the proportion which 
the poison content in the preparation bears to the total 
ingredients ; 

(c) with the word " Poison," except in the case of 
articles containing potassium hydroxide or sodium 
hydroxide (caustic potash or caustic soda) which will be 
labelled " Caution. This substance is caustic." 

(d) with the name of the seller of the poison and the 
address of the premises upon which it is sold. 

The word ' ' Poison ' ' or the cautionary notice in the case of 
caustic potash and caustic soda, must be either on a separate 



428 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



October 5, 1935 



label or surrounded by a line within which there should 
be no other words except those required by the Act and Rules 
to be put on the label. In the case of the arsenical and 
mercurial substances and barium carbonate, the word " Poi- 
son " must be either in red lettering or set against a red 
background. Except in the case of antiseptics or disinfectants 
and similar articles for external application to the body, if 
the substance is a liquid and contained in a bottle of not more 
than I20 fluid ounces it is to be labelled " Not to be taken." 
If it is for external application, it is to be labelled " Not to 
be taken internally." If the substance is a liquid contained 
in a glass bottle of not more than 120 fluid ounces, the outside 
of the bottle is required to be fluted vertically with ribs or 
grooves recognisable by touch. 

1 should here, perhaps, explain that the Rules relating to 
labelling and containers apply equally to wholesalers and manu- 
facturers as they do to retailers, so that, therefore, if the manu- 
facturers and wholesalers comply with the law the substances 
will come to the retail trader, except as regards his own name 
and address, in a condition in which they can legally be retailed. 
(The speaker went on to deal with special restrictions for 
various substances, and with storage rules.) 

Nothing I have said must be taken as an inclusive statement 
or an authoritative interpretation of the law. The description 
I have given has been necessarily condensed, and it may be 
that it can be shown to be inaccurate when applied to particular 
cases for which the Act or Rules have made special provision. 
There are, for instance, groups of substances and types of 
transactions which are exempted from the provisions of the Act 
and Rules. For these I must refer you to the Rules themselves. 
In this connection, I may say that the Home Office fully appre- 
ciates that the Poisons Rules are intricate and are not easily 
comprehended at first reading. In view of the technical char- 
acter of the subject-matter, this cannot be otherwise. The 
department, therefore, proposes to issue, as soon as practicable 
after the Rules are made final, a memorandum for the guidance 
of the traders affected. With this and the assistance which 
your Federation has offered to the Home Secretary, it is hoped 
that the necessary changes inay be effected with as little dis- 
location and disturbance as possible. 

Before closing, I should perhaps mention a point on which 
your members are likely to be interested, that is to say, 
inspection. The enforcement of the law as it lelates to the sale 
of the substances in Part II of the list lies with the local authori- 
ties, who will employ inspectors to visit the shops of registered 
retailers. The enforcement of the law relating to the sale of 
poisons in Part I of the list, i.e., those of which the retail sale 
is restricted to pharmacists, lies with the Pharmaceutical 
Society, who will employ inspectors for the purpose. The 
Society's inspectors will have the right of entry to any premises 
in which they have reasonable grounds to think that the law is 
being broken ; for instance, the premises of any trader whom 
they believe to be selling poisons, the sale of which is restricted 
to pharmacists. Under the existing law, in cases in which a 
breach of the law was disclosed, the Society could only proceed 
by way of civil action for the recovery of a fixed penalty of 
In future, proceedings will be in a court of summary jurisdic- 
tion, and the amount of the fine, if inflicted, will be at the 
discretion of the magistrate, up to a maximum of ^25. 

Discussion 

Mr. Kent, commenting on the address, said that although 
he had a great deal to do with the matter, and was responsible 
for the drafting of the somewhat lengthy memorandums that 
the Federation had submitted from time to time, first to the 
Poisons Board and finally, last July, to the Home Office, he 
had learned a good deal from the able way in which Mr. 
Perrins had brought together the points of something that was 
extremely intricate. It was a revolution, and although he was 
not making any criticism or claiming any credit for the Fede- 
ration, he thought it might fairly be said that, taking the large 
view, the position of grocers in respect to poisons generally 
would be very much betfer after May i, and clearer than it had 
ever been before. That in itself was a very great advantage. 
The second point was that on and after May i they would be, 
as grocers or as listed sellers of poisons under Part II of the 
list, no longer subject to the inspectorate and the administra- 
tion of a penalty by the Pharmaceutical Society, against which 
the Federation made representations at the Departmental Com- 
mission's inquiry in the time of the late secretary, but, instead. 



they would be under the administrative control of the local 
authority. He suggested that that in itself was a very great 
gam, because in tfteir judgment it was never the right thing 
that any trade should have control over the grocery trade. In 
that respect their position was improved, and if they would 
only look at this piece of legislation as an expression of Parlia- 
ment's desire to clarify the position in regard to the sale of 
poisons, and if they would look at it from the point of view of 
the wide public interests that were involved in the sale of 
poisons, he thought they would agree that even with registra- 
tion and having to have regard for the new Rules, the grocery 
trade would be better rather than worse off. They should get 
from their suppher a guarantee that the goods he supplied 
conformed to the law. He was not going to suggest that that 
would be a sufficient defence if there were proceedings, but it 
was a good safeguard, and he thought it would be found on 
the whole that manufacturers and wholesalers of poisons under 
Part II of the List that could only be sold by listed sellers 
would send out these things properly labelled and packed, and 
that the grocer would have no real trouble in that respect. 

Mr. C. H. Collins said that up to the present time oil and 
colourmen had largely sold poisons in bulk, and he would like to 
know how they would fare with bulk sales under the new Rules. 
Would they still be allowed to sell a zinc worker a gallon, say, 
of spirit of salt under any of these labels Then there was the 
question of disinfectants. In the part of London he came from, 
and he daresay it was the same in many other parts of the 
country, disinfectants were largely sold by street hawkers. 

Mr. Perrins said that as regarded spirit of salt the Poisons 
Board had recommended to the Home Secretary that the sale 
of that substance was to be restricted to pharmacists only. In 
regard to the question of hawkers selhng poisons as disinfectants 
Parliament had decided that matter. No one might sell those 
substances unless he was registered by the local authority to 
sell from his registered premises, so that when the law came 
into force there would be no hawking of carbolic disinfectants 
as there was at present. 

Replying to other questions Mr. Perrins said that the pro- 
vision regarding the appointment of deputies who would be 
nominated to the local authority for the purpose of sale of 
poisons meant that two deputies would be allowed for each 
registered premises. On the point of inspection, it would be 
perfectly open for the Pharmaceutical Society to employ an 
agent who could walk into a shop and purchase a poison which 
was prohibited if he thought it was being wrongly sold. 

Mr. Kent said that in regard to the question of deputies, the 
Federation in their memorandum had submitted that the 
naming of deputies and the limitation to two deputies were 
unnecessary. They suggested that the matter might be better 
and more conveniently dealt with by a Rule requiring that the 
sale of such substances must be by the listed seller and (or) by 
a member of his staff above the age of twenty-one years. It 
appeared to him that the suggestion they made was a practical 
one which would really mean that the law would be more 
strictly observed than it might be under the Home Office 
proposals. 

Mr. H. J. Dryer asked what would be the position of a 
man, who had not hitherto carried on that particular line of 
business, who bought a business from a trader who was 
licensed. 

Mr. Perrins replied that if a man bought a business under 
those conditions it would be necessary for him to go to the 
local authorities and re-register. 

Mr. Kent said Mr. Cobbin had asked him to inquire whether 
if the name and address of a listed seller were impressed on the 
goods by means of a rubber stamp it would meet the require- 
ment that the name and address of the seller should be upon 
the label. 

Mr. Perrins replied that he thought it would be quite suffi- 
cient, but in the interests of traders he thought it would be 
better for them to have an artistic label. 

Mr. Kent said another difficulty that arose was in regard to 
the smaller retailer, to whom the cost of additional labels would 
be something of a hardship. 

Replying to a further question, Mr. Perrins said that the 
mobile shop would not be able to sell poisons, unless it was 
the deliver^' van of a registered seller. 

A cordial vote of thanks was accorded to Mr. Perrins. 

A SOURCE OF information. — A recent issue of the " National 
Druggist,'-' St. Louis, Montana, U.S.A., incorporates six 
articles from the C. &■ D., with the usual acknowledgment. 



October 5, 1935 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 429 



Diet and Climate 

Abstract of two Cantor Lectures delivered before the Royal Society of Arts, and published in the 
issues of the Society's Journal for September 13 and September 20 



IT is a general principle in life that the importance of valu- 
able and essential things is often not realised until they 
are damaged or removed, and this principle is nowhere 
better illustrated than in the twin sciences of pathology and 
physiology. Over and over again has the study of a patho- 
logical or disordered state disclosed unsuspected truths concern- 
ing the working of the organism when in normal health. And 
so has it been with the function of light in nutrition. After 
a long controversy that at times degenerated into polemic, it 
became slowly realised that the common disease of rickets was 
due to a disordered state of nutrition. This fact, combined 
with the discovery that the disease could be cured or prevented 
by sunshine, or by certain forms of artificial radiation, at once 
proved the importance of sunlight in nutrition. 

One of the first important clues as to the cause of rickets 
was found in the study of its seasonal incidence and geographi- 
cal distribution. In 1890 Dr. Theodore Palm put forward the 
theory that rickets is a disease of sunless places. On the basis 
of his own experience in Japan, as well as that of other doctors 
practising in the tropics where rickets was rare although diets 
were poor, he concluded that sunshine was the great agent for 
prevention and cure of rickets. Rickets, he showed, was above 
all a disease of the industrial centres of Northern Europe, where 
sunlight, never too plentiful, was often obscured by a pall of 
smoke from factory chimneys and domestic fires. Palm's theory 
is akin to the well-known " Domestication Theory " of Hanse- 
mann (1906), based on the common occurrence of rickets among 
wild animals bred in captivity. Hansemann believed, however, 
that rickets was due rather to lack of exercise than lack of 
sunlight, both being usual features of the confinement. 

Palm's conclusions were confirmed by those of Raczynski 
(1912), who found a connection between the degree of sunshine 
and the seasonal incidence of rickets in children, and called 
attention to the great increase in the disease in the spring after 
the dark winter season, and to the diminution in summer and 
autumn, corresponding to the period of greatest illumination. 
Observations on this subject have been greatly extended in 
recent years by Hess and his co-workers in the United States 
(1921). Raczynski's conclusion that the seasonal incidence of 
rickets reflected the seasonal incidence of light was based on 
an important experiment which showed the effect of sunshine 
in controlling the retention of calcium and phosphate in the 
animal body. In 1919-20 Huldschinsky in Berlin, whose work 
was carefully controlled with A--ray photography, showed that 
active rickets in children could be cured by exposure to the 
ultra-violet radiations from a mercury vapour quartz lamp. 

Professor Mellanby's Research 

The final proof of the dietetic nature of the disease was given 
by E. Mellanby (1918-21), who showed that rickets in puppies 
could be developed or prevented at will by a simple modifica- 
tion in the diet, and that the nature of the fat given was the 
determining factor. Rickets was developed if, to the basal diet 
of separated milk, cereals, lean meat with orange juice and 
yeast, lard or certain vegetable oils (e.g., olive oil, linseed oil) 
were added ; rickets was prevented or cured if these fats were 
replaced by cod-liver oil, egg yolk or (to a less extent) by butter 
fat. Mellanby interpreted these results as proof of the presence 
in the last three fats of an unknown essential dietary factor, 
whose function was to secure the retention by the organism of 
lime salts and phosphates, for the building of normal bones. We 
have here the discovery of what afterwards was named the 
Antirachitic Vitamin D. These two lines of research, showing 
the effect in prevention of rickets (a) of light, and (b) of certain 
fats in diet, were beautifully harmonised by a series of crucial 
experiments carried out in the United States. 

The conclusion that cod-liver oil in the diet or exposure to 
certain radiations had the same physiological action received 
immediate direct confirmation in some clinical studies on rickets 
carried out by a group of English workers in Vienna, after the 
Great War, in the years from 1919-22. Careful observations 
durmg the period of worst deprivation showed that all these 
diseases affecting bone nutrition were most widespread and 
severe in winter and spring, and that remission occurred in 



summer and autumn. Cod-liver oil, without any other treat- 
ment or change in diet, proved a specific preventive and cure 
for rickets in children, and for osteomalacia in old people, even 
in winter. No cures occurred when the babies remained in the 
wards without change of diet, whatever the season, thus prov- 
ing that the curative rays in sunshine are those ultra-violet 
radiations which are unable to penetrate window-glass. 

Put very briefly, the antirachitic vitamin D contained in the 
active fats was found to be associated with a waxy substance, 
ergosterol, present in very small amounts in the unsaponifiable 
fraction. Ergosterol is nutritionally inactive and may be called 
pro-vitamin D, but when exposed to ultra-violet radiation it is 
changed to an active isomeric form, of similar composition, 
which has this powerful effect on mineral metabolism. The 
pure crystalline material "calciferol," isolated by Askew, 
Bourdillon, and their co-workers (1931, 1932) at the National 
Institute of Medical Research, is so potent that the daily dose 
found curative for rickets in children is contained in about a 
milligram. Ergosterol is present in very small amounts in skin 
fat and becomes activated when the sun's rays fall upon it, 
vitamin D is created and this can be absorbed through the skin 
as readily as when taken with the food. This interrelation of 
sunshine and diet in the control of mineral metabolism is of 
more fundamental importance than is at first apparent. Cal- 
cium salts and phosphates are essential constituents of every 
cell in the body. 

Distribution of Vitamin D in Foodstuffs 

Vilamin D is not widely distributed in ordinary foods, and 
many foods which possess it in summer contain much less in 
winter, when our need is the greater. Thus, butter and milk 
fat provide appreciable amounts when cows are on pasture in 
summer, but may contain only traces in winter. Liver, egg- 
yolk, fat fish (e.g., herrings) are at all times valuable in this 
respect, and all growing children are the better for a small daily 
ration of cod-liver oil (or other fish liver oil), which is the 
richest known source of this essential vitamin. A small amount 
of vitamin D will act with better economy when lime salts and 
phosphates are well supplied in the diet. Hence the import- 
ance in diet of foods rich in these minerals, e.g., milk, green 
vegetables and potatoes, in preference to an e.xcess of meat or 
cereals. Provision of lime salts in the drinking water may also 
be more important for dwellers in industrial northern cities than 
for those in the tropics. It is a significant fact that the city 
of Glasgow, which in the past has been one of the great foci of 
rickets in children, should be supplied with an especially soft 
water derived from Loch Katrine. 

If sunshine were the only means of protection, it would follow 
that rickets would be unknown in the tropics, and, in Arctic 
regions during the long winter, would be universal. We shall 
see that both these suppositions are false. The races inhabit- 
ing Arctic regions are accustomed to a diet rich in fats and 
liver oils, i.e., in vitamin D, and it is probable that this cir- 
cumstance has made their survival possible. On the other 
hand, some groups of people inhabiting the tropics have social 
customs which hinder access to fresh air and sunshine for 
women and children, while the diet is poor in mineral salts and 
animal fats. Vitamin D can only control and correct the meta- 
bolism of lime salts and phosphates if these are present in 
adequate quantities in the diet ; sunshine can only provide 
vitamin D if the inhabitants take advantage of the supply thus 
provided. 

In India, and also in Northern China and Manchuria, the 
prevalence of osteomalacia and rickets is connected with the 
social customs of the people, combined with the poorness of 
the diet. In India poor diets could often be corrected by the 
abundant sunshine, and both rickets and osteomalacia are found 
chiefly among the races observing the custom of purdah, which 
keeps the women and children indoors, while the diet rich in 
cereals, poor in meat and genuine milk fat, and containing no 
liver oil, is not suited to a life without sunshine. Osteomalacia 
is endemic among the women of the purdah castes and is usually 
associated with pregnancy, which places a great strain upon the 
calcium metabolism of the mother. 

{To be continued.) 



430 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST October 5, 1935 

Salford Analyst's Report 



OF 1,347 samples dealt with by the Salford City Analyst, 
Mr. H. E. Monk, B.Sc, F.I.C., in his 1934 report, 
which has recently appeared, ninety-two were of drugs 
or pharmaceutical products. No percentage figures have been 
extracted in respect of this group, but of the total of samples 
of all classes, the percentagt of adulteration recorded is 3.3. 
Since the maximum recorded during the last ten years has been 
7.7 and the minimum 2.9, the figure may be taken to be satis- 
factorily low. In 1933 it amounted to 4.0 per cent, of samples 
taken. Three prosecutions were brought in respect of lysol 
samples, found 95 per cent., 94 per cent, and 95 per cent, 
deficient in lysol respectively. Extracts from the report, given 
below, are especially interesting for their pronouncements upon 
lysol soap standards : — 

Castor oil pills. — A formal and informal sample of the 
same brand of castor oil pills were adulterated. Their action 
was not due to castor oil. Owing to the extractive matters 
present for the drugs employed, it was not possible to be 
certain that there was absolutely no castor oil in the pills, but 
they certainly contained no more than two per cent., or one- 
tenth minim per pill. The medicinal dose of castor oil is 60 
to 480 minims. This fact 'shows how impossible it is to make 
any pill which in point of strict truth can be called a castor- 
oil pill, since to contain even a moderate dose of castor oil the 
pill would have to be the size of a large marble. The par- 
ticular pills approximated in composition to the compound 
rhubarb pill of the British Pharmacopoeia, and their purgative 
action wag due to aloes and rhubarb. After an interview with 
a director of the manufacturing firm, the label was altered to 
" Aperient Pills " — and, in smaller type — " a substitute for 
castor oil." The manufacturing pharmacist seems to think 
the general public sets great store by castor oil as a purgative. 

" Lysol " and " Lysol Solution " 

Lysol and lysol powder.— Five samples of lysol were sub- 
mitted during the year and four of these were adulterated. 
Tha four samples represented three difierent brands. The 
cartons and bottles of the three brands were all very similar 
and had obviously been copied, and " Doctors " whose names 
had been given to the first and third brands were purely imagin- 
ary gentlemen. Each bottle had only one direction for use — in 
identical wording — " For cleaning wounds and douches, one 
tablespoonful to a pint of water." The bottles themselves were 
of a kind suggesting the usual poison bottle. In 1932, for the 
first time, a standard for lysol appeared in the new edition of 
the British Pharmacopoeia. The new definition was " Liquor 
Cresolis Saponatus — synonym, Lysol— Solution of Cresol with 
soap is a solution of cresol in a saponaceous solvent. It 
contains 50 per cent, v/v of cresols. ..." If this standard 
is compared with the amounts of cresols in the samples as 
shown in the above table, it will be seen that these average 
about one part of lysol in twenty parts of water. The table 
also shows that the label and outer cartons refer to " Lysol 
solution " and contain statements as to cresol content. No 
doubt the makers thought that by this means they were 
covered in law at least. There is also no doubt at all that the 
purchaser of these articles was deceived. The " man in the 
street " (or his wife) may have heard of lysol and may know 
that it is a common, concentrated disinfectant, and even 
remember occasional poisoning cases from the drinking of 
lysol, but such subtleties as lysol solution and references to 
3 per cent, of cresols would convey absolutely nothing to him. 
These articles were having a large sale at markets, by hardware 
dealers, oil and colourmen, and by hawkers trading from door 
to door, and were generally referred to by those retailing them 
simply as " lysol "; in fact, this was what the inspector asked 
for in buying the samples. There is but little doubt, however, 
that, so far as the retailers were concerned, this was more a 
matter of ignorance than of wilful misrepresentation. Of 
course, had the cresol content been more than 3 per cent, these 
preparations would have been classed as poisons under 
Schedule 2 of the Poisons and Pharmacy Act and their sale 
restricted to registered chemists and druggists. Most of the 
cartons were marked with a price — 7jd. — though no one con- 
nected with their sale or preparation ever seriously asked or 
expected to get this price. The usual practice was to leave it 



to the retailer to get what he thought he could for them-, 
generally 2d. or 2 id. Another method was to charge 6d. for 
a bottle and to give one similar bottle "free." 

What Constitutes " Lysol Soap/' ? 

Lysol Soap.' — Following the above cases the attention of the 
department was drawn to a number of brands of lysol soap, 
and of the ten samples examined four were purchased as lysol 
soap. These were examined more especially for their lysol 
content and found to contain the equivalent of lysol 5.6 per 
cent., 0.5 per cent., 1.2 per cent, and 1.6 per cent, respectively. 

The question arises : what is the minimum percentage of lysol 
in a soap which justifies its being called " lysol soap "? An 
attempt was made to answer this. The usual dilution of lysol 
recommended for washing the hands is i per cent., and i per 
cent, solution is stated to have a disinfectant effect upon the 
skin. A lysol soap might reasonably be taken to be one which 
in use results in, at the very least, ^ per cent, solution being 
applied to the skin. To discover what is the usual strength of 
soap solution used in washing, say, the face and hands, the 
experimenter took some soap and proceeded as if to wash his 
face and hands. Instead of applying the lather to his face he 
transferred it to a weighed dish and the weighed amount was 
evaporated to dryness and total solid matter (soap) determined. 
The following amounts of soap were found : — 

Five seconds' lathering. Total solids 10.6 per cent., equiva- 
lent to 15 per cent. soap. 

Ten seconds' lathering. Total solids 16. i per cent., equiva- 
lent to 23 per cent. soap. 

The amount estimated was that in the hands and not that 
in the final washing water. On this basis it is arguable that 
a reasonably good lysol soap contains not less than 4 per cent, 
lysol and that 2 per cent, is a minimum standard below which 
the soap is not entitled to the name. 

It will be seen that only the first of the four samples satisfied 
even the minimum requirement. No action has been taken in 
respect of these samples since it has been difficult to discover 
a means whereby such a standard can be enforced. 

When " Iodine " is asked for 

Iodine.- — Seven samples of " iodine," four informal and three 
formal, were returned as adulterated. Prosecutions were insti- 
tuted in respect of three. 

The .samples, which should have contained 2.5 per cent, of 
iodine, 1.5 per cent, of potassium iodide and 93-5 per cent, 
alcohol (of 90 per cent, strength), actually contained, respec- 
tively : — • 



Iodine 


0 


7% 


0-7% 


0-2% 


Potassium iodide 


0 


7 


0-3 


None 


Water 


23 


9 


41-7 


i6-i 


Methylated spirit {90 v/v) 


72 




55-9 


8i-6 


Boric acid 


2 


5 


1-4 


1-5 



The bottles were labelled ' ' Solution of Iodine ' ' and directed 
that the contents were for external use only. They were obvi- 
ously intended to supply the demand for what the ordinary 
man calls "iodine," and a comparatively large trade has 
recently sprung up in these preparations, chiefly in the markets. 
While it cannot be said that they have no disinfecting value if 
applied to the skin, there is no reason why the well-recognised 
standard of the Pharmacopoeia (for liq. iodi mitis.) should 
not be maintained — except to save money for the maker's 
pocket. An interesting feature of each of these samples was 
that the bottles, all closely resembling each other and holding 
I oz., bore the price " is. 3d." The retail vendors asked 2d. 
to 6d. Each of the makers stated that his formula had been 
" approved by the Customs and Excise," yet the sole concern 
of the Commissioners is that the spirits shall be used in con- 
formity with the appropriate Regulations. 

Phenolated Iodine Solution. — The sample contained iodine 
0.05 per cent., potassium iodide 0.5 per cent, and phenols as 
cresylic acid 0.5 per cent. A reasonable standard would 
appear to be iodine 2.5 per cent., phenol 2 per cent. The 
makers gave an undertaking that they would not recommence 
its manufacture and would recall any unsold bottles on 
retailers' hands. 



October 5, 1935 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 431 



Trade Report 

Where possible scales of prices of chemicals are given for bull< down to small quantities. Prices recorded for crude drugs, 
essential and fixed oils and coal tar products are for fair sized wholesale quantities. Qualities of chemicals, drugs, essential 
and fixed oils, etc., vary, and selected brands or grades would be at higher values 



28 Essex Street, W.C.2, October 3 

The gradual development of the international political crisis is be- 
ginning to affect a number of markets and shipment business, except 
for immediate despatch, is already proving exceedingly difficult to 
negotiate. There is so far no general action on the part of con- 
sumers ; some are covering their requirements well ahead, while 
others prefer to hold off and await developments. The general tone 
in practically all spot markets drawing supplies from overseas is at 
the moment firmer on account of the uncertain conditions. Business 
in Pharmaceutical chemicals has been up to the recent improved 
level, and quoted values show but little change. Iodides, 
Bismuth salts and Mercurials are steady. We note it is be- 
coming a general practice to notify buyers of goods passing inwards 
and outwards that the war risks rate on marine insurance will be 
for their account. Makers notify that prices for Citric and Tartaric 
Acids are now at level figures, the former being advanced and the 
latter reduced. 

Crude Drugs 

A general business on a very fair scale is reported, and the tone in 
the majority of markets is very steady and tending firmer. Spot 
stocks of quite a few products are well below normal, and the 
prospect of further shipments is uncertain ; and, in any event, 
they are likely to cost more landed here. The demand for Agar con- 
tinues brisk and values, spot and forward, are again dearer and firm. 
In the Aloes market Curagao is very firm on spot, with nothing 
offered firm for shipment. Balsam Tolu shows a slight recovery. 
Cascara Sagrada for shipment has advanced again. Shipments 
of Norwegian Cod-liver Oil are showing a substantial decline 
so far this season. Colocynth is scarce on spot. Ergot 
is marking time. Shipment offers of Portuguese are a 
little freer, with prices fully maintained, but most buyers are not 
interested at these figures. The position of Gum Acacia is of interest ; 
supplies at the source are very limited, and values are firm, tending 
to advance, but here again buyers seem to be in no hurry to cover 
their requirements. As recently forecasted, the market for Matto 
Grosso Ipecacuanha is firmer ; spot supplies are now very low. 
Menthol continues to sell well and values are again slightly dearer. 
Mercury is firm and the demand is sustained. Peppers show a 
further slight recovery. Pimento is firm at better figures. There 
has been more interest in Bees' Wax, and Carnauba Wax shows a 
recovery after the recent decline, closing steady. 

Essential Oils 

Business has been rather restricted, but values are keeping quite 
steady. Bergamot is steadier for shipment, but business is lack- 
ing. Bois DE Rose is rather easier forward. Cinnamon Leaf is 
slightly dearer for shipment. Australian Eucalyptus is dearer at the 
source, and some spot holders' prices have been adjusted accord- 
ingly. Sicilian hand-pressed Lemon is steadier for shipment, but 
practically no business reported. Lemongrass tends to recover 
from the recent decline, Japanese Peppermint continues in good de- 
mand and closes firm, spot and forward. Business in Fixed Oils 
has been on a good scale, and most products have appreciated in 
value. Linseed is steady. Rape has advanced sharply and closes 
firm. Cotton and Coconut are fully steady at better figures. Palm 
has advanced again. Olive and Soya are firm and dearer. Hankow 
Wood has soared to famine prices. 

Exchange Rates on London 



The following is a list of the chief Continental and other exchange 
rates at the opening on Thursday morning: — 



Centre 


Quoted 


P 


ar 


October 3 


Value ef the £ 


Amsterdam 


Fl. to £ 


12 


107 


7-25 


12/0 


Berlin 


Mks. to £ 


20 




1219 


ii/ii.V 


Brussels 


Belgas to £ 


nominal 


29 02 J 


16/7 " 


Copenhagen 


Kr. to £ 


i8 


159 


22 • 40 


24/8 


Lisbon 


Esc. to £ 


no 




109I 


i9/iij 


Madrid 


Ptas. to £ 


25 


22J 


35t 


28/4 


Milan 


Lire to £ 


92 


46 


6oi 


12/ir; 


Montreal 


Dol. to £ 


4 


86? 


4-965 


20/4:}" 


New York ... 


Dol. to £ 


nominal 


4-goi 


20/1I 


Oslo 


Kr. to £ 


i8 


159 


19-901 


21/11 


Paris 


Fr. to £ 


124 


21 


74T5r 


12/0 


Prague 


Kr. to £ 


164 


25 


118.I 


12/0 


Stockholm ... 


Kr. to £ 


18 


159 
38 


19 -394 


21/4 


Warsaw 


Zloty to £ 


43 


26 


11/11} 


Zurich 


Fr. to £ 


25 


2115 


15-05 


11/11} 



Bank rate 2 per cent. 



Pharmaceutical Chemicals, etc. 

A steady business is reported in a number of lines and the general 
tone is quite steady. British makers' prices for some of the leading 
products are fully steady. Makers' prices for citric and tartaric 
acids have been adjusted to level figures. 

Amidopy'rin. — Rather more inquiry ; importers' prices maintained ; 
isolated cheaper lots: crystals, five cwt., i8s. oid.; two cwt., 
iSs. 5id.; less than two cwt., i8s. lojd. per lb., with powder 2id. 
per lb. extra. 

Aspirin (tablets). — The following are agreed wholesale prices of the 
British makers: Under 5,000, 3s. per 1,000 ; 5,000, 2S. iid.; 10,000, 
2s. lod.; 25,000, 2s. qd.; 50,000, 2s. 8d.; 75,000, 2s. yd.; 100,000, 
2s. 6d.; 250,000, 2s. 5d.; 500,000, 2S. 4d.; 1,000,000. 2S. 3d.; 2,000,000 
and over, 2S. 2d. per thousand tablets. A rebata of id. per 1,000 is 
allowed on orders for 10 million tablets taken over a period of 12 
months. For small quantities higher prices would be asked by whole- 
sale distributors. 

Barbitone. — A fair amount of small business, market steady : spot, 
one cwt., 15s. 3ld.; 56 lb., 15s. 8d.; smaller parcels, up to i6s. per lb. 

Benzonaphihol. — Spot supplies in small parcels are quoted at 
about 3s. 2d. to 3s. 3d. per lb. 

Benzoic acid (B.P.). — Fair business, market steady: quantities, 
ex works, is. gid.; spot parcels, is. lod. to 2s. 3d. per lb., ex store, 
as to quantity. 



Bismuth salts. — Makers' prices are as follows: — 





Net 
Monthly 
Account 


Net 14 days (a) 


Under 
8 lbs. 


8 lbs. and 
under 
28 lbs. 


28 lbs. and 
under 
I cwt. 


Not less 

than 
I cwt. (6) 




Per lb. 


Per lb. 


Per lb. 


Per lb. 




s. d. 


s. d. 


s. d. 


s. d. 


Carbonate 


8 0 


6 9 


6 3 


6 0 


Citrate ... 


II 3 


10 0 


9 6 


9 3 


Nitrate Cryst. ... 


6 3 


5 0 


4 6 


4 3 


Oxide ... 


12 0 


10 9 


10 3 


10 0 


Salicylate 


9 6 


8 3 


7 9 


7 6 


Subchloride 


II 10 


10 7 


10 I 


9 10 


Subgallate 


9 2 


7 II 


7 5 


7 2 


Subnitrate 


7 3 


6 0 


5 6 


5 3 



(a) If sold on monthly account, 3d. per lb. extra is to be charged. 

(b) Contracts are booked for i cwt. and upwards for delivery over 
3 months and are subject to a rise and fall clause. A rebate of 3d. 
per lb. is allowed on sales of not less than 2 cwt. salts (assorted if 
required), provided delivery is completed within three months. All 
deliveries ex contract are sold on net cash 14 days terms. 

Bromides. — Makers' and dealers' scales of prices unchanged, fair 
business: ammonium, not less than five cwt., is. gd.; one cwt., 
IS. lod.; small quantities, 2s. sd. per lb.; potassium, B.P., crystals 
and granular, not less than five cwt., is. 6d.; one cwt., is. yd.; 28 lb., 
IS. lod.; smaller quantities, 2s. 2d. per lb.; sodium, B.P., not less 
than five cwt., is. 8d.; one cwt., is. gd.; 28 lb., 2s.; smaller quanti- 
ties, 2S. 4d. per lb., net, without engagement. Special prices for 
larger quantities. 

Butyl chloral hydrate. — Remains dull: spot, 14 lb., 8s.; 7 lb., 
8s. 3d.; I lb., 8s. 6d. per lb., in i-lb. bottles. 

Caffeine. — Continental makers' agreed prices : pure alkaloid, two 
cwt., 7s. lod.; one cwt., 8s.; 56 lb., 8s. 2d.; smaller quantities, 8s. 4d. 
per lb., delivered, 5-lb. tins free, smaller packing extra. Citrate, two 
cwt., 5s. 5fd.; one cwt., 5s. 6jd.; 56 lb., 5s. 7t-d.; smaller quantities, 
5s. 8Jd. per lb., delivered. British material: pure, 56 lb., 8s. 4d.; 
less, 8s. 6d. per lb. Citrate, 56 lb., 5s. gd.; less, 6s. per lb. 

Calcium lactate. — Average inquiry, with quoted values steady: 
spot, one cwt., is. o|d.; 56 lb., is. i|d.; 28 lb., is. 2*d.; smaller 
quantities, up to is. 6d. per lb. 

Carbolic acid (B.P. crystals).— The scale of prices for deliveries 
to June 30, ig36, is as follows: Twenty tons, 7d.; ten tons, 7id.; 
one ton, 7id.; less than one ton, 7M. per lb., in drums, carriage 
paid. Wholesale distributors' prices for small parcels will be dearer. 

Chloral hydrate. — Makers' prices continue to control the home 
market: duty-paid crystals, in 14-lb. free containers, five cwt., 
3s. id.; one cwt., 3s. 2d.; 28 lb., 3s. 3d.; 14 lb., 3s. 4id. per lb.; 
28-lb. jars one penny per lb. extra. 



432 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



October 5, 1935 



Citric acid (B.P. crystals). — British material is now quoted at is. 
per lb., less 5 per cent, discount, nominal and without engagement. 
Dealers' prices for imported material are competitive. 

Cream of tartar. — Market is steady, business moderate : British 
material, 99 to 100 per cent., 79s. per cwt., less 2-J- per cent, discount. 
Dealers' prices for foreign material competitive. 

Creosote (B.P.). — Market remains dull: bulk quantities, in 25-kilo. 
demijohns, is. gid. to is. lod. per lb.; smaller parcels, is. loid. to 
2S. 3d. per lb., ex store. 

GuAiACOL (crystals). — Prices unchanged for Continental material: 
2S-lb, jars, los. oid.; 14-lb jars, los. 2id.; i-lb. bottles, los. SJd. 
per lb., ex store. Liquid: 28-lb. demijohns, gs. 6id.; 14-lb. demi- 
johns, gs. gid.; i-lb. bottles, los. o^d. per lb., ex warehouse. 

Hexamine. — Makers' prices for bulk quantities are competitive ; 
fair business: B.P. powder, from is. sid. to is. 4id.; free-running 
crystals, from is. yd. to is. 8id. per lb., carriage paid, for bulk lots. 
Dealers quoting free-running crystals, two cwt., is. 7|d.; one cwt., 
IS. Sd.; 14 lb., IS. lod.; smaller parcels, up to 2s. per lb., carriage 
paid. 

Iodides. — Kather more business with makers' scales of prices 
steady. Potassium Iodide, B.P., one cwt., 5s.; 28 lb., 5s. 2d.; 14 lb., 
5s. 4d.; 7 lb., 5s. 8d.; 4 lb., 6s. 2d.; smaller quantities, 6s. 8d. per 
lb., carriage paid. 

Lactic acid (B.P.). — Market is fairly steady but still on the quiet 
side: quantities in carboys, is. 4M. to is. sd.; in Winchesters and 
bottles, IS. 6d. to is. gd. per lb., as to quantity. 

Mercurials. — ivlakers' prices show no change and are fully steady. 
Chloride, B.P., one cwt., 4s. gd.; smaller quantities, from 4s. lod. 
per lb. 

Methyl salicylate. — Inquiry continues fairly good, with quoted 
values unchanged: spot, ten cwt., is. jd.; five cwt., is. sJd.; one 
cwt., IS. 6d.; less than one cwt., is. yd.; small quantities, in bottles, 
up to 2s. per lb. 

Methyl sulphonal. — ^\'alues are keeping steady and inquiry has 
been a little better: two cwt., 19s. gid.; one cwt., 19s. gid.; 56 lb., 
20s. zid.; small parcels, 20s. 8d. per lb. 

Paraformaldehyde. — Fair business, market competitive : 100 per 
cent, powder, quantities in kegs, is. ijd. to is. 2d.; smaller parcels, 
up to IS. 6d. per lb. 

Phenaceiin. — Market is duU and continues to be quoted at low 
values: crystals or powder, bulk quantities, 2S. yd. to 2s. 8Jd.; 
smaller parcels, 2S. gd. to 3s. per lb. 

Phenazone. — -Modest business is reported, with values about 
steady: crystals, five cwt., 8s. gfd.; two cwt., gs. o^d., and less, 
about gs. 3d. per lb., with powder 2id. per lb. extra. 

Photographic chemicals. — Amidol. — 28 lb., 7s. 6d.; 14 lb., 8s. 3d.; 
7 lb., gs,; under y lb., iis. gd. per lb., in i-lb. bottles. Chlorquinol. 
— i-lb. bottles, 21S. per lb. Glycin. — y lb., ids. 6d.; i-lb. bottles, 
13s. 6d. per lb. Hydroquinone. — 56 lb., 4s. loid.; 28 lb., 5s.; 14 lb., 
5s. 3d.; y lb., 5s. 6d.; i-lb. bottles, 6s. 6d. per lb. Metol. — 28 lb., 
gs. 6d.; 14 lb., gs. gd.; 7 lb., 10s. gd.; 3 lb., iis. 6d.; i-lb. bottles, 
I2S. 6d. per lb. Alum (photographic quality). — i cwt., 21s. per cwt.; 
28 lb. for 6s. Cold chloride. — 15-grain tubes, 51s. 6d. per 
doz. Magnesium powders. — los. per lb. Paramidophenol hydro- 
CHLOR. — 8s. 6d. per lb. Potassium ferficyanide. — 14 lb., 2s. 3d.; 
y lb., 2S. 6d.; i lb., 2s. gd. per lb. Potassium metabisulphite. — 
I cwt., 7id.; 28 lb., 8d.; 14 lb., gd.; y lb., iid.; i lb., is. per lb. 
Pyrogallic acid. — 28 lb., 6s. gd.; 14 lb., ys. 6d.; y lb., 8s. 3d.; under 
y lb., 8s. gd. per lb. Sodium carbonate (recryst). — 5 cwt., 12s. 6d. 
per cwt.; i cwt., 15s. 6d. per cwt.; 56 lb. for iis. 6d.; 28 lb. for 6s. 
Sodium hyposulphite, cube, cryst. — 5 cwt., i6s. 3d.; i cwt., i8s. 6d. 
per cwt.; 50 lb. for iis. 6d.; 28 lb. for 6s. Sodium sulphide (pure). — 
7 lb., is. 3d.; I lb., IS. 6d. per lb. 

Quinine salts. — Convention scales of prices continue steady ; 
business about normal: sulphate, 2s. id.; bisulphate, 2s. id.; ethyl 
carbonate, 2S. 8|d.; salicylate, 2s. gid.; hydrochlor., 2s. yjd.; bi- 
hydrochloride, 2s. lofd.; hydrobromide, 2s. yld.; bihydrobromide, 
2s. loid.; valerianate, 3s. yd.; hypophosphite, 3s. lojd.; alkaloid, 
2S. iid. per oz., carriage paid on bullc quantities ; loo-oz. tins free ; 
smaller packing extra. 

Salicylic acid (B.P.). — B'air business, with makers' prices steady: 
five cwt.. IS. yd.; one cwt., is. y^d.; 28 lb., is. 8d.; 14 lb., is. gd.; 
y lb., IS. iid.; 4 lb., 2s. per lb. 

Salol. — Occasional small inquiry, market steady : spot, crystals, 
two cwt., 3s. 6d.; one cwt., 3s. 6^(1.; 50 lb., 3s. yid.; smaller parcels, 
up to 4s. per lb.; powder 2d. per lb. extra. 

Santonin. — Not less than 50 kilos., £^5 12s. 6d.; not less than 25 
kilos., £^6 IS.; less than 10 kilos., £'36 gs.; not less than 3 kilos., 
£36 17s.; not less than i kilo., £jb 13s. 6d.; less than i kilo., 
£39 13s. 6d. Special prices are in operation for export to all markets. 

Sodium benzoate (B.P.). — Business on moderate scale at competi- 
tive prices: one^cwt., is. 7d.; smaller parcels, is. 8d. to is. lod. per 
lb., as to quantity. 

Sodium salicylate (B.P.). — Makers' and dealers' prices are un- 
changed: home trade, crystals or powder, five cwt., is. 8id. ; one 



cwt., IS. gd.; 28 lb., 2s.; 14 lb., 2s. 2d.; 7 lb., 2s. 3d.; i lb., 
2s. 6d. per lb. 

Sulphonal. — Market receiving fair inquiry : crystals or powder, 
two cwt., 15s. 5ld.; one cwt., 15s. lojd.; 56 lb., i6s. id.; smaller 
parcels, up to i6s. yJd. per lb. 

Tartaric acid (B.P. crystals). — British makers have reduced their 
quoted price to is. per lb., less 5 per cent, discount. The quotation is 
now level with that for citric acid. Dealers offering foreign material 
at competitive prices. 

Theobromine. — Continental material: pure, two cwt., ys. lod.; one 
cwt., 8s.; 56 lb., 8s. 2d.; smaller quantities, 8s. 4d. per lb. Sodium 
salicylate, two cwt., 6s. 34d.; one cwt., 6s. 42d.; 56 lb., 6s. sid.; 
smaller quantities, 6s. 6id. per lb., delivered, 5-lb. tins free, smaller 
packages exlxa. 

Thymol. — Moderate small parcel business, market steady : syn- 
thetic, fine white, one cwt., 5s. gd.; 56 lb., 5s. iiid.; 28 lb., 6s. j^d.; 
14 lb., ys. per lb.; ex ajowan seed, one cwt., 8s. 3d.; 56 lb., 8s. 6d.; 
28 lb., gs.; 14 lb., los. per lb. 

Vanillin. — Business fair, with Convention prices quite steady : ex- 
clove oil or guaiacol, five cwt., 13s. 3d.; one cwt., 13s. 6d.; 56 lb., 
133. gd.; less, 14s. per lb. 

Crude Drugs, etc. 

Aconite root.- — Dealers report some small business: Napellus, 65s.; 
Japanese, 45s. per cwt. 

Agar. — The demand continues good and parcels near afloat are 
quickly taken up at full prices. The shipment market is firm at the 
further advance with Yokohama No. i very sparingly offered : spot, 
Kobe No. I, 3s. 4-4d. to 3s. 6d.; No. 2, 35. 2d. to 3s. 3d.; Yokohama, 
No. I, 3s. 2d. per lb.; shipment, Kobe No. i, 2S. ii^d.; No. 2, 2s. gd.; 
Yokohama No. 1, 2S. 84d. per lb., c.i.f. New crop, February-March 
shipment: Kobe No. i, 2S. 3d.; No. 2, 2S. 2d.; Yokohama No. i, 
2S. lid. per lb., c.i.f. 

Aloes. — Curasao for shipment is nominal with a figure of about 
loos., c.i.f., suggested ; bids at substantially lower figures have been 
ignored. Cape is steady and a few small sales are reported at former 
figures: Cape, spot, 50s. for prime in boxes ; shipment, boxes, 45s.; 
cases, 50s. per cwt., c.i.f. Curasao, spot, lOos. to 105s.; shipment, 
nominal per cwt., c.i.f.; no firm offers. 

Antimony. — Values are maintained at last week's advance : Chinese 
crude, ^,'33, c.i.f.; English regulus, £/5 to £76, spot. 

Balsams. — Rather more inquiry. Tulu is steadier on spot at 
IS. 6d.; Canada, 2S. lod.; Peru. 5s. 3d. per lb., spot, for small 
parcels. 

Barbasco root. — This product has again received very little in- 
quiry, spot or forward. 

Belladonna. — Occasional small business on spot: leaves, 65s.; 
root, 3ys. 6d. per cwt., spot. 

Benzoin. — Some fair business is reported, with good medium at 
£(> and fair medium at £5 per cwt. 

Buchu. — Business has been restricted to odd bales, but values 
are keeping very steady, with rounds from is. 3d. to is. 4d., as to 
quality. Ovals, if available, would be from is. to is. id. per lb. 

Burdock root. — Average spot business in small quantities, with 
dealers quoting about 45s. per cwt. 

Camphor. — Spot and forward prices for Japanese are steady at 
last week's advance: on spot, tablets, 2s. gd.; powder, 2s. 2d.; slabs, 
2S. i-|d. per lb.; shipment, tablets, 2S. ijd.; powder, is. loid.; slabs, 
IS. loid. per lb., c.i.f. English refined is still unchanged: flowers, 
one cwt., 3S. id.; 28 lb., 3s. 2d.; small lots, 3s. 3d. per lb. Trans- 
parent tablets, 4 oz., 8 oz., and 16 oz., 3s. 4d.; i oz. and 2 oz., 3s. sd.; 
i oz., i oz. and \ oz., 3s. 6d. per lb.; special prices for contracts for 
quantities. 

Canthariues. — A little better inquiry, market tends to be steadier : 
Russian, about 6s. gd.; Chinese, dearer at 2s. 6d. and upwards per lb., 
as to quantity, spot. 

Cascara sagrada. — The shipment market shows a further advance 
with limited offerings up to 39s. per cwt., c.i.f., for car-load lots: on 
spot, 1934, peel is now close up to 42s.; 1933 peel, 4ys. 6d., and 
1932 peel, about s^s. 6d. per cwt. 

Chamomiles. — Inquiry continues on a fair scale, with prices for 
new crop flowers ranging from 120s. to 140s. per cwt., as to quality. 
Some off-colour yellowish at cheaper figures. 

Cloves.— Spot is cheaper and quiet: forward quotations sHghtly 
easier ; Zanzibar, spot, yid.; shipment, October-November, 6-Jd. per 
lb., c.i.f. Madagascar, in bond, 6d.; shipment, October, sJd.; new 
crop, November-December, sid- per lb., c.i.f. 

The landings of Zanzibar in London during the week ended September 28 were 204, 
and the deliveries 105, leaving a stock of 2,978. From January i to date the landings 
of Zanzibar have been 2,950 and the deliveries 3,066. Landings of Madagascar 
for the week ended September 28 were 231, and the deliveries 46, leaving a stock 
1,435. From January i to date landings of Madagascar have bean 3,232 and 
deliveries 2,031 packages. 

CocoA butter. — .Average business: prime English, gd. to gid. per 
lb. Foreign, 8id. to gd. per lb., as to quantity. 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



433 



Coconut (desiccated). — Rather quiet with values about main- 
tained: spot, fine, 23s.; medium, 23s. per cwt.; shipments, halves, 
October, 21s. Od. per cwt., c.i.f. 

Cod-liver oil. — Bergen reports the shipment market steady. Ex- 
ports to September 15 last totalled 58,390 barrels, compared with 
66,983 barrels at the same date in 1934 and 66,308 barrels in 1933. 
Finest Lofoten steam refined non-freezing medicinal oil, 91s. per 
barrel, c.i.f., London: spot, in small lots, 132s. 6d. per barrel, ex 
store, duty paid. Newfoundland, non-freezing medicinal oil, 130s. per 
barrel, ex store. British non-freezing medicinal oil is now quoted 
at iios. to II2S. 6d. per barrel, c.i.f., London, duty free, while quota- 
tions from another home source are at higher figures. 

CoLCHicuM. — Dealers are offering root on spot at about 40s. per 
cwt. Seed, from iid. to is. per lb., market slow. 

CoLocYNTH. — Supplies on spot are reported short: pulp, 2s. 2d. 
per lb. 

Derris root. — Inquiry for spot or shipment remains very slow ; 
values nominally unchanged. 

Ergot. — The spot market is limited to a few bags of Russian at 
about 3s. per lb. with occasional inquiry. The shipment market is 
a point dearer on the week, with Portuguese quoted at 3s. lo^d. 
to 4s. per lb., c.i.f. Buyers are showing very little interest in these 
figures. 

Gentian. — A moderate demand, market steady; French, 36s.; 
Italian, about 34s. per cwt., for small parcels. 

Ginger. — Market is quoted dearer and closes firm : West African, 
spot, 36s.; shipment, October-December, 34s.; new crop, February- 
iV'Iarch, 31s. 6d. per cwt., c.i.f. Jamaican, spot, bold, in barrels, 94s. to 
iocs.; small grinding, about 70s. per cwt., in bags, ex store. 

Gum acacia. — Values are level on the week and firm, but buyers 
are holding off. It is reported that the stocks at the source, including 
250/270 tons of old crop of doubtful quality, are estimated not to 
exceed 625 tons in all ; this comparatively small quantity is all that 
will be available up to the end of November. Shippers are restrict- 
ing their offers to immediate shipment on account of the political 
situation: spot, Kordofan cleaned sorts, firm at 50s.; bleached 
No. I, firm at 90s.; extra firm at loos. per cwt.; shipment, Kordofan 
cleaned sorts, 47s. 6d. per cwt., c.i.f. 

Henbane. — New crop is available on spot at about 80s. per cwt. 
for small parcels. 

Henna, — Occasional small spot business: Indian, 32s. 6d.; 
Egyptian, 32s. 6d. per cwt. 

Honey. — Business on a fair scale, and the market is tending 
firmer: Jamaican, dark manufacturing, 32s. up to 48s. per cwt. for 
pale. Mexican, amber, 37s. 6d. per cwt., duty paid. 

Hydrastis. — Business is still on the small side. Spot, 8s.; ship- 
ment firm at 7s. gd. per lb., c.i.f. 

Ipecacuanha. — Our recent reports indicating coming firmer condi- 
tions have proved correct. Sales of B.P. Matto Grosso have been 
good on spot and stocks of this qualitv are now exceedingly small ; 
shipment is firm and tending dearer : Matto Grosso, B.P. test, fully 
5s. 3d. per cwt.; shipment, 4s. 7|d. per lb., c.i.f.; Minas, 4s. 4id. 
to 4S. 6d. per cwt., as to quantity, spot. 

Liquorice root. — Rather more inquiry. Natural root, 12s. per 
cwt. Decorticated, 35s. to 48s. per cwt., as to grade. 

Lycopodium. — Dealers' quotations for limited supplies range from 
4s. to 4s. 3d. per kilo. 

Manna. — Selected flake in i-lb. tins on spot are offering at about 
4s. 3d. per lb. 

Menthol. — The demand has again been good and supplies offering 
are getting very limited. Spot business in K/S brands is reported 
from 13s. yjd. up to 13s. gd.; in bond, 12s. 3d.; shipment, October, 
I2s. 3d.; October-December, 12s. i^d. per lb., c.i.f., at which prices 
buyers are reported. Japanese shippers' quotations are firm ; 
October-November, 12s. lo^d.; October-December, 12s. gd. per lb., 
c.i.f. 

Mercury. — The Spanish-Italian group report business continues 
brisk for most destinations, market firm at 57 dollars per bottle, f.o.b.. 
Continent ; spot, in small lots, £11 12s. to £jj 15s. per bottle, ex 
store. 

Opium. — There is a fair demand on spot for small parcels and 
values are very steady: spot, is. 5d. to is. sJd. per unit, landed and 
duty paid. 

Pepper. — At the further slight recovery in values the market is 
steady: Lampong, in bond, 3id.; shipment, November-December, 
2f6d.; January-March, 3d., c.i.f. Tellicherry, spot, 5d.; shipment, 
October-November, 43s., c.i.f. Aleppy, spot, 4Jd.; shipment, October- 
November, 41S. 6d. per cwt., c.i.f. White Muntok, in bond, 5d.; 
shipment, November-December, sJd. per lb., c.i.f. 

Pimento. — Values have again advanced and the market closes 
firm; spot, 4d. per lb.; shipment, October-November, 34s. 6d. per 
cwt., c.i.f. 

Psyllium seed. — Some cleaned French seed is available at about 
gd. per lb., spot, in small parcels. 



Rubber.— Values are barely maintained on the week, and the 
market has been mostly quiet: standard ribbed smoked sheet, spot, 
5-fid.; October sikd.; November, 5j|d.; December, 5f|d.; January- 
March, 5id; April-June, 6d.; July-September, 6Jd. per lb. 

QuiLLAiA BARK. — Spot parcels are available round about 30s., with 
shipment at 24s. per cwt., c.i.f. 

Rhubarb. — Rather quiet business but spot values are very steady : 
Shensi, medium round, 3s. gd. to 4s. Canton, 2s. 3d. Rough round, 
IS. 3d. to IS. 4d, per lb., as to quality. 

Saffron.— Rather more inquiry, dealers' spot values steady: spot, 
1898, prime, 38s. 6d.; extra, 36s. 6d.; super, 35s. 6d. per lb., and less 
for bulk quantities. 

Sarsaparilla. — Market is dull, quoted unchanged : spot, Jamaican 
grey, is. 4d. to is. 5d.; native, mixed colours, lo^d. to iid. per lb., as 
to quantity, spot. 

Seeds.— ANisE.- Spot, duty paid, Bulgarian, 3^8.; Spanish, 68s. 
Canary. — Market dearer, Mazagan sold at 28s., landed, duty paid. 
Caraway.— Dutch spot, 34s., duty paid, and 28s. 6d. f.o.b., Holland. 
Coriander. — Market remains firm: Morocco sold at iSs., duty paid ; 
new crop, for shipment, quoted at i6s., c.i.f. (not offered firm). 
Wormy, spot, 16s., duty paid. Cumin. — Malta, spot, has been cleared 
at 45s.; Morocco, spot, 48s. 6d., duty paid ; 43s. 6d. in bond. Fenu- 
greek.— Morocco, spot, sold at 14s., duty paid ; 12s. 6d., c.i.f., quoted 
for prompt shipment. Mustard. — English, 22s. to 32s. 6d. per cwt., 
according to quality. Dill. — Indian, 11 per cent., spot., i6s. to 
i6s. 6d. Fennell. — Indian, spot, 30s.; no business passing. 

Senega. — Business has been of small account: spot and forward 
quotations are level at about is. 4d. to is. 4id. per lb. 

Senna. — Little imijrovcment in demand can be reported, but the 
general tone continues quite steady and the political situation in 
adjoining territory to the Sudan is likely to have a stiffening effect 
on the market. Spot holders' prices are well maintained at the 
figures given in last week's report, and sales are not being pressed. 

Shellac— Values are quoted slightly dearer on the week : spot, 
standard TN orange, 53s. 6d. to 57s. 6d.; fine orange, 85s. to 140s.; 
pure button, 82s. 6d. to 90s. per cwt., spot. For delivery, TN, 
October, 53s. 6d.; December, 54s. 6d. For arrival, TN, October- 
November, 58s. 6d. per cwt., c.i.f. 

Squill. — ^A few parcels on spot are held for about 27s. 6d. per cwt. 
Inquiry is small. 

ToNQUiN beans. — A few small sales reported, with Para fair frosted 
beans at 2S. lojd. to 3s. per lb. 

Tragacanth. — Business has been routine, with most inquiry for the 
medium white grades, which are firm at £iS to ^^22 per cwt., on a 
short supply. Textile grades have been quieter ; quoted from 70s. 
to S8s. per cwt. 

Valerian root. — A limited inquin,- on spot, with holders asking 
about 70s. per cwt. for small parcels. 

Wa.x. — Bees' : Inquiry has been better and values are slightly 
higher for shipments. Abyssinian, spot, 107s. 6d.; shipment, gys. 5d., 
c.i.f. Benguella, spot, iios.; shipment, 97s. 6d., c.i.f. Conakry, 
spot, IIOS.; shipment, loos., c.i.f. Dar-es-Salaam, spot, 107s. 6d.; 
shipment, 105s., c.i.f. Carnauba. — Market is fully steady and values 
have recovered with new crop dearer. Chalky grey, spot, 172s. 6d. 
shipment, old crop, October-November, 167s. 6s., c.i.f. Fatty grey, 
spot is scarce: old crop, 175s. Primeira, yellow is short on spot 
and quoted at 225s.; afloat is scarce at 220s. Mediana, spot, 210s. per 
cwt. New crop shipment prices are as follows : fatty grey, October- 
December, 157s. Od.; November-December, 152s. 6d.; January- 
February, 150s. Chalky grey, December-January, 147s. 6d. Primeira, 
December-January, 190s. Mediana, December-January, i8os. per cwt., 
c.i.f. 

Essential Oils, etc. 

A fair miscellaneous business is reported with values keeping gener- 
ally steady. Bergamot is steadier forward but dull. Bois de Rose 
tends easier forward. Cinnamon leaf is firmer for shipment. Austra- 
lian eucalyptus is dearer forward. Sicilian hand-pressed lemon is 
steadier for shipment but slack. Japanese peppermint is firm and 
in good demand. 

Almond.- -Average spot demand for small parcels: English-made, 
cwt. lots, 2s. 6d.; smaller parcels, up to 2s. 8d. per lb.; foreign, cwt. 
lots, 2S. 4d.; smaller parcels, up to 2s. 7d. per lb. French, bitter, 
Ss. gd. per lb. 

Anise (st\r). — A little more spot inquiry ; shipment is unchanged 
and rather quiet: spot, leads, 2S. i-Jd.; tins, is. iijd. to 2s.; drums, 
IS. iid. per lb. ex store; shipment, leads, is. rod.; tins, is. 72d.; 
drums, is. 7d. per lb., c.i.f. 

Bay. — Market has remained quiet: 49 to 50 per cent., 5s. iJd. to 
5s. 4W. per lb., as to quantity. 

Bergamot. — The slightly easier offers in the shipment market re- 
ported last week have been withdrawn, and quotations are now 
steady at about 6s. per lb., c.i.f.; there is, however, very little in- 
quiry or business. The uncertain conditions for shipment are un- 
doubtedly hindering business. A modest business continues on spot, 
with prices varying from 5s. lod. to 6s- 4ld. per lb., as to quantity 
and ciuality. 



434 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



Ortober 5, 1935 



Bois DE KosE. — A few sales are reported on spot at about 5s. gd. 
for Brazilian. The shipment market remains slack and there is a 
tendency for prices to become a little cheaper. 

Cajufut. — The usual small spot business at former rates: B.P., 
IS. loid. to 2S. id. per lb., as to quantity. 

Cananga. — There has been very little inquiry for spot, with a 
few lots offering up to 13s. 4id. per lb.; shipment quotations con- 
tinue at IDS. iM. per lb., c.i.f. 

Caraway. — Dealers are doing average business, market steady : 
Dutch rectified, 9s. 6d.; crude, 9s. per lb., landed and duty paid. 

Cassia. — Spot offers of limited quantity are holding at 4s. 6d. per 
lb.; shipment, 3s. lod., c.i.f. There is very little inquiry on the 
market. 

Cedarwood. — Rather more inquiry being received with values 
steadily maintained : American and jVfrican quoted at about is. lid. 
to IS. 2d. per lb. in drums, and smaller packings up to is. 4ld. per 
lb., spot. 

Cinnamon leaf. — The recent firmer shipment conditions are fully 
maintained, and this week some offers of Ceylon oil have touched 
2S. 4d. per lb., c.i.f. Spot holders' price for drums, 2S. 6d. and smaller 
packings up to 2s. gd. per lb. 

Citronella. — Conditions in these markets remain unsatisfactory, 
with values stiU at a low level. Inquiry for shipment is unimpor- 
tant: Ceylon, spot, drums, is.; smaller parcels, is. ijd. to is. 4d.; 
shipment, drums, barely lod. per lb., c.i.f.; Java, spot, drums, 
IS. ijd. to IS. 2d.; smaller parcels, up to is. 4d.; shipment, drums, 
IS. oid. to IS. oid. per lb., c.i.f. 

Clove. — Business has been moving fairly well, values steady : 
Madagascar, spot, drums, 3s. 2d.; smaller packings, up to 3s. 6d. per 
lb.; shipment, 2S. yd. per lb., c.i.f. 

Eucalyptus. — Advices from the source this week indicate that 
shipment prices have advanced about id. per lb.; orders at former 
prices having been rejected. The general position is reported to be 
firm: Australian, 70 to 75 per cent., iiid. to is.; 80 to 85 per 
cent., IS. old. to is. id. per lb., landed ; higher prices for small 
lots on spot ; Spanish, 70 to 75 per cent., is. 2d. per lb., ex store. 

Geranium. — Except for occasional spot business, there seems to be 
little interest in this market: Bourbon, spot, 19s. to 22s. 6d.; ship- 
ment, 20s. 6d., c.i.f.; Algerian, spot, 21s. to 23s.; shipment, 19s. 6d. 
per lb., c.i.f.; spot values vary as to quality. 

Gingergrass. — The market is dull and rather easy: spot, 5s. 4id. 
to 5s. 6d.; shipment, 4s. 4|d. per lb., c.i.f. 

Ho (sHiu). — A fair amount of spot business is reported, with prices 
from IS. Szd. to 2S. id. per lb., as to quantity and quality; shipment 
offers are fully maintained and support spot values. 

Juniper berry. — A little better inquiry with dealers quoting stan- 
dard quality at about 3s. 3d., with the finest oil up to 4s. 6d. per lb. 

Lavender. — One or two shippers are reported to have eased their 
quotations slightly, possibly due to lack of good inquiry. This ten- 
dency to rather easier conditions was of a temporary nature and 
offers from reliable sources are now firm and well up to recent 
figures. Business, however, has not been of much account. Genuine 
Mt. Bianc, 38 to 40 per cent., 27s. 6d. per lb., landed. Other oils 
of good standard quality range from 33s. 6d. for 50 to 52 per cent, 
esters down to 19s. 6d. for 30 to 32 per cent. Lavandin is also very 
firm, with first quality from i6s. to iSs. and second quality from 
14s. 5d. to 15s. 9d. per lb. 

Lemon. — There is a steadier tone reported in the shipment market, 
the isolated cheaper offers of last week being withdrawn. Quota- 
tions now range about 6s. per lb., c.i.f., as to brand and quantity, but 
there is little actual business being done, owing to the difficulty and 
uncertainty of shipment. Business on spot has been modest, with 
holders' prices about 5s. gd. to 6s. 3d. per lb. Californian has not 
received much attention on spot: large drums, 3s. oid.; small drums, 
3s. id. per lb. 

Lemongrass. — The shipment market shows a slight recovery, and 
there has been more inquiry: quoted at the moment at is. iid. per 
lb., c.i.f., tending to go dearer. 

Neroli. — Market remains dull with dealers quoting new crop from 
13s. 6d. to 18s. 9d. per pz., as to quality, landed and duty paid. 

Nutmeg. — Continues steady with average spot business: English 
and American oil, 5s. id. to 5s. 4id. per lb., as to quantity. 

Orange. — There has been a limited sale on spot of French Guinea 
oil with the price for drums about 3s. and smaller packings up to 
3s. 4id. per lb. Sicilian sweet, spot, value nominal from los. 6d. 
per lb. Californian steady: spot, one case, 2s. 6id.; two or more 
cases, 2S. 4d.; drums, 2s. 3d. per lb. 

Palmarosa. — Business seems to have been very slow in this pro- 
duct for some time ; market rather unsteady: spot, 6s. 4d.; ship- 
ment, about 5s. 9d. per lb., c.i.f. 

Patchouli.— Reports from the source indicate that shipment values 
for first quality Singapore oil are now up to iis. 3d., c.i.f. Seychelles 
for shipment continues to be quoted at about 6s. 6d. to 6s. 7id. per 
lb., c.i.f. 

Peppermint. — The demand for home and export, after slackening 
for a day or two, shows a definite revival and at the close the market 



was firm with spot and afloat in very short supply: spot, 5s. 4id. 
to 5s. 6d.; afloat, 5s. 3d.; October-December, 5s. id. per lb., c.i.f., 
sellers. Japanese shippers' quotations are firm: October-November, 
5S. 4id.; October-December, 5s. 4id. per lb., c.i.f. American 
Peppermint : There has again been a fair amount of business in the 
shipment market, and, following the recent weakness, the source 
reports a firmer tone with offers from 2 dollars to 2 dollars 15 cents 
per lb., c.i.f., for natural oil, in drums. Some oil of low menthol 
content is offering at cheaper prices. 

Petitgrain. — This market has been dull: spot, 4s. to 4s. 2d.; ship- 
ment, about 3s. 6d. per lb., c.i.f. 

Rosemary. — Fair inquiry continues and values are holding steady : 
Spanish, first quality, about 2s. 3d.; second quality, about is. gd. 
per lb., as to quantity. French, 3s. 4d. per lb. 

Sandalwood. — Genuine East Indian Mysore, 19s. per lb., in one- 
case lots, on spot ; market is rather unsteady, with cheaper offers in 
some quarters, particularly for good quantities. English-made East 
Indian, 22s. 6d. to 25s. per lb., as to quantity. English-made West 
Indian, cwt. lots, 6s. gd.; 56 lb., 6s. lo^d.; 14 lb., 7s. per lb. Aus- 
tralian, case lots, 15s. 3d. per lb. 

Sassafras.— Business has been unimportant : spot, natural oil, 
4s. to 4s. 3d. Artificial oil at cheaper prices. 

Spearmint.- — Market is unchanged on the week, business poor: 
spot, Ss. 3d. to 8s. 4d.; shipment, 7s. 6d. per lb., c.i.f. 

Spike. — A fair inquiry continues in the shipment market for new 
crop Spanish with the price steady at about 4s. 6d. to 4s. y^d. per 
lb., landed, for fair quantities. 

Wintergreen. — Market is dull : spot, about 6s. per lb. for small 
parcels. 

Wormseed. — The American market is reported to be slightly 
firmer: spot, 8s. gd.; shipment, 8s. 3d. per lb., c.i.f. 

The following are current prices for synthetics, etc. — Aceto- 
PHENONE, 6s. to 6s. 4d. per lb.; amyl acetate, pure, 122s. 6d. per cwt.; 
technical, 107s. 6d.; amyl salicylate, 2s. 2d. per lb. for cwt. lots up 
to 2S. 6d.; AUBEPiNE, ex para creosole, 8s. to 8s. 6d. per lb.; benz- 

ALDEHYDE, f.f.C, 2S. 2d. tO 2S. 4d. per lb.; benzyl ACETATE, IS. Sad. tO 

IS. 8d. per lb.; benzyl alcohol, cwt. lots, is. iid. up to 2S. 3d. per 
lb. for small lots ; bromstyrol, 100 per cent., gs. 6d. to iis. per lb.; 
BUTYRIC ACID, 3s. 3d. to 3s. 6d. per lb.; citral, chemically pure, 
steady at 7s. gd. to 8s. 3d. per lb.; coumarin, 7s. 3d. to 8s. per lb.; 
ethyl phthalate is steady at is. 4d. to is. gd. per lb.; eugenol, 
7s. 6d. to 8s. per lb.; geraniol, ex palmarosa, 15s. to 17s. per lb.; 
HELiOTROPiNE, 100 per Cent, crystals, 6s. gd. per lb., as to quantity ; 
ISO EUGENOL, gs. 6d. to los. per lb. Methyl anihranilate, 6s. 6d. to 
6s. gd. per lb. Mirbane is quoted at yd. to 8d. per lb.; musk, 
ketone, igs.; ambrette, i8s.; xylol, 4s. 6d. per lb.; terpineol, is. 4d. 
for ton lots up to is. gd. per lb. for small parcels. 

Fixed Oils, etc. 

Rather more business has been done in some products, with values 
on a higher level. Palm oils are dearer and firm. Linseed oil 
is a strong market. Hankow wood oil has soared right up on a world 
shortage. Cotton, groundnut and soya are very steady markets. 
American turpentine is easier on the week, closing dull and rather 
unsteady. Acid oils. — Market dull and slightly easier: coconut 
and/ or palm kernel, nominal ; groundnut, 19s.; soya, 17s. loid., spot. 
Castor, — Quoted values are dearer and the market is very 
steady: pharmaceutical, 44s. 6d.; first pressings, 39s. 6d.; second 
pressings, 36s. 6d. (barrels) ; cases, £4 per ton extra, ex miUs, HuU, 
in not less than one-ton lots ; Bombay, 29s. gd. (drums), c.i.f. Coco- 
nut. — Market has been better and prices have advanced : deodorised, 
30s. 3d. (barrels), spot ; Ceylon mill, 20s. 3d. (drums), c.i.f. Cotton.— 
Values are fully maintained on a firm market ; business very fair: 
deodorised, 33s. 3d.; common edible, 31s. 3d.; soapmaking, 28s.; 
crude, 27s. Od. (barrels), spot. Groundnut.— Market continues firm ; 
business fairly good: deodorised, 41s. 6d. (barrels), spot; crude 
Oriental, 2gs. 4-2-d. (drums), c.i.f. Linseed (raw, naked). — Values 
show a sharp advance, market closing steady : spot, 28s. 6d. for small 
quantities ; October, 26s.; November-December, 26s. 6d.; January- 
April, 26s. gd.; May-August, 27s. 3d. per cwt. Boiled Oil, spot, 
30s. 6d. for small quantities. Olive.— Market is firm ; business on 
a fair scale: edible, in tins in cases, 72s. 6d. to 74s. per case of ten 
gallons ; in drums, B.P., 5s. 3d. to 5s. 4*d. per gallon, in 40-gallon 
barrels. Palm.— At the further advance the market is firm and busi- 
ness has been well sustained: Lagos, igs. 4id., shipment; softs, 
19s. lid., shipment ; mediums, 19s. 3d., shipment ; hards, 20s., ship- 
ment '; bleached, 22s. 6d., spot. Palm kernel.— Market is steady but 
rather quiet ; deodorised, 2gs. gd.; crude, 23s., spot, (barrels). Rape.— 
Values have advanced sharply ; firm: refined, 38s.; crude, 36s. 6d. 
(barrels), spot. Resin.— Values are a shade better ; market steadier: 
B, IIS. 7W.; D, IIS. loid.; F/G, 12s. 4id.; N. 13s. 3d.; W/G. 
14s. lid.; W/W, 14s. gd. per cwt., ex wharf. Soya.— Market is fully 
steady and business fairly good: deodorised, 31s. 3d.; crude, 29s. 3d. 
(barrels), spot. Turpentine (American).— Values have declined 
sharply and the market is much quieter. Total London stocks, 7,334 
barrels. On spot, 47s. 3d. Wood.— Prices have soared right up with 
a world shortage. Current quotations for October are now up to 
about 150S. to 160s. per cwt., for Hankow, in barrels, delivered. 



October 5, 1935 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 435 

Correspondence 

Letters should be written on one side of the paper only. Correspondents nnay adopt an 
assunDed name, but must in all cases furnish their real name and address to the Editor 



Chamomile Flowers 

Sir, — One of your correspondents in a recent issue of the 
C. &• D. was anxious to ascertain if the above flower was used 
otherwise than as a hair bleaching wash, or if used much at all. 
Yes, it is bought and used here extensively by my German 
clients, under the title " Cammilla Tee." They use it for 
fomentations and drink it as tea for all and sundry ailments, 
and as an eye lotion. I purchase 14 lb. at a time. . . . We 
have to have a working knowledge of German, Africaans 
(Dutch), together with English. — Yours faithfully, 

J. B. Faichney. 

Walvis Bay, S.W.A. 

Winter Tales 

Sir, — There will be many pharmacists who will join you in your 
plea for "open" meetings (C (&■ D., September 28, p. 395). 
We have suffered far too much in the past from speakers who, 
with a mysterious air of giving secret and exclusive informa- 
tion, commence their remarks by saying "as there are no 
reporters present," "speaking within these four walls," or 
" talking to you as brother pharmacists and quite unofficially." 
The efiect of such oratory can usually be gathered from the 
conversation of the dispersing members in the corridor, where 
one hears scraps of sentences concluding with ' ' all bunkum 
or "eyewash." During the progress of the Pharmacy and 
Poisons Bill through Parliament there might have been some 
excuse for secrecy on the ground that a premature disclosure 
of facts might have prejudiced negotiations ; but now that the 
Act is part of the law there can be no reason for obscure 
diplomacy any longer, especially as most pharmacists consider 
that its provisions will prove anything but beneficial to their 
status. Your suggestion that a meeting should be held at 
Bloomsbury Square with one of the officials of the Society to 
answer questions on the Pharmacy and Poisons Act is a good 
one. But if such a meeting should be held, I hope that the 
members of the Society who attend it will go prepared to put 
serious questions relating to vital contingencies. I have in mind 
some experiences of branch meetings which have been held 
under various titles such as ' ' questions night " or " grouse 
evening," when some leading man has come along to answer 
queries, and the members did not seem to know what questions 
to ask, or if they did ask any they referred to quite insignificant 
details. — Yours, etc., 

Querist (30/9). 

A Scarcity of Apprentices 

Sir, — The figures given at Leeds regarding the number of 
apprentices in the area and the dates of their entries (C. &■ D., 
September 28, p. 385) show a remarkable position. Taking an 
average of the last three years, thirty-four apprentices should 
be the annual entry ; this year the number so far has suddenly 
dropped to three, which represents not a mere decline but 
almost a stoppage. The usual term of apprenticeship being 
three years, this means that the effect will be apparent in 1938, 
when the apprentices enrolled this year finish their term. The 
next point to be ascertained is whether this decline is only in 
the Leeds area, or whether there has been a corresponding drop 
in the number of entries for the whole country. To find the 
direct cause of such an unexpected drop it would be necessary 
to know whether there had been inquiries from parents who 
decided not to place their children in pharmacy after learning 
the conditions, or whether pharmacists are reconsidering the 
advisability of employing more apprentices in view of the many 
new regulations they are to be burdened with. If this decline 
is general, it will solve the problem of saturation and will 
render any such devices as limitation of apprentices unneces- 
sary. — Faithfully yours. 

Declination (30/9). 

Multiplicity of Stock 

Sir, — In writing on " Multiplicity of Stock " (C. iS' D.. 
September 7, p. 312), " Manufacturer " says that the number 
of items from one fiim alone may run to nearly 100. Besides 



this multiplication of stock there is another difficulty the 
chemist has to face, the difference between the shades put 
out hy the various makers. For example, the " natural " 
shade of face powder or compact issued by one firm is a 
different colour from that packed by another, and the chemist 
often has the trouble of trying to explain this to a customer, 
who expects a ' ' natural ' ' shade to be the same in every 
make. The photographic manufacturers competed with one 
another in bringing out cameras and films differing in size by 
fractions of an inch, thus multiplying the chemist's stock by 
many odd sizes, but the demand has now come down in prac- 
tice to the three principal sizes, 16, 20 and 27. Will not the 
stocks of face powders and compacts in their turn become 
standardised to a few recognised shades, if only through the 
sheer impossibility of stocking them all? It sounds very easy 
to say that dated goods should be inspected at regular intervals ; 
but there are so many jobs to be done during the day and so 
many interruptions that in practice dates are sometimes 
apt to be overlooked, with subsequent loss, and in some in- 
stances where there is a slow demand, as with certain foods, 
the tins have to be returned carriage paid. The fickleness of 
mothers and doctors is not confined to infants' foods ; time 
after time the chemist is asked to stock a certain line, either 
by a customer who states that he is going to take it regularly, 
or by a doctor who wishes to prescribe it, then after one or two 
sales it is suddenly dropped or the demand changes to some- 
thing else. Such a request to stock a certain line generally 
applies to a high-priced item which is not usually kept, so that 
the one left over when the change is made constitutes a dead 
loss on the whole transaction. But the most annoying incident 
is when a mother asks for advice regarding the baby's feeding, 
a food is recommended and a tin sold ; on the next appearance 
of the customer inquiry is made respecting the infant's progress 
to be met by the reply that Mrs. So-and-so has told her that 
she can get food from the clinic " at half the chemist's price, 
my dear." One cannot compete against this. 

Yours faithfully, 

Stockit (25/9). 



Dispensing Notes 

Camphor and Menthol 

Sir, — In what proportions can menthol and camphor be 
mixed to liquefy completely and remain liquid for incorporation 
evenly with a powder? We find that equal portions rubbed in 
a mortar do not completely liquefy. Heated on a water bath, 
they liquefy but a crystalline deposit is formed on cooling. 
Do these two combine, or is the change purely physical? 

Yours faithfully. 

Menthol (24/9). 

[The following were mixed together, and the corked bottles 
stood in hot water for a time, shaking occasionally. The 
menthol was powdered first and the quantities weighed into 
the bottles. The camphor in flowers was then added, and the 
bottles corked. On the following day, when cold, and after 
standing, the results were : • — 
(i) Camphor... ... ... ... 2o\Small crystals were at the 



Menthol ., 

(2) Camphor.. 
Menthol .. 

(3) Camphor.. 
Menthol .. 

(4) Camphor.. 
Menthol .. 



20 J bottom — undissolved. 

20\ 
24/ 

20 \ Considerable 
16/ crystals. 
i6\ 



Completely clear solution. 

deposit of 



20/ 



A slight deposit only. 



There must therefore be an excess of menthol to make a 
clear solution. This may differ with varying samples of 
camphor, but we do not think it should with natural 
camphor and menthol. The artificial or synthetic varieties of 
each are largely sold. No. 2 appears to be in the right pro- 
portion. We believe that the liquefaction is a simple physical 
change without true chemical combination.] 



C C 



436 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST October 5. 1935 



Miscellaneous Inquiries 



When samples are sent particulars should be supplied to us as to their origin, what they are used for and how. 
We do not undertake to analyse and report upon proprietary articles nor to publish supposed formulas for them. 







With 


Without 






Rebate 


Rebate 


I 


5 


I -o 


1 -0 






I -0 


I '0 






I -o 


I -0 


aa. 15 


0 


I -0 


I -o 


... 15 


0 


2 -o 


2 -o 


ad 150 


0 


4Q-0 


105-0 






8-0 


8-0 






2 -0 


2 -0 






65 -o 


121 -o 



Erica (18/98). — Prescription charge. — The question of 
rebate is one which is decided by the local Excise officer. In 
certain districts rebate has been claimed on such a prescrip- 
tion and allowed, but there is no definite ruling. According 
to the C &■ D. costing system the charge for the prescription 
is as follows : — 



Hydrarg. sulph. rub. 
Sulph. ppt.. 
Zinc, oxid.. 
Talc. Venet. ... 
Glycerin. 
Sp. rectif. 

Oncost 

Container 



Charge 5s. 5d. Charge los. 

G. G. (25/99). — Pink disease — There is no specific treat- 
ment for pink disease and symptoms should be dealt with as 
they arise: good nursing is essential. For the ulcers in the 
mouth, a mixture containing potassium chlorate i gr., given 
four times a day, is useful, and the mouth should be swabbed 
out with glycerin and borax. For the restlessness and insomnia, 
a mixture of chloral 3 gr., potassium bromide 6 gr. , with 
syrup and chloroform water to 2 drachms, may be given twice 
in the twenty-four hours to a child one year old. Feeding is 
difficult owing to the marked anorexia. A well-balanced diet, 
however, should be given containing an abundance of 
vitamins in the form of fresh fruit juice and one of the cod- 
liver oil preparations. The diet should be that suitable for the 
child's age. As a tonic, a mixture containing liquor arsenicalis 
h min., tinct. nucis vom. 2 min., syrup q.s., aqua aurantii to 
I drachm, mav he given three times daily to a child of one 
year. 

A. L. (25/98). — Nicotine stains. — A mixture of equal parts 
o; solution of ammonia and solution of hydrogen j>eroxide may 
bo used to remove nicotine stains from the fingers if the stains 
are of recent origin. Another and effective method consists in 
the application of a 25 per cent, solution of sodium sulphite 
acidified by the addition of a small amount of dilute hydro- 
chloric acid. In the case of old stains the following treatment 
if recommended : The stain is moistened with a 5 per cent, 
solution of potassium permanganate ; when dry the part is 
moistened with a 5 per cent, solution of sodium thiosulphate 
and the latter is allowed to dry. Finally, dilute hydrochloric 
acid is applied my means of a pledget of cotton-wool. 

C. D. D. (3/94). — Nail varnish. — The modern types of nail 
varnish are prepared in the following manner : — 

Cellulose nitrate... ... ... ... loo-o 

Ethyl acetate ... ... ... ... 200-0 

Amyl acetate ... ... ... ... 200-0 

Butyl alcohol ... ... ... ... 15-0 

Butyl glycol ... ... ... ... 10 -o 

Dibutyl phthalate ' ... ... ... 15-0 

Ester gum ... ... ... ... lo-o 

Toluene ... ... ... ... ... 10 -o 

A range of fifty colours is now obtainable specially prepared 
fof lacquers ; the following are examples of the popular 
shades, other intermediate shades can be blended at will: — 
Natural: (clear) carmoisine (i-ioo) 2 to 4 parts, (fluorescent) 
safranine (i-ioo) 2 to 4 parts. Cellulose lacquer dyes need 
to be dissolved in the solvent before adding the nitrate. Rose : 
cellulose red 2.0; Coral: cellulose red i.o, cellulose orange 
i.o ; Ruby : cellulose red 10. o ; Tango: cellulose red i.o, cellu- 
lose orange 2.0. Pearl effects are obtained by the addition of 
fish scale essence 15 c.c. The synthetic product is not recom- 
mended for the silver finish, as it produces a grey shade in the 
bottle when the slight separation takes place. Silver : Colour- 
less varnish plus 15 c.c. pearl. Golden : Gold cellulose colour 
2.0 plug 15 c.c. pearl. For colourless, omit the ester gum and 
toluene. 



C. R. C. (25/99). — Vomiting in pregnancy. — There is no 
specific treatment for vomiting in pregnancy, but the following 
have been used with success : — 

(1) Bismuth, carb. ... ... ... ... gr. xv. 

Acid, hydrocj'an. dil. ... ... ... iT|,iij. 

Tr. card co. ... ... ... ... 3j- 

Aq. chlorof. ... ad §ss. 

(2) Adrenaline (i in 1,000)'... ... ... lT\xv. 

Ac. sulph. dU. ... ... ... ... n\iss. 

Aq. chloroformi . . . ... ... ad §j. 

(3) Sodii bromidi ... ... ... ... 3i]- 

Aqua' anisi ... ... ... ... 3iij- 

Syrupi glycyrrhiza: ... ... ad §iij. 

Two to four teaspoonfuls or more in water as required. 

(4) Extracti hyoscyami ... ... ... gr. j. 

Cerii oxalatis ... ... ... ... gr. iv. 

One powder two or three times daily. 

As regards diet, in ordinary cases milk food should be given 
for the first twenty-four hours, together with glucose saline 
every four. On the second day, toast and steamed fish is 
advisable. On the third day, ordinary diet should be pre- 
scribed. Carbohydrates are essential, but fats should be 
avoided. When feeding bv mouth is possible, solid food is 
preferable to liquid diet. 

]. E. H. (21/88). — Lawn sand. — A preparation made 
according to the following formula should be mixed with an 
equal part of rotted leaf mould or good soil and applied at 
the rate of 8 oz. per square yard three or four times a year: — 
Ammonium sulphate ... ... ... 3 parts 

Calcined iron sulphate ... ... ... i part 

Sand 20 parts 

H. &• K. (19/99). — Blue rinse. — A blue rinse for white hair 
is generally either methyl blue or the laundry blue (" blue 
bag "). If the former is employed, a few drops of a i in 200 
solution is sufficient. The laundry blue should be suspended in 
a weak mucilage of tragacanth and sufficient used to tint the 
rinsing water. A more elaborate preparation than the above 
could be made with the following solution: — 

Gentian blue i gr. 

Methyl blue h gr. 

Boric acid 3° gi'- 

Water 20 oz. 

R. .4. J. (25/99). — The book dealing with recent advances 
in medicine which seems to meet your requirements is Camp- 
hell's " Handbook of Therapeutics " (Livingstone, 12s. 6d.). 



Retrospect of Fifty Years Ago 

Reprinted from 
"The Chemist and Druggist," October 15. 1885 

The Major Examination 

Copies of Dr. Greenhow's reports on the examinations for 
1883 and 1884 were forwarded from the Privy Council o£&ce 
[and presented at the Council meeting of the Pharmaceutical 
Society] .... He had formerly hoped that the Major examina- 
tion of the Pharmaceutical Society might have been so gradu- 
ally raised in character that the certificate of pharmaceutical 
chemist would have afforded a sufficient guarantee that its 
possessor was fully qualified to make both qualitative and quan- 
titative chemical analyses, and, therefore, to hold such appoint- 
ments as those of public analyst, etc. Such a development of 
this qualification of the Pharmaceutical Society would have 
tended to raise the scientific status of pharmacists in the right 
direction, and have met a public want. There is, however, 
no present prospect of the scientific attainments of the ordinary 
pharmaceutical chemist being raised much above the present 
standard, and, meanwhile, another society has been founded 
for the purpose of holding high-class examinations and granting 
certificates of competency in scientific and practical chemistry. 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



1 



IMPORTANT 



ANNOUNCEMENT 




The new attractive and improved pack of Normo-Gastrine to be sold at 2/- per box 
comprises 5 cellophane tubes of 10 tablets each. 

A National Advertising Campaign including the "Daily Mail," "Daily Express," "News 
Chronicle," and "Daily Mirror" is to commence this month, and in addition Normo- 
Gastrine advertisements will appear in all the principal buses. 

The advertising will link up with the interests of the Chemist and you are cordially 
invited to co-operate by returning to us immediately any of the original pacl<. which you 
may have on hand to enable us to replace it by the new pack at the earliest possible date. 

Write for particulars of Special Bonus offer to — 

BURG O Y N E: 
URBIDCES £ CO. LTD. 

LONDON E 

^^HH^^^^MM^^H 'ManuFae rarer? of Pharmaeeufiea/P pi nee 1 7-4/ ^^hmmmmhi^^hh 



ii 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



October 5, 1935 




the . 



in 



Ctrl' 

pi 



lis 



Reliable products of 

DEPENDABLE QUALITY 

at the RIGHT PRICE 

® ® ® 

HALIBUT LIVER OIL 

in convenient and tasteless form 

TABLETS 

each containing li minims of standardised oil. 

A most popular winter line 
Write for particulars NOW 

The 

Cooper Laboratory 



Telephone : 
3612 



Watford 



Telegrams : 
" Science " 



SOLAZZI 

Liquorice Juice 



The Chemist's Brand 



Should any enquiries as to the composition 
of SOLAZZI be received from the Public, 
Chemists are requested to emphasise the fact 
that SOLAZZI is not included in the category 
of Secret Remedies, and that the following 
guarantee obtains with every parcel. 



Solazzi Juice is 

guaranteed to consist entirely 
of the condensed extract of 
finest Calabrian Liquorice Root, 
without any admixture whatever 



GLYCERINE 



We supply pure, specially 
distilled glycerine for all edible 
purposes. May we have your 
enquiries? 

GLYCERINE LTD. 

Unilever House, Blackfriars, E.C.4 



'Phone : Central 7474 
GET. 72-254 A 



'Grams : " Glymol, 
Telex, London " 



HOPKIN & WILLIAMS 



MANUFACTURERS 

OF FINE 
PHARMACEUTICAL 

CHEMICALS. 

WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS 

16 & 17 CROSS ST., LONDON, E.C. 1. 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



III 



j111ethi^(ciyted 



Prompt delivery 
from local branches 
thus obviating delay 



THE METHYLATING COMPANY LTD. 

Regd. Office : Kinnaird House, Pall Mall East, London, S.W.I 



WIRES: METHCOLIM, PHONE. LONDON' 



PHONE: WHITEHALL 6964 



Branches at London, 
Bii'mingham, Liverpool, 
Manchester, Bristol, 
Glasgow, Leith, Hull 



ALL CONTAINERS BEAR 




Please ask /or our Price List 
and Pamphlet on Methylated 
Spirits Regulations 



THIS TRADE MARK 




\ 



EPSOM SALTS 

Commercial and B.P. Qualities 
also Powdered 

Glauber's Salt 

Commercial and B.P. Qualities 
and Desiccated 

Zinc Sulphate 

Commercial and B.P. Qualities 

Zinc Chloride 

Fused, Granulated and Liquid 



WILLIAM 

BLYTHE 

&CO., LTD. 

Holland Bank Ciiemical Works 

CHURCH 

LANCASHIRE 



Hyposulphite 

of Soda Pea Crystals 

Lead Arsenate 

Paste and Powder 

Precipitated 
Sulphur 
WEED KILLER 

A list of our general Technical 
Chemicals sent on application 



IV 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



October 5, 1935 




MANUFACTURE 

GUAIACOL 



B.P. 



(CRYST. and LIQ.) 

Samples and Prices sent promptly on request. 




PROMPT SERVICE: KEEN PRICES: SOUND QUALITY, AND FREQUENT MOTOR VAN 
DELIVERIES IN THE TYNE, WEAR AND TEES AREAS. 

For fuller particulars consult page 57 
THE CHEMIST & DRUGGIST DIARY, 1935. 

BRADY & MARTIN, Ltd. Northumberland Rd., NEWCASTLE-ON-TYNE ^ 




I TO PHARMACISTS OF THE NORTH WE OFFER~| 




SAPO MOLLIS 
VIRID B.P. 



FOR PHARMACY & TOILET USE 

We are in a specially favourable position to 
quote. Prices and Samples sent on application. 
Please state quantity required. Wholesale only. 



BLEASDALE Ltd. 



MANUFACTURING 
CHEMISTS 



YORK 



WE SPECIALIZE IN 

THE MANUFACTURE OF 



GALLIC AGID-PYROGALLIG AGIO 



PURE & TECHNICAL 



RESUBLIMED, PURE CRYSTAL & TECHNICAL 



WHOLESALE & EXPORT ONLY. Enquiries Invited 

J. L. ROSE, LIMITED, ABBEY ROAD, BARKING, ESSEX 

TELEPHONE : GKANGEWOOD 0076 TELEGRAMS : " GALLIC, BARKING." 




October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



V 



Ipecac.Liq 

S«S> and BP. 1914 / 



WHIFFEN 

and Sons Lid. 
FULHAM - LONDON, S.W.6 

TELEPHONE: FULHAM 0037 • TELEGRAMS: WHIFFEN LONDON 
INCORPORATING GEORGE ATKINSON & COMPANY • EST. 1654 



vi 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



October 5, 1935 



ETHYL CHLORIDE 



CHLORYL ANAESTHETIC 

(DUNCAN) 



FOR GENERAL and LOCAL ANAESTHESIA 
IT IS INDISPENSABLE IN THE SURGERY 




Descriptive 
Booklet 
and 
Prices 
on 

Application, 



Ethyl Chloride (Duncan) Is perfectly free from 
hydrochloric acid, empyreumatic bodies, etc. 
It has a pleasant ethereal odour and its vapour 
is non-irritating. 




Supplied in 30 c.c. and 60 c.c. graduated flasks or 
in 5 c.c. hermetically sealed ampoules. 



May be had perfumed with Eau de Cologne 
if desired. 



DUNCAN, FLOCKHART & CO. 

EDINBURGH and LONDON 

104/8, Holyrood Road. 155/7, Farringdon Road, E.C.I. 



I 



I 

I 



I 




in natural 
and powder 
form 



A.F SUTER&GO.LTD 

133 FENCHURCH ST. LONDON. E.C.3 

•Phones, Mansion House 0347 (2 lines). Grams. Suteresln, Fen. London 



VISCOSITY 

While Specific Gravity is useful as a 
means of grading Liquid Paraffin, Viscosity 
is the true test of quality. 

As specialists in this material we can 
offer an Oil with a Viscosity of 
290/300 seconds at 100 F. 

"QUALITY COUNTS" 

C E T^ORLET } Son 

UNITY WORt^S 

Latimer Road E.7 



'PHONC ; MARYLAND +666 





October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



VII 



FINE CHEMICALS 



AND OPIUM DERIVATIVES 



Goods 
covered by 
Dangerous Drugs 
Acts offered 
subject to all 
regulations 



% 

Aloin • Atropine • Bismuth Salts • Caffeine • Cantharldin 
Capsicin • Chloroforni • Chrysarobin • Codeine • Diamorphine 
Emp. Canth. Liq. • Ephedrine • Ergotin • Eserine • Et+iyl- 
morphine • Gingerine • Hyoscyamine • Jalap Resin • Leptandrin 
Morphine • Opium • Podophyllin Resin • Salicin ♦ Santonin 
Scammony Resin • Strychnine • Veratrine and other 
Pharmaceutical Chemicals and Preparations. 

I 



r. a M. SNIiriHI 



CHRISTOPHER STREET, LONDON, E.C.2 




Blandfield Works, 
Edinburgh, 
32-24 Virginia St., 
Glasgow 



JAPANESE FINE CHEMICALS 

Sub - Agent Wanted 

Representative of Japanese manufacturers 
of Fine Chemicals, of World-wide repute, 
desires to establish a sub-agency for the 
United Kingdom with a Firm of standing 
in that territory. ^ 

Keplies, which must give full details of selling 
organii^ation , should he addressed to : — 

Box 267/665, " Chemist and Druggist** 



viii 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



October 5, 1935 



SPUN 

THE 
OINTMENTS 
OF 

DISTINCTION 



can't make you buy 
the finest Ointments — 

But we can make the finest 
Ointments for you to buy. 

FAMOUS FOR 30 YEARS 



COLD CREAMS & VANISHING CREAMS 

OF EVERY TYPE FOR EVERY CLIME 

ROBT. BLACKIE ™V 



Telephone: HOP 2422 

(PRIVATE EXCHANGE) 

Telegrams : 
"Ushenspuna, London" 



mm 



YOr MAY WAXT TO 

Buy a Business, Sell a Business, Secure an Agency, 
Engage an Assistant, Procure a Situation, or Sell 
Odd Lots of Chemists' Requisites 

If so, you can do it quickly and satisfaclorily by an advertisement in 

THE CHEMIST & DRUGGIST SUPPLEMENT 



THIS IS Tl 

Businesses Wanted and for DisDOsal, Premises 
ToLetand ForSale, Prem ises. Wanted, Partner- 
ships, Goods for Sale, and Agencies : 6/- for 

50 words; every additional 10 words or less, 6d. 
SITUATIONS OPEN: 6/- for 40 words; every 
additional 10 words or less, 6d. 

SITUATIONS WANTED: 2/- for 18 words; 

e\'ery additional 10 words or less, 6d. 

Legal Notices, Tenders, Auctions, and all 

specially spaced announot-raents ; 1/3 per nonpareil 
line {12 lines 1 inch sin.^le colnrnn). 
Miscellaneous (Wholesalers') Section, for odd 
and second-hand lots: 10/- for 60 words; 1/- for 
every additional 10 words or less. 

EXCHANGE COLUMN (for Retailers, etc.): 
Twopence per word, minimum 2/- 



E TARIFF: 

BOX NUMBERS 

In each case replies may be addressed to a registered 
number or nom-de-plume, c/o this office, at a charge 
of 1/- extra for each advertisement. Replies are 
cleared every day. 

Address all communications to 

THE PUBLISHER, 

THE CHEMIST & DRUGGIST 

28 Essex St., Strand, London, W.C.2 



Telegrams : 
" Chemicus, Estrand, 
London " (2 words) 



Telephone : 
Central 6565 
(8 lines) 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



ix 



FOR BIG 



BUSINES 



BEECHAM 

PRODUCTS 





BEECHAM PRODUCTS have attained their 
present popularity through MERIT. Every 
Chemist and Druggist should participate in the 
ever increasing demand for BEECHAMS Br.nd 
PILLS, BEECHAMS Brand POWDERS and 
BEECHAMS Brand LUNG SYRUP. They amply 
repay any selling co-operation extended to them. 

BEECHAM PRODUCTS never become dead 
stock — there areno losses on them — all damaged 
stock is replaced free — 
they are protected under 
P.A.T.A. regulations — 
yield good profits and 
are the best paying pro- 
positions to handle. 



STOCK MORE- 
SHOW MORE- 
iMll MORE- 

BEECHAM 
PRODUCTS 



BEECHAMS PILLS LTD. 

ST. HELENS. LANCS. 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



October 5, 1935 



SLOANS SALES 

—UP HIGHER THAN EVER THIS SEASON— 



(hev. 300^ 



Sloans Brand Liniment is a popular line 
in regular demand. Consistently advertised 
in the national and local press and broadcast 
e\'ery Sunday afternoon from Radio Luxem- 
bourg, its merits are always before the public. 

STRIKING COLOURED 
SHOWCARDS FREE and 
CARRIAGE PAID 

TRADE TERMS 




Sloans 
Brand Liniment 


List Price 
1 doz. at perdoz. 


6 doz. 
at per doz. 


12 doz. 

at per doz. 


1/9 


15/9 


15/- 


14/6 



Carriage paid on 6 doz. and over 

WILLIAM R. WARNER & Co. Ltd • (Sole Distributors for Sloans Brand Liniment) 300 Cray'S Iflll Road, LondOH, W.C.I 




LUNG TONIC 
for COUGHS and COLDS 

Every Bottle of OWBRIDGE'S LUNG TONIC 

CARRIES A GOVERNMENT STAMP 

To Protect Our Proprietary Rights 



Our Price 



In 1 -gross lots, 1/3 size, £6.12 . 0 
in 1-doz. lots, 3/- size, £1.7.0 



Your Returns Retail 

1 gross 1/3, £9.0.0, 36i% 
1 doz. 3/-, £1 .16 . 0, 33i% 



Direct or Through your Wholesale House 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



xi 



FER B E R 
CAPSULES 



AMMONIATED QUININE CAPSULES, 60m. 
Packed in Decorated Tins, in Attractive Show Outers. 

No. 378. 10/6 per doz. tins. 

BLENOSAN CAPSULES 
Santal Oil and Oleo Resin Kava Kava Comp. 

No. 169. (Minimum Retail 4/6.) 36/- per doz. tins. 

CARBON TETRACHLORIDE CAPSULES 
Specially porified, free from Sulphur. 



In boxes of 24. 



CHILBLAIN CAPSULES 

Calcium Lactate, 5 gts. 



71- per doz. 



CINNAMON & QUININE CAPSULES 
Packed in Decorated Tins, in Attractive Show Outers. 

No. 379. 10/6 per doz. tins. 

COD-LIVER OIL CAPSULES 

No. 214. 24 X 15 m. 8/- per doz 

COD-LIVER OIL AND CALCIUM 
PHOSPHATE 

No. 217a 24 X 10 m. 6/6 per doz. 

DOG CAPSULES 

Aperient Antibilious Alterative 

Diarrhoea Cough Condition 

Mange Epilepsy and Chorea Distemper 

Worm Tonic Rheumatic 

For Medium and Large Dogs, 8/6 per doz. tubes. 
For Puppies and Fancy Dogs. 6/6 per doz. tubes. 



No. 253 



ERGOT PREPARED 
Dry fltlad Capsules, N.F. 

24 X 5 gr. 



12/- per doz. 



FERBER CAPSULE No. 600 
Containing Blaud's equal to 2 pills. Arsenical Solution 2 minims. 
Ext Nucis Vem. i grain. Phenolphthalein i grain. 

Packed 100 in decorated tins. 31/- per doz. tins. 

Minimum Retail 5/- per tin. 

HALIBUT LIVER OIL CAPSULES 
Packed in Decorated Tins, in Attractivo Show Outers. 

No. 290a. 24 X 3 m. 12 8 per doz. tins. 

HALIBUT LIVER OIL AND CALCIUM 
PHOSPHATE 

Each containing Halibut Liver Oil 2^ minims. Calcium Phosphate 
2 Grains. 

Equivalent in Vitamin A to one tablespoonful of the finest Cod 
Liver Oil, v^ith adequate Vitamin D. 
For tile treatment of Chilblains and circulatory deficiency. 
No. 292. 24 in box. 12 8 per doz. boxes. 

OPHTHALMIC CAPSULES 

Hydrarg. Ox. Flav. 1% Atropin 1% 

., 2% Argyrol 1% 

Boric Acid 10% Protargol 1% 

In boxes of 3, 12/6 per doz. boxes. 
In boxes of 6, 18/6 per doz. boxes. 

SANTAL OIL CAPSULES 

Tins, each 24 X 10 drops. 18/6 per doz. 
Tins, each 24 X 10 minims. 22/- per doz. 



No. 393. 
No. 392. 



SPECIAL CAPSULES FOR LADIES 
Packed in Decorated Tins, in Attractive Show Outers. 

No. 109. Apiol, Aloes and Iron. 9/- per doz. tins. 

Etc., Etc. 



ROBERT FERBER LTD. 

Carlton Works, Asylum Road 
LONDON, S.E.15 



^^CET 

FROM 
YOUR 

^UEIkiilCT 
VnEITII9 I 



// 




to display 

EX'LAX 

CHOCOLATE LAXATIVE 

EX-LAX LTD. SLOUGH. BUCKS 



xii 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



October 5, 1935 




A NEW LAXATIVE 

BY THE MAKERS OF DAISY POWDERS 

Chocolate-coated Tablets containing Seven Vegetable Extracts — Dandelion, 
Rhubarb, Licorice, Cascara Sagrada, Gentian, Aloin, Gingerin 

An Excellent Product. Beautifully Packed. Popular Prices, Liberal Profits. 
Order through your Wholesaler or direct 

DAISYLAX 

SEVENFOLD VEGETABLE EXTRACT 

LAXATIVES 



Trial Size 2d. 

Display Cases (3 doz.) at 
3/11 each 

(Split cases at 1/5 doz.) 



Popular Size 6d. 

Display Cases (1 doz.) at 
3/11 each 

(Split cases at 4/3 doz.) 



1/3 Size 

Display Cases (1 doz."i at 

10/- each 
(Split cases at 10/6 doz. 



J. E. ELLIS, LTD., HORSFORTH, LEEDS 



October 5. 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



xiii 



AN IMPORTANT SELLING LINE FOR CHEMISTS 




'\ Centurion 



ICALYPTUS 
MENTHOL 




ERNEST JACKSON & CO. LTD. 

•Grams : Jackson, Crediton CREDITON, DEYOK 'Phone : Crediton 10 
LONDON OFFICE: PLAINTAIN PLACE, CROSBY ROW, BOROUGH, S.E.I. Hop. 2668 



xiv 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



October 5, 1935 




oboleine 



THE FOOD THAT BUILDS THE BODY 



BONUS PARCELS 

If you have not received par- 
ticulars of the Roboleine bonus 
parcels write without delay to— 

OPPENHEIMER, SON & Cq LID CLAPHAM ROAD, LONDON, S.W.9 



I Innerclean 2/6 22/6 | 

Si\\\nmn s 2/6 20/^ 1 
Freckle Cream 



DOZ. 



Both these Hnes are now being 
advertised, and chemists are re- 
quested to meet the demand 
which we are creating 



Obtainable from all wholesalers or direct 
from the sole agents : 

Brooks ^Warburton^Lfd. 

232-240 VAUXHALL BRIDGE RD. 
LONDON, S.W.I 



IN DEMAND 



TAMAR 
INDIEN 
GRILLON 


Always advertised — so always in 
demand ! This superior fruit lax' 
ative has been popular amongst 
the best class of customer for 
half a century. 


Dr. Jaillet's 
PEPTO-FER 


A delicious and most effective 
tonic ; the prescription of a noted 
French chemist. Immensely val' 
ued as a pick-me'up for convak' 
scents and a fine tonic for an^mics. 


RIGOLLOT'S 
MUSTARD 
LEAVES 


Excellent counter irritants, cre^ 
ating a powerful revulsive 
action. 


RIGOLLOT'S 
MUSTARD 

(for veterinary 
purposes) 


A useful line for the chemist in 
a country neighbourhood. 



All enquiries {except for Pepto-Fer) to : 

GUYOT^GUENIN &? SON (Dept. CD.) 
59 Southwark Bridge Road, London, S.E.I. 

For Pepto-Fer, please write direct to : 

Dept. CD.. DARRASSE FRERES. 
13 rue Pavee, Paris IV, France. 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



XV 



PETROLEUM JELLIES 

WHITE, LEMON, YELLOW, AMBER, RED, GREEN. 

WHITE rCOLOlED OILS 

YELLOW, GREEN, RED FOR BRILLIANTINE, etc. 



LIQUID PARAFFIN 

COLOURLESS, TASTELESS, ODOURLESS. 
ALL SPECIFIC GRAVITIES. 



B.P. AND TECHNICAL QUALITIES 
Wholesale Trade only. 



STERNS LTD. 

16 FiNSBURY SQ., LONDON, E.C.2, ENGLAND 

Telephone: NATIONAL 7644 (7 lines) 
Telegrams : " CENTUMVIR, PHONES, LONDON." 





HUMAN & VETERINARY 

MADE IN ENGLAND 



I Write for Special Quantity Terms I 

I The Denver Chemical Mfg. Co., Carlisle Road, London, N.W.9 i 

iL— ■ — ■ — — 

BIR^SIDE $ 

AUSTRALIAN EUCALYPTUS OIL 

(Shipped by W. K. BURNSIDE PTY., LTD., 34/36 JEFFCOTT STREET, MELBOURNE) 

ALL B.P. GRADES 

7O/750' B.P. r, , . .— F J 80 85% B.P. 

A specially rectified Oil of Packed in Cases a nd Drums Distilled from E. POLYBRACHTEA 

high and very uniform Quality STOCKS IN LONDON The finest B.P. Oil obtainable 

All Grades can be relied upon to be Constant in Quality, Odour and Colour 

15 PHILPOT LANE AGENTS FOR U.K. .phone : mansion house 9264-5-6 

LONDON, E.C.3 WILSON & MANSFIELD, Ltd. Grams : WYFIELD, LONDON 

■ WHOLESALE ONLY 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



October 5, 1935 




TK 15 





The high concentration and extra fine quality of this 
Ginger Wine Essence give the greatest satisfaction 
to the user. The dimpled bottle is an attraction, 
while the full flavour of the contents makes repeat 
custom certain. You can rely on Pennine Brand 
to serve you well. 

The 3 oz. Bottle is the basis of 7 pints of full- 
strength Ginger Wine at a cost (with sugar) of less 
than 3d. per pint. 

"PENNINE" 

BRA ND 

GINGER 

WINE ESSENCE 

Trade Price : 5/- per dozen 

SHOWCARD AVAILABLE 



THORNTON 

Manufacturing Chemists 



& ROSS LTD. 

MILNSBRIDGE, HUDDERSFIELD 



A LINE THAT IS WELL WORTH SELLING 

LOSALL'S SALT 

^ for QOUT, RHEUMATISM, ECZEMA AND SKIN AFFECTIONS 

This chalybeate sulphur salt has a world-wide reputation . It makes an excellent 
■^k window show — is worthy of your recommendation and is a most profitable line. 

Ask us for special display terms. Full size sample tin gladly sent on application to: 

^LOFTHOUSE & SALTMER LTD. HULL 






r 



A 1.1- CHEMISTS SHOULD STOCK 



AB DI N E 



THE GOLD MEDAL HEALTH DRINK. Quick Seller. Kb Profits. 
Over 60 yeaj-s' Reputation. ^"Abdine" is obtainable from the Wholesale 
Houses. Attractive Display Material constantly available. 

DUNCAN HcGLASHANLtd., ABDINE WOfiKS, WESTFIELD Rd., EDINWJRCH 



Stock 
these 




IF YOU WOULD BRIGHTEN UP 



YOUR BUSINESS 

'BROADWAY' 'ORCHARD' 'JEANETTE' 

(ORANGE) (CHERRY) (MARTINI, 

They can be sold by any chemist with a wine licence. They are 
very popular lines, strikingly packed, with intriguing flavours 
which make them all-round favourites. 



LAMB & 



samples gladly sent on application- 
send a po't card now. 

WATT LTD. 



LIVERPOOL. 3 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



xvii 




Retails at 4/- , 
:rade price 36/- per dozen. 



THE IDEAL TONIC 
FOR SALES 



Ovoferrin is fast finding favour as the ideal general tonic for debility, 
anaemia, convalescence, asthenia, malnutrition and nervous disorders. 
Ovoferrin provides a proper and adequate supply of iron in a truly 
colloidal and stable condition, without any of the disadvantages 
usually asscciaied wilh iron. 

The medical profession is being effectively encouraged by extensive 
propaganda in all the leading medical journals, and by direct calls 
and regular circularisations. OVOFERRIN brand Colloidal Iron Tonic 
retails at 4/- (l4 days' treatment). Trdde price 36/- per dozen. 

OVOFERRIN 



Prepared hy makers oj \-\r';yr.-j/ ' 



B^AND COLLO DAL IRON TON:C 



Sole Distributors: 

FASSETT & JOHNSON, LTD., 86 CLERKENWELL ROAD, LONDON, E.G. 



TRY A 

MASON'S 

WINDOW 

DISPLAY 
AT OUR EXPENSE 

To ihose customers who allow us 
the use of their windows we offer 
5/— for their opening order for 
6 dozen MASON'S EXTRACT OF 
HERBS (or 10/- for 12 dozen). 

The window display is most 
attractive and perfectly 
simple and can be fixed 
up in a couple of minutes 

GOOD ! IT'S MASON'S 

Apply NEWBALL & MASON LTD., 
NOTTINGHAM 




The famous " Town Talk " Liquid Silver Polish, Silver 
Plate Cloth, Liquid Pewter Polish, Chromium Plate 
Cloth, and Cut Glass Cloth, afford you five ways to a 
woman's purse. They are consistently advertised in 
women's newspapers and journals, and their qualities 
make them quick-selling, repeat-order lines. 

Push the "Town Talk" 5, they yield a good 
profit and bring customers into your shop. 

ORDER DIRECT OR FROM 



MANCHESTER : 

james Woolley Sons & 
Co., Ltd. 
LEEDS : 

Goodall, Backhouse & Co. 
LEICESTER : 

E. H. Butler & Son. 



LONDON : 

Brooksfi Warburton.Ltd. 
May, Roberts & Co., Ltd. 

LIVERPOOL : 

Ayrton, Saunders & Co. 
Ltd. 



THE TOWN TALK POLISH CO. MANCHESTER 



xviii 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



October 5, 1935 




S)esigners & Makers 

of 

Quality fflassurare 

/or 



umerj. 





0 



ESTABLISHED 1123 



LIMITED 




Send us your Enquiries 
and compare our prices. 

Wholesale and Export. 

C.OLLEY& SONS, Ltd. 

Established iS4t 

Camperdown St. and Gt. Alie St., London, E.l 

Tel. No.: Royal 2868. Tel. Ad.: "Circumference, AM. London." 

METALLIC CAPSULES 

FOR ALL KINDS OF BOTTLES AND JARS 

The Tonkin Metallic Capsule Co. 

Proprietors : C. Olley Sons, Ltd. 



SPECIALISTS IN THE MANUFACTURE OF 
SOLUBLE MEDICINAL CAPSULES 



BULK 



OR 



PACKED 



^ROWN 

CSPSULI 

JCOMP/INY 



PHONE 
356 



Helensburgh 



NOW BRITISH MADE 

rAttf^ DRY mrif 




R. V. WAGNER 

33 BROOKE ST., LONDON, E.C.I Tel. Holbom 5090 



October 5. 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



xix 



^ ROYAL CHARTER 'L 




OOBSELLA" MILK FOOU 



ENGLISH DRIED MILK 



Enquiries are solicited/or the following: 

FULL CREAM •' DORSELLA" DRIED 

MILK 
HALF CREAM 
SEPARATED "PARAGON" 
CASUMEN, 

PROTEID 
SWEETWHEY, 

POWDER 
KENCREAM FOR PUPPIES 
UNITA (Dorsella and Casumen) 
DRIED BUTTERMILK 

Supplied in Bulk, Tins or Cartons 

Quotations and samples gladly sent 
on request. 



SOLUBLE MILK 
CRYSTALS or 



PRIDEAUX'S, LTD., 

MOTCOMBE, SHAFTESBURY, DORSET 

Telephone : Shaftesbury 4 



6 



D NEW PACKING 
...NOW READY 



6 



F EN N I N G S' 
LUNG HEALERS 

Packed in 5/- size, containing ten 6d. boxes. 
The 5/- size yields you a profit of 25%. 

This new 6d. size has been put on the market owing 
to constant request. We confidently expect a heavy 

demand for this new 6d. packing. 
The 5/- boxes are in an attractive design for counter 
display. 
Prices are as follows : 
5 1' size (10 — 6d. boxes) wholesale 45/- per doz. 
3/- size ... wholesale 28/- per doz. 
1/3 size ... wholesale 11/8 per doz. 
On the P.A.T.A. List. 

These packings are being advertised in the London 
National and Provincial Press. 



Proprietors : The Trustees of Alfred Fennings 
(Deceased), W.J. Bailey, F. B. Pelly and H. Hamer. 

Orders should be sent to the Wholesale Agents : — 

MESSRS. JOHN SANGER & SONS, 
258, Euston Road, London, N.W.I. 



EXPERIENCE 



& 



EXPERIMENT 




Fifty-five years of continual 
experiment and fifty-five years 
of invaluable experience to-day en- 
able the House of Lambert to offer 
their customers Caramel (Sacc-Ust.) 
representing an unequalled stan- 
dard of Quality and Reliability. 
It is always safest to buy the Best 
and the Best is always Lambert's. 



L. LAMBERT 

& CO. LTD. 

LONDON OFFICE: A PERCY STREET, LONDON. W. 1 
Telephone : MUSEUM 6102. WORKS : UXBRIDGE 



XX 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



October 5, 1935 




The ORIGINAL VISCOSE BOTTLE CAPSULES 

ensure security, hygiene and an attractive hnlsK to every bottle. 

VISKAPS seal and mould themselves to the contour of almost 
any bottle and stopper. Supplied in Wet or Dry form. 

VISKAPS can be printed with lettering or design in fast ink. 

VISKAPS can be dyed to suit any colour scheme. 

VISKRINGS are similar to VISKAPS except that they leave 
the top of the closure open, thereby allowing any printing or 
device to be seen. 

THE VISCOSE DEVELOPMENT CO., LTD., BROMLEY, Kent. 

Mavitlnchner'. of ihe famous VISKAPS for over 30 years. 



COMPACT 

& COMPLETE 

f 

/or 



or the rapid 
and economical 
production oi 
superfine powders 

Combined Feeding, Grinding. 
Sifting and Dust collecting plant 

made by 




Gardners 

This compact Gardner plant enables the 
Chemist and Druggist to produce his 
own powders etc., of the very highest 
quality. 

The grindi ng unit produces an almost 
impalpable powder ; the sifter and dust 
collector effectively eliminate all but the 
finest, smooth, free running particles. 
The powders so economically produced 
by tHis machine will provide many new 
and profitable lines. 

WM. GARDNER & SONS (GLOUCESTER) LIMITED 

London Office : 19 Gray's fnn Chambers. 20 High Holboni, W.C.L 
Telephone ■ Chancery 7347. 



CHEMIST SIGNS 

ILLUMINATED FROM 65/- 
NON-ILLUMINATED FROM 47/6 

SEND FO R ILLUSTRATED CA TALOGUE 

SCINTILLATING SIGN SERVICE 
68^ COLEBROOKE ROW 
ISLINGTON N.1 

TELEPHOX'E CLERKENWELL 1310 



1 CARBOY STANDS 
I AND TILTER. 

^ For drawing off small 
§ quantities of acids, etc., 
Q from Carboys, with ease 
Q and safety. 

^ The Carboy can be tipped 
§ to any position with one 
Q hand. 

B =: 

iLEtGH & SONS, 




Q Orlando Iron Works 
I BOLTON. 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



xxi 



728^ 

PROFIT ON COST 




IT will pay you to study carefully the excellent terms 
obtainable on SHERLEY'S Tonic and Condition 
Powders and see how much you gain. 
There is always a big demand for this quick and ready seller. 
2^% Discount on £2 Parcels Plus a further 5% for Window Display 

A £2 parcel of Sherley's Tonic and Condition Powders shows a profit on cost of no less than 72"8"o. 
You can make up a £2 order consisting entirely of Tonic and Condition Powders, or an assorted 
parcel of any of our foods and medicines which retail at prices not exceeding 6/-. Moreover, all 
Tonic and Condition Powders included in £2 parcels are invoiced at the special quantity prices 
quoted alongside, irrespective of the quantity ordered. 

Thus the pt-ofit on Tonic and Condition Powders, when forming part of a £2 
parcel, is still at the rate of 72-8°o on outlay. 

Make up a £2 parcel today ! An excellent range of Show Material is available and orders 
may be booked direct or through your usual wholesaler. 

SHE R LEY'S 

Tonic and Condition Powders 



RETAIL 


TRADE 


9 Powders 


4/- per dozen 
3 / 9 per dozen for 2 dozen 
or over, or for any quan- 
tity included in £2 parcels 


l'3 

24 Powders 


10/- per dozen 

per doz. for 1 doz. 
or over, or for any quan- 
tity included in £2 parcels 


2 '6 

54 Powders 


20/- per dozen 
18/9 per doz, for 1 doz, 
or over, or for any quan- 
tity included in £2 parcels 



In 3 strengths for small, medium and larqe dogs. 



A. F. Sherlev & Co., Ltd., 18 Marshalsea Road, London, S,E,1 



BATTLE'S 
VERMIN 
KILLER 



Of all Patent Medicine 
Houses at 3/-, 5/- 
and 9/- per dozen. 

In packets at 5d., 
9d. and 1/3 each 
(P.A.T.A.) 



The sure destructive agent wliich may be 
confidently recommended by Chemists for 
quick clearance of rats and mice. 
{Users' testimonials on request.) 

Prepared only by 

J. G. M. BATTLE, Ph.C, LINCOLN 



TAPERED. PYRAMID. DOMED AND 
FLANGE CORKS 



COMPOSITION AND BAKELITE 

STOPPERS 



THE MOST COMPETITIVE MANUFACTURERS IN 
THIS COUNTRY 



MUNDET CORK PRODUCTS, LTD. 

12/18 ABBEY ST., TOWER BRIDGE ROAD, S.E.I 



Telegrams: 

MUNDETCOMP, BERM, LONDON 



Telephone: 
HOP 2043-4-5 



ON «-^ALL ORDERS 

ocT.r.^tois*.'^ 



Be ready 
for National 
R AT WE EK 

T.HARUEV \.*A 

Rodine Works, 

PERTH, Scotland. 



I FREE TIN with orders 
for one dozen 7jd. size or 
equivalent in other sizes 
ordered through your 
wholesaler October ist — 
15th inclusive. 

Free display materials, 
including attractive show- 
cards for a seven days' 
window display to be sent 
to you as soon as your 
wholesaler notifies us of 
your order. 

On orders placed direct 
with our works, October 
ist — 15th, for minimum 
30'-, carriage paid, less 
10% — six tins of 

RODINE given free, con- 
ditional upon window dis- 
play of materials we send. 



XXII 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



October 5, 1935 



THIS DISPLAY 

SELLS *ASPRO* 




£ BRINGS CUSTOMERS 

INTO YOUR SHOP 

The window display illustrated above definitely sells * ASPRO'. it connects 
up with the largest advertising campaign of its kind in the world. When you 
display it, you get the benefit of * ASPRO' advertising just as though you 
paid for the advertisements yourself — the non-displayer loses customers and 
loses profit. The present change of the weather conditions is causing a great 
demand for * ASPRO'. We suggest, therefore, that if you have an 'ASPRO' 
display you show it. If you have not one — then write us to-day, and we will 
send the above set by return of post. Do not forget, either, the 'ASPRO' 
service of Chemists' envelopes and bags. They are good business pullers — 
they save you money. Let us assure you here that our sales activities are 

being vigorously pushed. House-to-house broad- 
sheeting is in operation, backed by heavy national 
advertising. We advertise 'ASPRO' continuously. If 
you keep on displaying 'ASPRO' advertising material 
'ASPRO' customers will keep on coming to you. 

'ASPRO' consists of the purest AcetYlsalicylic add that has ever been known to Medical 
Science, and its claims are based on its superiority. 

Made in England by 

ASPRO LTD., SLOUGH, BUCKS. 




Phone : Slough 608 

AN 'ASPRO' No proprietary right is claimed in the method of manufacture 
WINDOW STICKER or the formula. 



[56/30] 



ChI M I sflf' Druggist 

■1 SUPPLEMENT J^M 

|ilii|ii|jflS||££iifl 28 ESSEX STREET, LONDON, W.C. 2 ^HflHlM^B 




ADVERTISEMENT 
TARIFF 

ALL ADVERTISEMENTS are 
PREPAID, so that remittance 
must accompany instructions in 
each case. If it be necessary 
to telephone or telegraph an 
urgent announcement this may 
be done, provided the money is 
telegraphed at the same time. 



BUSINESSES WANTED and for DISPOSAL, PREMISES TO LET and 
FOR SALE, PREMISES WANTED, PARTNERSHIPS, GOODS for 
SALE and AGENCIES — 6/- for 50 words ; every additional 10 words 
or less, 6d. (Box No., 1/- extra.) 

SITUATIONS OPEN — 6/- for 40 words; every additional 10 words or less, 6d. 
(Box No., 1/- extra.) 

SITUATIONS WANTED— 2/- for 18 words ; every additional 10 words or less, 
6d. (Box No., 1/- extra.) 

LEGAL NOTICES, TENDERS, AUCTIONS, and all specially-spaced announce- 
ments, 1/3 per nonpareil line (12 lines = 1 inch single column). (Box No., 1/- extra.) 

MISCELLANEOUS (Wholesalers') Section for odd and second-hand lots— 10/- 
for 60 words: 1/- for every additional 10 words or less. (Box No., 1/- extra.) 

EXCHANGE COLUMN (for Retailers, etc.) — ^Twopence per word, minimum 2/-. 
(Box No., 1/- extra.) 



THE CHEMIST & DRUGGIST, 28 Essex St., Strand, London, W.C.2 

Telephone : Central 6565 (8 lines). Telegrams : " Chemicus, Estrand, London." 



CLOSING FOR PRESS 
FIRST POST 



must reach us 
no( later than 



AW adverfisements fnfended for 
insertion in this Supplement 

THURSDAY MORNING 



ORRIDCE & CO. 

We make no charge to purchasers, and 

1. — S. JyONDON.— High-dass Retail and Dispensing Business; old- 
established; returns 1934, £3,200, 1935 shows an increase; attractive 
pharmacy, very well fitted and stocked; excellent position; valuation 
terms entertained. 

2. — LONDON, N.W. — Middle-dass Cash Retail Business; established 
45 years; increasing turnover, 1934-35 being £2,244 with net profit 
£552; Accountant's figures ; prominent shop ; rent £92 los. per annum ; 
rates about £20; long lease; stock and fixtures worth about £950; 
price to be arranged. 

3. — N. LONDON. — Recently-estabUshed business with increasing 
turnover, at present about £18 weekly plus N.H.I. ; double-fronted 
shop on main arterial road; very good frontage; stock and fixtures 
worth about £370 ; good hving accommodation ; rent £75 ; held on lease; 
good house, at present sublet ; price tor quick sale £420 all-at. 

4. — GOLDERS GREEN (NEAR).— Good-dass Retail Business with 
steadily increasing turnover, 1934 being £2,506; Accountant's figures; 
excellent profits; attractive modem double-fronted shop, very well 
fitted and stocked; price all-at £1,550. 

5- — LONDON, S.E. — Working-dass Business in busy main road; 
increasing turnover, 1934-35 being £2,921; Chartered Accountant's 
figures; modem shop with living accommodation over; held on lease; 
price £1,500 or valuation terms entertained. 

6. — CROYDON (NEAR) .-—Good-dass General Retail Business ; returns 
last year about £1,500 witn gross profit about 40 per cent. ; double-fronted 
shop; main road position; stock and fixtures worth about £850; new 
lease will be granted or possibly the property could be purcliased ; good- 
class district; price for business £1,150, or without Optical, which is 
small, £1,000. 

7. — LONDON, W. — Old-fashioned Dispensing Business with good 
and middle-dass dientfele ; estabUsUed 1830; for safe entirely on account 
of the Vendor's ill-health; business has been neglected and the returns 
for tlie last finandal year were £1,032 ; Accountant's figures ; attractive 
snop ; rent £100 ; sublet 15s. per week ; price £500 all-at or near offer for 
early sale. 

8. — E. LONDON.— Neglected Business for sale on account of bereave- 
ment; returns for last 12 montiis £750 ; new lease will be granted at £40 
per auniun; rates £28; price for quick sale £250 all-at or very near 
ofter; scope for increase witu energetic management. 

9. — HAMPTON COURT (NEAR).— Good Middle-dass Business in 
residential district; returns 1934, £870; present year at the rate of 



HILL, E.C.4 

Telephone Nos. : CITY 2283 & 7477 



56 LUDGATE 

ESTABLISHED 1846 

May be CONSULTED at their Offices on MATTERS of SALE, PURCHASE & VALUATION 

nvite intending buyers to communicate with us, stating their requirements 

£i,ioo; excellent profits ; rent £50; rates £15; price £150 for goodwill 
plus stock and fixtures at valuation. 

10. — MIDDLESEX SUBURB. — Drug and Domestic Stores offering 
scope for increase; present returns about £40 weekly; Chartered 
Accountant's figures; rent £125 inclusive; long lease; offers invited; 
good opening for qualified man. 

11. — ROCHESTER (NEAR). — Drug Store for disposal in good 
position ; profit £5 per week, could be increased ; low expenses ; genuine 
reason for disposal; price all-at £250 or near offer. 

12. — SOUTH COAST. — Cash Retail Business; returns exceed £3,500 
per annum ; excellent living accommodation ; stock and fixtures worth 
about £1,800; further details upon application. 

13. — ROMFORD (NEAR). — Cash Retail Business with side line; 
net profit over £400 per annum ; rent £48 per annum; long lease; stock 
and fixtures worth £550; price all-at £750. 

14. — -BUCKS. — Cash Retail Business in good position; retums, 
present rate £32 per week imder management; low overheads; price 
£350 or near offer. 

15. — BOURNEMOUTH (NEAR).— Dmg Store for immediate disposal ; 
takings last year £900, increasing; stock and fixtures wortli £350; good 
Uving accommodation; purchase price £375 aU-at; part payment terms 
entertained. 

16. — FARNBOROUGH (NEAR). — Family Retail Business; returns 
last year £1,650; good profits; excellent living accommodation; price 
all-at £1,250 ; ill-healtfi cause of sale. 

17. — MID SUSSEX (COUNTRY TO^VN) .—General Retail Business 
for disposal; net profit about £335 per annum; Accountant's figures; 
good hving accommodation ; price all-at £700. 

18. — WESTCLIFF-ON-SEA (NEAR).— Dmg Store for disposal; 
returns present rate average about £15 per week; stock worth £120; 
good Uving accommodation; long lease; price all-at £275. 

19. — MANCHESTER (NEAR). — Branch Business for disposfU; 
present takings £750 per annum; growing district; low rent and good 
lease; stock wortn £360 ; price, fixtures and goodwill, £100 plus valuation 
of stock ; part can be left deferred. 

20. — BRIGHiON. — For immediate disposal owing to breakdown in 
health; good-dass business taidug £1,200 per annum; reasonable 
rental ; nice living accommodation ; low price will be accepted. 

21. — LONDON. — Several small Retail Businesses lor disposal at 
present run under management; low purcuase prices; part-payment 
terms considered; initial payment £50-£ioo. 



Chemists' Transfers, Valuations for Saie, Stooktaldng & Probate 

Special Terms for Income Tax Valuations and Preparation of Accounts by Qualified Accountants. 



xxiv 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST SUPPLEMENT 



October 5, 1935 



Bank Chambers,529 High Hoiborn.London, 

Telephone Nos. : Holborn 7406 & 7407 (2 lines) W.C.I 

15 Bridge Street, Walsall Telephone : Walsall 3774 

Lancashire and District Represantative : Mr. E. BROWN, 21 Davenport Road, Hazel Qrove, Stockport. Telephone : Great Moor 2405 



ERNESTJ. GEORGE & Co. 



Cofrespoudence, iitttfiiaUy confidential, is invited from prospective purchasers 
of the foUnwing businesses at present available for purchase. 

(Ci) SURREY (NEAR TO I.ONDON).— Attractive modem pharmacy 
occupj'mg strategic position in prominent shopping thoroughfare of 
rapidly -growing middle-class area; turnover steadily increasing; last 
year's returns amounted to ^2,963, with a gross profit of approximately 
3 5 per cent. ; good living accommodation at present sublet ; exceptional 
scope for optics ; price all-at £2,500. 

(C2) BOURNEMOUTH (NEAR).— Drug Store, recently established, 
doing at present approximately £20 weekly ; main-road situation ; rent 
£125 per annum, including good living accommodation; exceptional 
scope; quick sale desired and owner will accept £375 all-at; stock and 
fixtures estimated at £350. 

(C3) DEVON. — Old-established pharmacy with large house attached; 
turnover under management £20/^25 weekly, with scope for immediate 
increase ; no opposition ; business and property can be purchased for 
an outlay of £600/^700 after allowing for mortgage on property; further 
particulars upon apphcation. 

(C4) SURREY. — Progressive modern pharmacy situated in rapidly- 
growing district; present returns approximately £1,900 per annum; 
main-road situation; abundant scope for extensive development; price 
about £1,400. 

(C5) BRIGHTON. — Main-road business, neglected, but with excellent 
opportunities for increase; living accommodation; owner desirous of 
quick sale for genuine reasons, and will accept first reasonable offer; 
full particulars upon apphcation. 

(C6) MANCHESTER SUBURB. — Up-to-date middle-class business, 
situated in populous residential area ; no near opposition ; turnover 
upwards of £2,000 per annum; net profit £50o/£55o; low rental; price 
all-at, £r,650. 

(C7) MORDEN (NEAR). — Good middle-class business with some 
optics ; steadily increasing returns, which fur last financial year amounted 
to £i,87K; net profit, £40o/£45o; modern flat above; stock and fixtures 
estimated at £950; for quick trausaction owner will sell at sacrifice price 
of £1,100 all-at; splendid opportunity, particularly for chemist-optician. 

(C8) MIDDI,ESEX.— Old-established excellent profit-earning business 
situated in growing area; turnover approximately £2,600 per annum; 
net profit to owner-proprietor £65o/£7oo ; low rental; long lease; price 
£2,250 all-at, or near offer. 

(Cg) NORTH EAST (COASTAI^ TOWN).— Old-established, good-class 
lock-up pharmacy, occupying central position in main shopping area; 
turnover upwards of £2,000 per annum; rent £120; price all-at £1,000. 



(Cio) HIGHGATE (NEAR). — Main-road middle-class business showing 
steady and consistent increase; present returns approximately £2,500 
per annum; certified net profit for 1934-35, £552; for current year 
should approximate £650 ; audited accounts available; strongly recom- 
mended from personal knowledge. 

(Cri) MUSWEIyl, HILIv (NEAR).— Good family business, in present 
bands 40 years; large panel; turnover now approximately £1,500 per 
annum, with plenty of scope for further increase; self-contained house; 
owner retiring; £300 is asked for goodwill plus value of stock and fixtures; 
open to offer. 

(C12/ HIGHBURY (NEAR). — Cash drag store in good residential area; 
present returns approximately £1.200 per annum; good scope for N.H.I, 
and private dispensing; h'ving accommodation; property for sale, or 
lease at £120; owner retiring; stock approximately £410; price asked, 
f Soo ; open to offer. 

(C13) I^ANCASHIRE TOWN. — Double-fronted main-road pharmacy 
situated in central position; certified turnover for 1934/35, £1,620; 
net profit £450 ; excellent living accommodation ; property can be 
purchased or taken on lease; reasonable goodwill accepted, plus value 
of stock and fixtures. 

(C14) WESTCLIFF. — Splendid opportunity for enterprising chemist to 
acquire good progressive family business in prominent residential district; 
accountants' figures; turnover for last yeax, £1,363; net profit, £335; 
rent, £100, including good house; first reasonable offer secures; well 
recommended from personal knowledge; part of purchase money could 
probably be raised on loan if desired. 

(C15) LONDON AND DISTRICT. — Several businesses with good 
scope for further development, are available for purchase at low figures ; 
if desired, initial sums of £5o/£ioo down and the balance by periodical 
instalments, will be accepted; present turnovers vary between £750 
and £1,400 per annum; further details upon apphcation. 

(C16) SUSSEX. — Attractive modern lock-up pharmacy situated in 
popular seaside resort (not Brighton); turnover upwards of 1^2,000 per 
annum; rent £150; situated in shopping street, in definitely improving 
position; price £1,450, or reasonable offer. 

(C17) FIFESHIRE.— Old-estabUslied retail business with property; 
present returns approximately £1,300 per annum; excellent scope for 
further considerable development, as the premises occupy a leading 
position in the main shopping centre; further particulars upon applica- 
tion. 

(C18) ILFORD. — Prominently situated; nett profit approx: £600 
per annum ; living accommodation ; reasonable purchase price for quick 
sale, which is desired owing to other interests. 



Valuations for transfer, probate, income tax, etc., promptly executed at economical rates. 



BERDOE & FISH 

CHEMISTS' VALUERS AND TRANSFER AGENTS. 

41 ATgyle Square, KING'S CROSS. W.C.I 

(One minute from St. Pancras and King's Cross Stations.) 

1_S0UTH COAST.— Good-class Family and Dispen.sing, not a 
seasonal trade; returns £1,900; gross profit over £700; double- 
fronted shop (locU-up); well fitted and stocked; good position; 
price £1,4.50; personally recommended. 

2.— HOME COUNTY (20 miles out).— Middle-class Cash Ketail; 
in busy town; turnover about £30 weekly; plenty of scope; good 
house and shop; well stocked; price £850 or near offer. 
- 3.— EASTERN COUNTY.— Medium-class Light Retail, in impor- 
tant town; returns average nearly £1,000; low rent on lease; well 
fitted shop (lock-up); stock worth £350; genuine reasons for sell- 
ings price £550, or valuation plus small goodwill. 

4 _\VESTCLIFF-ON-SEA.— Sound, progressive Cash Business; re- 
turns £1,363, net profit £335, audited books; modern corner shop, 
flat over; rent £100; price £800 or first reasonable offer. 

5. — SUSSEX COAST. — Well-established Business; pleasantly 
situated on sea front; turnover about £20 weekly; good house-; 
long lease; price about £325, little more than valuation. 

6. — EAST HAM (near).— Progressive Cash Retail with excellent 
Panel; returns under management nearly £1,400, net profit about 
£350; modern Pharmacy; price £725 or otter. 

■ 7.— LONDON, S.W. (busy main road).— Light Cash Retail; show- 
ing steady increase; present returns appro.^. £1,500 per annum; 
rent £75, on lease; good stock; owner leaving retail; price £650 
or close offer. Also Drug Stores; returns £900; price £350. 

8. —SOUTH LONDON.— Quick Cash Retail; in busy marketing 
centre; turnover approaches £3,000.; modern pharmacy, with 
living accommodation; well stocked; books audited; lowest cash 
price £1,500. 

9. — HOllNSEY (near).— Sound Middle-class Business, with excel- 
lent Panel; returns las-t year £1,480; neglected; was doing 
£1,850; owner retiring; well-equipped Pharmacy; good position; 
stock worth £600 ; offers invited ; personally recommended. 

10. — LONDON, E.— Well-established Drug and Photo Store; re- 
tm-ns £700; under Indifferent management; splendid chance for 
Chemist; price, including freehold, £500, plus stock (about £80). 

BUSINESSES WANTED. 

We have a large number of genuine Cash Buyers seeking sound 
concerns showing from £300 to £800 net profit yearly, and 
intending vendors desirous of a quick sale, without any publicity, 
should communicate with us at once. 



Estab. 1870. 



Telephone : Terminus 3374. 



S. F. CLARK, F.N. A. A. P.o7pectV366 

CHEMISTS' VALUER & TRANSFER AGENT 
34 Marksbury Avenue, Richmond, Surrey 

Has several businesses for exclusive disposal, and invites applications 
from purchasers. All matters receive his personal, prompt, and 
confidential attention. Valuations for all purposes undertaken 
upon moderate terms. 



THE ASSOCIATION OF MANUFACTURING CHEMISTS, 

LIMITED ' 
((Business Agency, Transfer & Valuation Department) 

KIMBERLEY HOUSE, and at EXCHANGE CHAMBERS^ 
Holborn Viaduct, LONDON, E.C.i 2 Bixteth St., LIVERPOOL. 

PARKIN S. BOOTH, Valuer. Tels.: CITY3691 (4lines). 

VALUATIONS. SALES OF BUSINESSES. STOCKTAKINGS. 

Enguiries Invited. 



JSHN BRIERLEY, F.N.A.A. 

THE RECOGNISED CHEMISTS' VALUER & TRANSFER AGENT 

135 Queen Street, Newton Heath, MANCHESTER 

I have a clientele second to none requiring sound con- 
cerns (anywhere) bur preferably Midlands and Fylde 
district. 

Intending Vendors, now or later, write me — " I specialise" 



CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

Established- Will clients please note that we have moved from 
nearly a century our Old address in Victoria St., and are now at 
GROSVENOR CHAMBERS, BLACXFRIARS ST., MANCHESTER 

THOS. TOMLINSOH & SON rSSBR^S 



Telegrams : TOMTOM, M/C. 



Telephone : Marple 332 



i 



October 5. 1935 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST SUPPLEMENT 



XXV 



BUSINESSES FOR DISPOSAL. 



6s. for 50 words or less ; 6d. for every additional 10 words 
or less, prepaid. (Box No., Is. extra.) 



BERKSHIRE.— Drug Store; good position; suit young married 
Qualilied; turnover could be doubled in very short time; 
at present doing £600; stock and fixtures about £250; a long 
lease at moderate rent; up-to-date flat over shop, also yard and 
garage at back. What offers'? Urgent. 18/ 9, Office of this Paper. 

DEVON-DORSET COAST.— Good-class Business, in small holiday 
resort, in beautiful surroundings; small house, with up-to-date 
fitted shop; receipts £1,200 (increasing); good profits; no other 
Chemist; property £1,000; business £750 (all in). 23/2, Office 
of this Paper. 

EASTERN COUNTIES.— Smart Fully-equipped Pharmacy; double- 
fronted ; beautifully fitted ; suit semi-retired or lady ; 
healthiest part of England; worked single-handed; at present 
doing £15 per week, with plenty of scope for increase; rent and 
rates 37s. per week; held on lease, 21 years, renewable every 7. 
What offers? Agents' letters ignored; no triflers. 21/13, Office 
of this Paper. 

LANCASHIRE. — Wholesale Business for disposal; turnover 
approximately £12,000, and increasing; large proportion own 
Proprietaries; main-road warehouse at low expense; business cap- 
able of substantial expansion and is excellent opportunity. Write 
for details, 15/38, Office of this Paper. 

LONDON, S.W.ll. — Owner, having left Retail Pharmacy and 
shortly leaving England, desires to dispose of Business, at 
present in charge of manager; net profit to owner-manager £300 
p. a.; well stocked; £325 is a conservative figure; working-class 
district, with genuine scope for increase; quick sale desired, as 
owner wishes to relinquish connection with retail entirely; price 
£500 or otter, all in. 24/4, Office of this Paper. 

•\rOTTINGHAM, CENTRAL.— Good opportunity to acquire well- 
l\ established Business at reasonable figure ; scope for imme- 
diate improvement; price £350 plus stock, approx. £400, 
stock, fixtures and goodwill. 24/5, Office of this Paper. 

SOUTHEND-ON-SEA.— Chemist's Double-fronted Shop, with good 
living' accommodation ; low rent; well stocked; trade £20 per 
week; price £350, all at. Station Estate Office, Prittlewell. 

WARAVICKSHIRE.— Industrial town; busy main-road position; 
double-fronted shop; well stocked and fitted; living accom- 
modation; low overlieads; takings about £30 weekly; net profit 
£300; chartered accountant's figures; N.H.I. 5-6,000 yearly; 
Kodak, Selo, Ucal Agencies; stock and fixtures £750 (N.P.U. 
valuation); price £900, all at; genuine buyers only, please. 22/13, 
Office of this Paper. 

LIGHT RETAIL AND PHOTOGRAPHIC— Cash business; old 
established; central position; busy inland health resort, 
South-East County; returns for last 3 years average £26; well 
fitted and stocked; living accommodation over shop: long lease; 
opportunity for increase for energetic man ; goodwill and lease 
£250; stock and fixtures at valuation. 21/4, Office of this Paper. 

MODERN beautifully fitted Chemist's Business for immediate dis- 
posal, in good locality ; takings £38 per week, and increasing; 
rent £200; flat let at £78; stock £550; scope and room for 
Chemist-Optician. iMain-road position Chemist's Business for dis- 
posal; heavy N.H.I. ; takings £48 per week; stock £600; nicely 
fitted; rent £120, sublet £58. Price and further particulars on 
application, 23/48, Office of this Paper. 

OPENED earlier this year in a very busy part of Bournemouth, 
double-fronted, lock-up; average weekly takings under man- 
agement £12; capable of considerable development; rent and all 
rates just over £1 a week; genuine reason for disposal at the 
extremely low price £250 complete, of this, £100 may be paid by 
instalments; any further information and fullest investigation at 
interview. 24/8, Office of this Paper. 



BUSINESSES WANTED. 



LONDON SUBURBS (North or East preferred).- Chemist with 
capital is open to purchase business; takings about £2,000; 
accountant's figures necessary; all information given in confidence. 
22/18, Office of this Paper. 

qOUTHERN COUNTIES AND LONDON.-Pharmacist with limited 
KJ capital desires to purchase good-class business; definite sum 
down, and repayment over an agreed period ; interest would be 
paid on remainder; would consider partnership with view to early 
succession; excellent references; living accommodation would be 
required; replies in confidence. 21/12, Office of this Paper. 



REQUIRED at once, good Dispensing and Family Business; turn- 
over not less than £1,800 p. a.; situated within 50 miles of 
London, or in Outer London itself; cash transaction; would like 
option to purchase property, if available, after an agreed period. 
23/55, Office of this Paper. 

REQUIRED, immediately, by private purchaser with substantial 
available capital resources, several Sound Businesses within 
a 75-mile radius of Birmingham, showing returns of £2,000 per 
annum and upwards; good prices will be paid for suitable pro- 
positions; bankers' references available; all negotiations conducted 
in a strictly private manner; introductions can be arranged at 
once. Please communicate initially, and under guaranteed assur- 
ance of confidence, with Ernest J. George & Co., 15 Bridge Street, 
Walsall. Telephone : 3774. 



PREMISES TO LET. 



QUEEN'S PARK, N.W.— Fine new Premises adjoining Station; 
busiest position in district; splendid opening for Chemist; rent 
of £250 includes flat over. Full particulars from Vickers & 
Stanley, 1 jVIanchester Square, W.l. Welbeck 1158. 

pHEMIST BADLY WANTED.— Parade of 13 shops and flats, 
vj junction of five main roads and adjoining super cinema; 
S.E. London (5 'bus routes pass); frontage 22 ft., depth 40 ft.; 
8 let, including 7 to multiple companies; rent £250 per annum, 
including 2 self-contained flats; trades represented: butcher, green- 
grocer, tailor, cleaner, gas and electricity showrooms, tobacconist, 
bank. Apply Healey & Baker, 29 George Street, Hanover Square, 
W.l. Mayfair 2965. 

HIGH-CLASS Shops to Let in new parade in best part of High 
Road, Streatham, from fl40-£500 per annum. Apply 
Letting Manager, 17 Streatham High Road, 'phone Streatham 
9627, or Bell Investment Trust, Ltd., 115 Park Street, Mayfair," 
W.l. .'Phone Mayfair 4201. 

PARADE OF ELEVEN NEW SHOPS.— Lovely living accommoda- 
tion; low rent; all Staybrite steel fronts; one suitable for 
a Chemist. Apply Station Estate Office, Prittlewell, Southend-on- 
Sea. 

POPULOUS S.E. SUBURB.— Chemist required for shop adjoining 
doctor's surgery in populous built-up area; rental for shop, 
with living accommodation, £135 per annum. J. W. Bettyes, Shop 
Property Specialists, 26 Langham Street, W.l. Langham 4211-2-3. 

SHOPS at Greenford.— Wonderful opening for a Chemist in finest 
main-road position ; rents from £200 p.a. ; frontages 20 ft. 
by 40 ft.; electric railway coming. Apply Letting Office on site, 
corner of Clifton Road, Greenford Road, Greenford. 'Phone Peri- 
vale 1905. 



APARTMENTS. 



THE HAMPDEN RESIDENTIAL CLUB 

FOR GENTLEMEN, Hampden Street, N.W.I. Close to King's 
Cross and Euston. 300 Bedrooms. 12s. 6d. to 25s. per week, 
including bath, attendance and boot cleaning. All meals k la carte 
in dining room. Moderate tariff. Large Club Rooms, Library, 
Billiards Room, Reading Room and Study for Students. Illustrated 
Prospectus from Secretary. Euston 2244/5. 



FINANCIAL. 



MORE Capital required to extend two progressive lines, Medical 
and Pharmaceutical; patented in England and U.S.A. Write 
23/49, Office of this Paper. 



AGENCIES. 



6s. for 50 words or less ; 6d. for every additional 10 words 
or less, prepaid. (Box No., Is. extra.) 



A FIRM of Disinfectant Manufacturers, having produced a trans- 
parent product in cube form, which is now creating an 
alluring sale, would consider Shippers and Agents for trade abroad. 
Zamo Manufacturing Co., Newington Green, London N.16. 



"PNGLISH MANUFACTURERS OF SURGICAL RUB- 
BER GOODS (PROPRIETARY BRAND) ARE 
OPEN TO GRANT SOLE CONCESSIONS FOR UNITED 
KINGDOM TO A FIRM OF DISTRIBUTORS HAVING 
FIRST-CLASS CONNECTION WITH RETAIL CHEM- 
ISTS, HAIRDRESSERS, etc. 267/671, Office of this 
Paper. 



XXV i 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST SUPPLEMENT October 5, 1935 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES. 

MANUFACTURING Business (long established), with inaportant 
uistributiiig connection amongst Grocers and Chemists, de- 
sues to extend operations by acquiring whole or controlling interest 
in sound busine^s with similar connections alid outlets. Full par- 
ticulars (in confidence) to " Advertisers," c/o Nordon & Co., 
Solicitors, Regis House, King William Street, E.C.4. 

PARTNERSHIPS. 

ACTIVE Directorship and Partnership available; invest £2,000 
in 500 ordinary shares and 1,500 7i per cent, preference 
shares, unique opportunity, salary £520; in a well-established 
business in the Vv holesale Manufacturrag of Toilet and Beauty 
Preparations. Write P.C.B. 178/23, Oiflce of this Paper. 

-Pztnn INVESTMENT offered to Gentleman with large connec- 
3i/y:UU tion with Chemists' Stores; nominal salary and good 
commission; Lancashire, Scotland (3 openings). Midlands; Proprie- 
tary lines sold by over 10,000 buyers; further developments later; 
only experienced Salesmen wanted. 23/17, Office of this Paper. 



SITUATIONS OPEN. 



RETAIL (HOME). 



6s. for 40 words or less ; 6d. for every additional 10 words 
or less, prepaid. (Box No., 1s. extra.) 

ACCRINGTON. — Smart Qualified Junior, either sex; one just 
Qualified would be suitable; progressive salary. Usual parti- 
culars and photo (returned) to J. S. Snell, Ltd., 3 Whalley Road, 
'Accrington. 

BRISTOL.— Wanted, Qualified Manager. Also Unqualified Assist- 
ant. Apply in both cases, stating full particulars, to F. H. 
Moss, Esq., M.P.S., 120 Whiteladies Road, Chfton, Bristol, 8. 

LONDON. — Junior or Improver wanted; permanency for right 
man. Apply, with references, to I. Bowen, Chemist, 37 
Golborne Road, London, W.IO. 

LONDON.— Qualified and Unqualified Male Assistants (23-30) re- 
quired; City or West-End experience essential; write, stating 
full particulars, enclosing photograph; applications not answered 
in 7 days declined with thanl<s. Staff Manager, Hancocls & Co., 
144 Fleet Street, London, E.C.4. 

LONDON. — Qualified Assistant required, Lady or Gent., for part- 
time post; suitable for one pursuing a course of evening 
study. Full particulars to 268/685, Office of this Paper. 

LONDON, N. — Young, Unqualified Assistant required for Family 
business; quiclt and accurate Dispenser, N.H.I. ; Counter and 
\\ indows ; send full particulars of experience, age, salary required 
and when disengaged. 24/20, Office of this Paper. 

LONDON, N.W.— Lady Assistant wanted. Unqualified (26 to 30), 
with good all-round experience in a Pharmacy. Please give 
full particulars of experience, age and salary required, to Davies, 
356 Neasden Lane, Neasden, London, N.W.IO. 

LONDON, W.— Manager (between 35 and 45) required; one 
with previous West-End experience essential. State full par- 
ticulars of experience and salary required to 22/4, Office of this 
Paper. 

LONDON, West End. — Manager, Qualified; experienced in good- 
class Retail, Dispensing and Window-dressing; reliable and 
trustworthy ; with recent London experience preferred and now at 
liberty ; moderate salary and commission ; permanency and pros- 
pects; state full particulars of experience and salary. Chemist, 
41 Corfton Road, Ealing. 

NORTH STAFFS.— Wanted at once. Qualified, either sex, but 
Lady preferred, for small business; light duties; state wages 
required. 23/53, Office of this Paper. 

SCARBOROUGH. — Junior or Improver wanted, Male; used to 
Good-class Dispensing Business; state experience, age and 
salary required, etc. P. A. Lund, Chemist, 94 Westborough, 
Scarborough. 

WEST END.— Junior Assistant, conscientious, willing worker, 
offered excellent opportunity of gaining first-class experience 
in all branches of modern Pharmacy; applicants must have good 
appearance, be courteous and obliging; progressive, permanent. 
Send full particulars, age, experience, stating salary, " Goodwill," 
23/34, Office of this Paper. 



WEST RIDING.— At once. Unqualified Assistant (about 24); 
must be good Salesman and Window-dresser; full particulars 
of experience, references and salary expected ; applications not 
answered in 7 days respectfully declined. 22/11, Office of this 
Paper. 

WINDSOR (near).— Unqualified Lady Assistant, Junior, chiefly 
for Dispensing and Packing. Full particulars and salary to 
23/42, Office of this Paper. 

ASSISTANT (Male), unmarried, for middle-class trade, with 
N.H.I. ; must be quick and accurate Dispenser; with sound 
references. Apply by letter, stating experience and salary re- 
quired, to R. Seldon, 115 Turnpike Lane, Horusey, N.8. 

ASSISTANT, Unqualified, required Immediately for busy N.H.I, 
and Private Dispensing in good-class business in Midlands; must 
be quick and accurate Dispenser and good Counterman; perma- 
nency; must be able to take charge of dispensing; state age, wages 
required, with photo and names of last two employers. 23/27, 
Office of this Paper. 

AT ONCE.— Junior Assistant (20-23), Unqualified; must be 
honest and bear good references; preference given to man who 
can dress Windows and good Salesman; usual hours and holidays. 
Apply, stating particulars, 9 Thurlestone Road, West Norwood, 
London, S.E.27. 

IMPROVER or experienced Youth, Dispensing, Counter, Packing; 
give full particulars of experience, state age, height and 
salary required; London, S.E.I. 24/16, Office of this Paper. 

JUNIOR Assistant, Male; quick and accurate Dispenser, N.H.I, 
and Counter; good references essential. B. W. E. Beard, 
281 Forest Road, Walthamstow, E.17. Larkswood 1358. 

JUNIOR Unqualified Assistant wanted for high-class Surrey Phar- 
macy ; male ; progressive post ; give full particulars and refer- 
ences and state salary required. 23/50, Office of this Paper. 

LADY Assistant, Unqualified, wanted for Dispensing and Light 
Counter in good-class Family Business; October 21; 
please state salary required and enclose photo, which will be re- 
turned. T. M. Ashford, Chemist, 16 Market Square, Aylesbury. 

LADY, Unqualified, thoroughly experienced, for Chemist's Toilet 
Counter, London, Central. Apply, giving full particulars, to 
268/687, Office of this Paper. 

LOCUM required; Tuesdays, 1 p.m. to 8 p.m. Clark, 12 Rich- 
mond Road, Bayswater. 

MT) Q —GENTLEMAN or Lady (any age); North London 
• Jl .O* Pharmacy; permanency; moderate commencing 
salary, but good prospects for capable person; part-time appoint- 
ment possible. State age, when free and lowest commencing salary, 
to 268/686, Office of this Paper. 

QUALIFIED Assistant wanted, about the middle of October, for 
Dispensing and Counter; single, smart and young. Write, 
with usual particulars, to A. Stedman, Chemist, Snodland, Kent. 

QUALIFIED Gentleman required for Middle-class Business, 
N.W.6; good Salesman and Window-dresser; previous ex- 
perience of Photography and Optics essential; comfortable and 
permanent position for conscientious worker. Reply, stating full 
particulars, to Pratt Bros., 73 Salisbury Road, N.W.6. 

QUALIFIED.— Good all-round man, thoroughly trustworthy, to 
open business in large Devon village, near sea ; salary and 
share profits; splendid opportunity for right man; applications 
unanswered in 7 days respectfully declined. Full particulars 
Manley, 57 Eastleigh Road, Taunton. 

QUALIFIED Male Assistant (about 25), must be a reliable and 
capable Dispenser, for a good-class country business. Apply 
with photo, stating salary and full particulars, to Bates & Himt, 
Chemists, Wellington, Shropshire. 



PHOTOGRAPHS, TESTIMONIALS, &C. 
When answering advertisements In this 
section applicants are strongly advised not to 
send (unless specially requested) ORIGINAL 
TESTIMONIALS or VALUABLE PHOTO- 
GRAPHS. As can be readily understood, 
when an advertiser receives from 100 to 
150 replies the task of returning photographs, 
testimonials, &c., is one of some difficulty. 



October 5, 1935 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST SUPPLEMENT 



xxvii 



QUALIFIED.— Young Man required for small Pharmacy, 10 miles 
London (Kent); opportunity to learn Management. Write, 
with references and salary required, to 23/43, Office of this Paper. 

KEQUIEED, permanency. Young Unqualified Male Assistant (19- 
22 years); good gentlemanly appearance for high-class 
Coauter Trade. Write, stating experience, photograph and refs. 
essential, and wages (live out), Gordon Morum, Chemist, Arcade, 
Guernsey, Channel Isles. 

UNQUALIFIED Assistant (age 20-25) required, Leeds district; 
must be neat and quiclc worlfer. Apply, with fullest parti- 
culars, including references and salary required, to 23/12, Office 
of this Paper. Applications not answered within 10 days respect- 
fully declined. 

UNQUALIFIED Assistant, male, required; smart appearance; 
quiclc and accurate Dispenser, good Salesman; S.VV. district. 
Reply, giving full particulars past experience, age, salary expected, 
whether married, to 24/14, Office of this Paper. 

UNQUALIFIED Assistant (Male) wanted for branch; must be an 
accurate Dispenser and accustomed to quick Counter Trade. 
Apply, stating age, experience, salary required, to Head Office, 
Wm. Fox & Sons, Ltd., 109, 111 Bethnal Green Road, London, E.2 
(10 minutes from Liverpool Street). 

UNQUALIFIED Assistant required at end of October; must be 
good Window-dresser and reliable Dispenser; state age and 
salary required. Apply to Early Bunn, Ltd., 95 High Street, 
Chelmsford. 

UNQUALIFIED Male Assistant required immediately as Junior 
for Counter and Dispensing in High-class Family Business. 
Particulars of age, height and salary to Stonham & Son, 70 Bank 
Street, Maidstone. 

WANTED. — Experienced Lady (Hall preferred) to take charge of 
Drug Store, immediately. Particulars and wages to Clear, 
56 Barkby Eoad, Leicester. 

WANTED.— Qualified Managing Assistant for good-class modern 
business; good knowledge of Toilet and Photographic trade 
essential. Apply, with usual particulars, to L. H. Knight, 12 
Russell Hill Road, Purley. Applications considered will be answered 
within 3 days. 

WANTED, Unqualified Male Assistant for brisk N.H.I, and 
Counter trade; references essential. Venables, 54 Fulham 
Palace Road, W.6 (3 minutes Hammersmith Broadway). 

WANTED. — Young Gentleman Assistant, Unqualified, for 2 
weeks, commencing October 28th; to help at Counter, etc.; 
Bromley district; suitable board-residence available; salary, etc., 
first instance. 22/1, OSice of this Paper. 

YOUNG Assistant wanted as Junior in a London Pharmacy. State 
full particulars as to age, height, married or single, experi- 
ence, salary required, etc., to " Ph.C," P.C.B. 178/11, Office of 
this Paper. 



WHOLESALE. 



MIDLANDS Sales Representative required by London Manu- 
facturers; applicant should be able to sell White Mineral Oils, 
Lubricating Oils, Olive Oil, Olive Oil and other Industrial Soaps. 
Apply, stating age, experience and salary required, to 267/678, 
Office of this Paper. 

A A A — TABLETMAKER and Coater required for residen- 
• rj-»XJL» tial seaside town; must be experienced in Coating; 
please state lowest commencing salary; also full details of past ex- 
perience, in confidence; excellent opportunity for right man. 25/2, 
Office of this Paper. 

AGENTS, calling on Medical Men, to carry on a commission 
basis Up-to-date Medical Specialities ; West of England, Wales, 
East Anglia; liberal terms. 267/679, Office of this Paper. 

LIVE Wire Representative wanted immediately, with first-class 
connection, for Beauty Preparations; other non-competitive 
lines not objected to. Write Keeping, 9 Southampton Street, 
W.C.I, or 'phone Holborn 5381. Permanent situation for really 
first-class representative. 

MANUFACTURING Chemists, London, middle-class Cosmetics, 
also Perfumery, require all-round Chemist; exceptional oppor- 
tunities for right man; state age, experience, situations past and 
present — treated In confidence; brevity an obstacle. 268/684, 
Office of this Paper. 



OLD-ESTABLISHED London Manufacturing Druggists require out- 
door Representative with established connection within a 
radius of 50 miles of Charing Cross; salary and expenses paid, 
together with commission; applicant must be able to drive a car, 
and hold the Society's Qualification (not over 35); please send full 
personal and commercial details, together with copies of any recent 
testimonials. 267/670, Office of this Paper. 

REPRESENTATIVES required, London and Provinces, with sound 
established conuection among Wholesale Chemists, Hair- 
dressers' Sundriesmen, Stores, etc., to introduce an exceedingly 
interesting and highly successful patented line; good commission; 
only first-grade men considered. Write fully, in confidence, stating 
territory covered, lines carried, etc., to Philli-Mirano, Ltd., 273 
Union Street, Blackfriars, London, S.E.I. 

REPRESENTATIVES required, on commission only, having a 
sound connection amongst Chemists, Health Stores, Doctors, 
Hospitals, etc., for the sale of a proprietary line of Medicinal Oil, 
of proved merit and universal appeal. State ground covered, lines 
earned and commission desired to P.C.B. 178/7, Office of this 
Paper. 

REQUIRED for City Wholesale Druggists, Young Lady for 
Ampoule work ; previous experience essential. Apply by 
letter, giving full particulars, to 268/683, Office of this Paper. 

TABLET AND PILL COATER.— Wanted, Competent Man, at 
once. Send particulars of experience, references, age and 
wage asked to Brook, Parker & Co., Horton Road, Bradford. 

TRAVELLER required in London, calling on Colonial Houses, to 
represent Proprietary Perfumes and Beauty Products; only 
those with connection need apply. Write in first instance, giving 
full particulars, 268/690, Office of this Paper. 

TRAVELLERS required in London and the Provinces to represent 
Proprietary Perfumes and Beauty Products; must have estab- 
lished connection with Chemists, Beauty Parlours and Departmental 
Stores; those carrying other lines not objected to if non-competi- 
tive. Write in first instance, giving full particulars as to con- 
nection, territory covered, etc., 268/689, Office of this Paper. 

WANTED. — Live Representatives, with connections amongst 
Chemists, to carry a real selling line; 20 per cent, flat; no 
need to collect; wonderful bonus scheme. Send full details as to 
ground covered, lines carried and references in first letter to Sales 
Dept., Dog Food Products, Ltd., Great Western Estate, Loudon, 
N.W.IO. 

PQ PER WEEK Retainer plus commission after one week's trial; 
otO Representative with sound connection required to handle 
Sideline; easy selling; excellent repeats. Write, stating territory, 
connections, experience, Beaucaire Laboratories, 35 Vine Street, 
E.C.3. 

COLONIAL, INDIAN AND FOREIGN. 

EASTERN COLONY.— Qualified Assistant, young, single; good 
appearance and address; accurate Dispenser and good Sales- 
man; 4 years' engagement; passage paid out and home. Write, 
with full particulars, to Box X. 640, Willings, 133 Moorgate, 
London, E.C.2. 



SITUATIONS WANTED. 



RETAIL (HOME). 



2s. for 18 words or less ; 6d. for every additional 10 words 
or less, prepaid. (Box No., Is. extra.) 

A A A A —UNQUALIFIED Assistant (28) seeks perma- 
.Zi.»xl-»Xi-« nency; 12 years' all-round experience; keen 
Salesman, accurate Dispenser; capable of taking charge. Wright, 
31 Stovell Road, Moston, Manchester. 

A A A — QUALIFIED Branch or Senior; Salesman, Window- 
• Xi.»xl» dresser, Prescriber; West End; salary by arrange- 
ment. " Salesman," 54 Torrington Square, W.C.I. 

A A A —QUALIFIED Manager, now in West End, desires 
• XjL.xjl* change; thoroughly experienced, energetic; used 
to high-class business. " Chemist," 19 St. Philip's Road, Surbiton, 
Surrey. 

AAA -QUALIFIED Scot (21 ; 5 ft. 7 ins.) desire position 
ii.XX.xl. where opportunity given to study Optics; at 



present doing locum j free any time; excellent references. 
Office of this i'aper. 



23/13, 



A A — CAPABLE and energetic Assistant; tall; Unregistered; 
• Zi.» 30 years' experience in all capacities; used to stafi' 
control and take charge; permanency. Haigh, 175 Uxbridge Eoad, 
W.12. 



xxviii 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST SUPPLEMENT October 5, 1935 



A A — LOCUM or permanent; Senior; tall; Unregistered; 
highest references; all branches; London, provincial; 
prize ruotographies. " Mac," Wotton-under-Edge. 

A A — QUALIFIED (.26); tall; London experience; reliable; 

• Xi. free one month; London preferred. 23/8, Ollice of 
this l-aper. 

A— YOUNG Lady, Qualified, seelis situation; London or near; 

• good experience Counter, Dispensing, etc. ; 4 years 
Manageress; e.-ccellent references; free Monday, 7th. Apply 23/16, 
Office of this Paper. 

ASSISTANT; experience London and Provinces; Private and 
N.H.I. Dispensing, Counter, Photo, etc.; Home Counties or 
South Midlands preferred; Part I; tall; disengaged month's notice. 
BM/DKZH, London, W.C.I. 

ASSISTANT or Manager (26), Qualified, seelis position; locum or 
permanent; free October 6; competent Dispenser. Gordon, 
Bnnsea, Bispham, Blaclipool. 

A SSI3TANT (22), Qualified July, 1935, requires position in 
London ; one which will allow evenings free for study pre- 
ferred; 6 years' good all-round experience; Square trained; tall. 
Bailey, 3 East Road, Maidenhead. 

ASSISTANT, Unqualified; Dispensing and Counter; disengaged; 
locum or permanency. " W.," 58 Northcroft Road, West 
Ealing, W.13. 

ASSISTANT, Unqualified; experienced Dispensing, Counter; part- 
time, locum, permanency; London only; disengaged. Write 
" C. G.," 2A Yalding Road, Bermondsey, S.E.16. 

ASSISTANT (26), capable. Unqualified; Counter, Window- 
dressing, Dispensing, Photographic (Cin^); excellent refer- 
ences. Vaughan, 167 Princes Avenue, Kingsbury, N.W.9. 

ASSISTANT (22), Unqualified, free October 5th, desires imme- 
diate work, temporary or permanency; fully experienced; 
abstainer; highly recommended by present employer; any district. 
Elliott, c/o Burrows, Chemist, Beeston, Nottingham. 

BpHARM., Fh.C. (27), first-class West-End experience, seelis 
• X responsible; and progressive post. 21/6, Office of this 
Paper. 

CHEMISTS' Manager, at present managing high-class Depart- 
mental Chemists, with first-class experience in British and 
Foreign Patents and Private Dispensing and Prescribing, desires 
situation with first-class company; age 32; interview gladly given; 
salary requested £6 6s. 268/682, Office of this Paper. 

DISPENSER, Lady, Qualified, desires change; used to busy and 
high-class business. " Dispenser," 19 St. Philip's Road, 
Surbiton. 

DISPENSER, Qualified; large and varied experience; present 
position 5 years; whole or part time. H. Dralfe, 15 Wyth- 
burn Mews, Seymour Place, London, W. 



ISPENSER, with Retail experience, requires post in or near 
London; moderate salary. 23/20, Office of this Paper. 



DISPENSER, Unqualified Lady; lieen, quiclt worl<er; with good 
all-round experience, seeks post with Chemist, Doctor or 
Institution ; Exeter or district preferred. " Map," 17 Herschell 
Road, Exeter. 

EVENING DISPENSING.— Free all evenings; Chemist or Doctor; 
London district; age 29; Qualified, with HospitaLexperience ; 
now disengaged. 23/3, Office of this Paper. 

EXCEPTIONALLY experienced Unqualified Assistant (23); tall; 
permanency; 8 years high-class Dispensing Pharmacies, with 
Photographic and Toilet connections; competent Dispenser, 
Window-dresser; South Midlands preferred; excellent references; 
disengaged October 7th. 23/21, Office of this Paper. 

EXPERIENCED M.P.S., shortly disengaged; all types of busi- 
ness; personality ; locum or permanent. Chemist, 15 Lampont 
Road, Hounslow. 

EXPERIENCED Qualified Locum or Relief; £4 17s. 6d. to 
£5 10s. Harris, 7 Wellesley Avenue, Hammersmith, W.6. 

FAT W^^^' Chemist, Southwold, would like to thoroughly 
• ill. VV recommend Unqualified Assistant; trustworthy, 
competent in all branches, keen worker, and very obliging. Hilton. 
38 Canterbury Street, Chorley. 



LADY Dispenser, young, requires post; Hall qualification; Hos- 
pital experience; town or country; excellent references and 
tc^Limonials; free now. 25/ 18,, Ollice of this Paper. 

LADY, Qualified, requires post or locum; would manage; good 
general experience; free October 14th. "Pharmacist," 5 
Randolph Gardens, N.W.6. 

LADY (22), Unqualified, tall. Counter and Window-dressing, seeks 
post in South Wales; excellent references; shortly disengaged. 
21/7, Office, of this Paper. 

LOCUAI or Permanency, Qualified, tall (59), all-round experience, 
desires post; disengaged September 20. " Statim," 98 New- 
comen Road, Wellingborough. 

MANAGER, locum or permanency ; good all-round experience and 
references. 'Phone: Reliance 2741. Davies, 164 Clapham 
Koad, London, S.W.9. ■ 

MANAGER (36); married; London or Middlesex preferred; inter- 
view Thursdays or Sundays. 268/688, Office of this Paper. 

MANAGER, (26), M.P.S., requires sound permanency; West 
Riding preferred (not essential); 4 years Managersliip and 
Buying experience; accustomed to heavy Dispensing and Counter; 
keen Window-dresser. 23/31, Oflice of this Paper. 

MANAGER (40), Qualified, desires permanency; London or near; 
reliable and conscientious worker; 8 years West End; all- 
rouiiil experience; excellent references; now disengaged. Lord, 
19 Nortlicott Avenue, Wood Green, N.22. 

MANAGER (27), Qualified, single, desires change; thoroughly 
capable and dependable; 4 years' successful management; 
highest references. W. A. Weare, 72 Jeffreys Road, S.W.4. 

MEDICAL Student, some experience Dispensing, etc., desires part- 
time post, evenings, Saturdays. A. J. Mates, London Hospital 
Medical College, E.l. 

MT) D (23) seeks change; high-class business S.E. or S.W.. 
• X okJ* London; good references and experience; honest; 
industrious. 24/12, Office of this Paper. 



M.P.S. ''''' ' 



seeks post as Manager; town or 
country; good all-round experience; interview appre- 
ciated. Evelyn, 41 Knight's Hill, West Norwood, S.E.27. 



QUALIFIED Assistant (age 22) requires post as Manager or 
Senior Assistant in good-class business; thorough experience 
in provincial city. P.C.B. 178/15, Office of this Paper. 

QUALIFIED, desires post as Senior Assistant or Manager of 
Pharmacy with Optical Department, in good-class district; 
7 years' all-round experience; free one month. F. B., 60 Hillfield 
Avenue, N.8. 

QUALIFIED Locum ; experienced, West End, and every branch 
of business; competent, reliable; disengaged now. Pharma- 
cist, 18 Stanway 'Gardens, Edgware. ~' 

QUALIFIED, locum, permanency. Manager (39); excellent refer- 
ences; all-round experience; disengaged. M.P.S., 18 King's 
Road, Sedgley Park, Manchester. 

QUALIFIED, permanent or locum (56); recommended by well- 
known Pharmacists; good all-round experience. Pharmacist, 
210A The Grove, Hammersmith, W.6. 

QUALIFIED (29) desires position as Manager or Assistant; Hos- 
pital and Retail experience. Davies, 24 Grantham Road, 
Stockwell, S.W.9. 

QUALIFIED (22) desires post; London or suburbs; free next 
Wednesday; permanency preferred; sound references. 21/5, 
Office of this Paper. 

QUALIFIED; 14 years as Manager; London, Provinces and 
South Coast; married; exceptional Prescribing experience; 
Southern Counties preferred- Write 23/56, Office of this Paper. 

SCOT, Unqualified; 8 years Retail and Wholesale; expert all 
branches; reliable. Steven, 21 Nutbrook Street, Peckham, 
S.E.15. 

SCOT (28),- tall, Qualified; been in present post 3^ years as 
Manager; energetic, trustworthy; London or North preferred. 
23/41, Office of this Paper. 



I 



October 5, 1935 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST SUPPLEMENT 



xxix 



YOU CAN USE YOUR SPARE TIME 

to Start a Mail Order Business that quickly brings you a full time 
income. Follow the lead of others who are averaging £12 per week 
net profits. Get away from a drudging routine job — join the big- 
money class. No previous experience necessary. Few pounds capital 
only needed. No samples or outfits to buy ; no rent, rates or can- 
vassing. New method makes success certain. Write today for FREE 
BOOKLET to BUSINESS SERVICE INSTITUTE, (Dept. 209c), 
6 Carmelite Street, London, E.C.4. 



SCOTSMAN (21), Qualified July, 1935, wishes situation in South; 
been doing locum; good appearance. Apply 22/6, Office of 
this Paper. 

SMART Young Lady as Dispenser to Doctor, Hospital or Chemist; 
5 years' experience; Unqualified; good references; Yorkshire 
district. 20/1, OflTice of this Paper. 

UNQUALIFIED (bachelor); long experience sole control; whole-, 
part-time, locum, any capacity. Eeely, 259 Underhill Road, 
East Dulwich, S.E.22. 

UNQUALIFIED (40; married); 25 years Pharmacy; 13 years 
last post; used Family and Dispensing business; urgently 
seeks permanency; free now. " Eyms," Sunnymount, Seymore 
Road, Lee-on-Solent, Hants. 

UNQUALIFIED Lady (23), good appearance and Salesmanship, 
desires position Counter, Brighton or London. Shrubsole, 
52 Portland Avenue, Hove. 

YOUNG Man (23), Unqualified, requires permanency in or near 
London; good Salesman and Window-dresser; no N.H.I. Dis- 
pensing. J. Poole, Drug Stores, King Street, Winnersh, Berks. 

OAS. — Experienced, capable and reliable Assistant seeks part- 
OU time; any capacity; pick your own hours; within reason- 
able distance Greenwich or Woolwich. " A. C. R.," 34 Sundorne 
Road, Charlton, S.E.7. 

WHOLESALE. 

A CAPABLE, responsible, well-known Gentleman (50) desires re- 
engagement to Represent firm of indisputable integrity and 
principles; Professional and /or Trade Propaganda; Sales; Hants 
and West; own car; proper credentials. "Stability," c/o General 
Gordon Hotel, Weymouth. 

ALIVE Representative, with strongly established connection 
amongst Chemists, Hairdressers and Stores, whole of London, 
is open to consider well-known house of repute; can prove ability 
by actual records; own car. Particulars to Keen, 267/676, Office 
of this Paper. 

A REPRESENTATIVE, Public School, own car, excellent con- 
nection with Hospitals, Medical Institutions, Wholesale 
Chemists, etc., London and Southern England, seeks similar ap- 
pointment; any area considered; highest references., 23/33, Office 
of this Paper. 

ADVERTISER seeks re-engagement; thorough knowledge all 
branches Wholesale Drug Trade; either inside post or repre- 
senting; own car. " F. P.," 26 Culmington Road, West Eahng, 
W.13. 'Phone: Ealing 5057-; 

COMPOUNDER, highly experienced, reqiiires post, preference 
London or near; keen worker, temperate, obliging, conscien- 
tious; also good accountant; excellent references. 22/20, Office of 
this Paper. 

EXPERIENCED Manager, thorough knowledge Retail, desires 
post as Representative, or Medical Propaganda: healthy; 
active; excellent references; moderate salary. 23/7, Office of this 
Paper. 

EXPERIENCED, reliable Representative, with sound connection 
in Scotland, Medical, Dental, Veterinary, Hospitals; highest 
credentials as Salesman and Physician's Detailist; disengaged at 
present. " Nemo," 26 Shandwick Place, Edinburgh. 

EXPERIENCED Traveller with fir.st-class connection London, 
Provmces and South Coast seeks re-engagement; own car- 
knowledge of RetaiL P.C.B. 177/15, Office of this Paper. 

<n;ENTLEMAN (35 ; "married) desires position. Administrative or 
V/ otherwise, where 14 years' experience Medical Representa- 
tipn would be of advantage ; experience covers Slirgical Instruments, 
Ures^Mngs and Sundries, and Medical Propaganda, 21/5, Office of 
this Paper. 

pART I, Revising, would accept progressive post as Firm's Repre- 
-i- sentative or otherwise; excellent references; used to high- 
cfass pharmacy, with Perfumery and Dispensing; interview and 
own car if necessary. 21/2, Office of this Paper!. 

•pEPRESENTATIVE, covering South London, seeks additional 
Han ri!Z-ff'^ P'"'* «"<Penses and commission; good connec- 

tion Chemists and Stores. 24/10, Office of this Paper. 



^1 CAE? ir\ I IT your Oid or Damaged 

V/lnCMn %J\J i Stock of Photo Goods. 

Why keep them any longer? Turn them into CASH. 
I filUF RPQT PRIPFQ for Old Films (damaged, fogged 
t UUL DLOl rniUtO or expired dates); Packet 
Papers. Cards (any sizes). Old Photo Goods or Cameras. 
Bromide Papers. Plates (all sizes, all makes). Send any 
goods in the photo line. I buy all, good or bad. Cash per 
return. A good price for all Cameras. Send them along. 

S. E. HACKETT, 23 July Road, Liverpool 



COLONIAL, INDIAN AND FOREIGN. 

BRITISHER (now visiting London), 30 years' residence Egypt, 
lluent French and Arabic, 7 years' experience Medical Pro- 
pagandist, Egypt, Cyprus, Palestine, Syria and Irak, seeks Agencies, 
or would Travel for firm or group of firms in these countries; 
excellent references. P.C.B. 178/4, Office of this Paper. 



FOR SALE. 

(Articles to the value of £5-£50.) 

CASH Register; black and chromium finish; "National" make; 
prints and adds all takings; must sell. Write R. Spenser, 88 
-Madeira Avenue, Bromley, Kent. 

GOLD labelled Shop Rounds, labelled Nests of Drawers, Mahogany 
Counter, 39 ft. (in four sections), and sundry Chemist's 
utensils, at 37/ 38 Merchant Street, Pontlottyn ; inspection by 
appointment invited. Apply Mr. Trevor Thomas, Solicitor, Victoria 
Street, Merthyr Tydfil. 

MORRIS-OXFORD Saloon, 1928, 13.9 h.p.; insured to June, 
1936; owner gone abroad; will accept £10. Apply 45 Belve 
dere Road, S.E.I. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



CASH REGISTERS, National, all kinds; Total Adders, Ticket 
Issuers, Printers, etc.; Box Cash Tills, fully guaranteed; no 
reasonable offer refused; all reliable makes bought, sold, ex- 
changed, repaired; easy terms. Write or call, Amalgamated Busi- 
ness Machines, Ltd., 78 Long Lane, Smitlifleld, E.C.I ('Phone 
National 0674). Satisfaction guaranteed. D. Deiches, Managing 
Director. 

CHEMISTS' FITTINGS.— We hold an immense stock of Drug 
Fittings, Dispensing Screens, Glass-fronted Counters, Per- 
fumery Cases, Nests of Drawers, Wall Cases, Silent Salesmen, 
Upright and Flat Counter Ca.ses, Plate Glass Counters, Cash Tills, 
Display Stands and Glass Shelves, etc., at competitive prices. 
F. MAUND & K. BERG (SHOWCASES), LTD., Shop Fitters and 
Shop Front Builders, 175/9 Old Street, London, E.C.I. 

MEDICAL Addresses for Disposal; complete installation, includ- 
ing Electric Addressing Machine, Cabinets and 41,000 Sten- 
cils, being up-to-date Medical List for U.K. and I.F.S. 268/681, 
Office of this Paper. 

SURPLUS Stock of Loofahs (after season); about 4,500 pieces; 
6 doz. each 12/14 in. and 16/18 in. sent to any Chemist 
in England, Scotland or Wales on receipt of money order or cheque 
for 253. Thos. Swales, St. Stephen's Road, Leeds, 9. 

1 A FT. Drug Fitting; 6 ft. Wall Case; 12 ft. Glass-fronted 
iU Counter, nests of Coimter Drawers; 6 ft. Dispensing Screen 
and Counter; Counter Case; Personal Weighing Machine; Chair; 
all reconditioned and polished, PHILIP JOSEPHS & SONS, LTD,, 
90/92 St, John Street, Clerkenwell, E,C,1, Telephone: Clerken- 
well 2191, " Pharmacy fitters for over a century." 

PO— COMPLETE CHEMIST FITTINGS at any price you wish to 
X'T pay. We have erected in our showrooms a Complete Chemist's 
Shop with Metal Shop Front, Window Backs, Correct Window 
Lighting, Signs and Modern Interior Fittings, Apply for Lists, 
D, MATTHEWS & SON, LTD,, " The Liverpool Shop Fitters," 
"14 and 16 Manchester Street, Liverpool, Est, 1848, 

EXCHANGE COLUMN. 



WANTED. 

CASH Register wanted; "National" preferred; must be sound. 
Write details P,C,B, 178/3, Office of this Paper. 

OPTICAL Trial Case. State contents, lowest price, full particu- 
lars to 23/15, Office of this Paper. 



s 



MALL Tincture Press; to hold about i gallon of marc; state 
price, condition, etc. 268/580, Office of this Paper. 



XXX 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST SUPPLEMENT 



October 5, 1935 




'f Are you near the end of your Financial Year ? 



IF SO, DO NOT FORGET THE 

a & D. 

STOCK-TAKING PAD 

(THIRD EDITION) 

THE GREATEST TIME-SAVER IN THE TRADE 



This edition differs from the first two editions mainly in the more convenient 
grouping of classes of goods in which grouping was found to be practicable : 
veterinary medicines, photographic goods and packed preparations are examples. 
In addition, the number of blank pages has been increased, so that there may be 
ample space for entering stock not readily seen to faU under any of the printed 
headings. Used in conjunction with the C. & D. Retail Price List it enables the . 
chemist to do his own stocktaking quickly, cheaply and efficiently. Contains 

54 sheets in pad form. 

Price 2/6^ post free 

J. T. P. (23/14) writes : — " Please send me a pad of the 
C. & D. Stock-taking Sheets, for which I enclose 
2/6. I found it a great time-saver last year." 

S. P. (16/25) says : — " I'he C. & D. Stock-taking Pad is the 
best thing I have seen yet. It is useful also to 
form the original stock-list of a new shop, saves 
many hours' work and prevents omissions. I shall 
always use it in my pharmacies." 

W. J. B. (21/18) writes : — " We had one of your Stock- 
taking Pads last year and found it very convenient, 
as it saves a great deal of trouble." 

THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

'Publications Department 
28 ESSEX STREET - - - LONDON, W.C.2 

BRANCH OFFICES 

4 CANNON STREET. MANCHESTER (tEL. : BUACKFRIARS 30S2) 54 FOSTER'S BUILDINGS. HIGH STREET. SHEFFIELD (XEL. : 22458) 

19 WATERLOO STREET. GLASGOW (tEL. : CENTRAL 2329) I5S AVENUE DE WAGRAM, PARIS, XVII^ (tEL. : ETOILB t9-79) 
52 CARRIN6TON STREET. SYDNEY. N.S.W. 372 FLINDERS LANE, MELBOURNE. AUSTRALIA 

S5a SHORTLAND STREET. AUCKLAND, N.Z. PLANTAGE-FRANSCHELAAN >2, AMSTERDAM 



Printed in Great Britain for the Proprietors by Eyre and Spottiswoode Limited, His Majesty's Printers, East Harding Street, London, E.C.4, and 
Published by the Proprietors, MOB-GAN BROTHERS (Publishers), Limited, at 28 Essex Street, Strand, London, W.O.2.— Oc«. 5, 1935. [68/30] 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



iii 



MONSANTO 





An outstanding MONSANTO product combining greatest convenience in 
form and packing with purity, whiteness, uniformity and ready solubility 0 
MONSANTO PHTHALIC ANHYDRIDE FLAKES are compact, clean and flow 
freely from the container with a minimum of dusting ^ They are packed in 
new 75-lb. paper sacks, giving great convenience in handling, which, together 
with the smaller storage space required, will effect a definite saving in cost to 
the user % In short, all the desirable characteristics you are looking for are 
combined in British-Made MONSANTO PHTHALIC ANHYDRIDE # May we 
submit a sample and quote you ? 



MONSANTO 

VICTORIA STATION 
Works : Ruabon, North Wales, 
and Sunderlar^d 

Cariada : 



CHEMICALS LIMITED, 

HOUSE, VICTORIA STREET, LONDON, S.W.I 

Telephone : Northern Sales Office : K/ng's House, 

VICTORIA 1535 King Street West, Manchester 

Telephone : Blackfriars 3043 
378 sr. PAUL STREET WEST, MONTREAL 



IV 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



October 5, 1935 



NEW SHOW MATERIAL 
NEW STREAMER 



FOR 



ALL FOURS 
CUBES 

The winter cough medicine which 
cannot be sold by Grocers, 
Sweetshops, etc. 

7 lbs. a. V4 

Supplied in bulk with plentiful 
show material, envelopes for 
packing all. 

Retail at 2d. an oz., thus showing 
100% profit on cost or more 
when buying on best terms. 
Contracts may be booked as 
follows : — 



1 4 lbs. 
28 lbs. 
56 lbs. 
1 1 2 lbs. 



1/3 
1/2 
1/1 
1/- 



Samples already packed for 
free distribution to your 
customers are available on 
request. 



I 



Ph 

Jielu 
Jlead 

S'tof. 

( 





ARTHUR H.COX & CO. 



LTD. 



Printed in Great Britain for tlie Proprietors bv Eyre anb Spottiswoode Limited, His Majesty's Printers, East Harding Street, London, E.C.4, and 
Published by tlie Proprietors, MORGAN" BROTHERS (Publisliers), Limited, at 28 Essex Street, Strand, London, W.C.2.— Oc«. 5, 1935. \\\\ 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 




ISSUED QUARTERLY FOURTEENTH YEAR OF PUBLICATION 



THE SEIXING PRICES in this List are based on the given cost and 
calculated for the quantities specified, the total oncost for that turn- 
over being then added, together with the net profit, to the nearest 
figure. In case of fractions the prices are rounded up or down 
to the most suitable figure. As in arriving at the prices allowance 
has been made for variations in specific gravity, liquids should be 
sold by fluid measure and solids by weight. 

INTERMEDIATE QUANTITIES should be calculated on the 
lower figure until midway is passed, then on the higher figure. The 
range of the quantities quoted in the List may be increased as 
follows : For one pint add one-fourth to the 16 oz. selling price. 
The gallon price for oils is obtained by dividing the cwt. price 
by 6; for 7-lb. sales multiply the lb. cost by 10; for 14-lb. by 20; 
and for 28-lI>. by 38. For intermediate drachm prices divide 
1-oz. quotations by 7 and multiply by the number of drachms 
required. To obtain the grain prices divide the drachm selling 
price by 50. 

ADJUSTING PRICES.— While standard wholesale prices are used 
as the starting point for calculating the retail prices, it may be desired 
to adjust the selling price for variations in cost. This 
may be effected by the following simplified method : To 
obtain the lb. selling price add half to the cost price 
(yielding 33 i per cent, on return); for the 4-oz. 
selling price divide the lb. cost by 10 and multiply 
by 4 (yielding 37.3 per cent.); for the l-oz. selling 
price divide the lb. cost by 9 (yielding 43.75 per 
cent.). This method also applies to lozenges and 
pastilles which remain at a firm cost price. 
DISPENSING CHARGES.— The two systems given 
(p. 2) are based on a special investigation and should 
be used for all dispensing other than contract work. 
When the Rapid Method is employed the Edinburgh 
private mark MELBORACIS should be used. In 
the case of a prescription containing one or more 
ingredients of an expensive nature the Costing Method 
is used and the mark " C. & D." only ought then 
to be indicated beneath the chemist's stamp. 
MONTHLY CHANGES.— Important changes in 
prices occurring between the quarterly issues of this 
Ust are notified in The Chemist and Druggist. 
Subscribers are recommended to carry out these 
alterations in ink as they are published, and so keep 
the quarterly List up to date. 

ABBREVIATIONS.— The references to standards 
or formulas in the List are : B.P. (British Pharma- 
copoeia); U.S.P. (United States Pharmacopoeia); 
B.P.C. (British Pharmaceutical Codex); M.O.H. 
(Ministry of Health); P.L.F. (Price Ust 
Formulary) ; N.I.F. (National Insurance Formulary). 



" Ek F" denotes that 



"C. & D." 
DRUG INDEX 



Drugs (1913=.100) 




1934 


1935 


Jan. 


144.3 


144-3 


Feb. 


144.4 


144-4 


Mar. 


143.5 


144-6 


April 


143.6 


144-6 


May 


143.6 


144-7 


June 


143.5 


144-7 


July 


143.5 


145 0 


Aug. 


141.2 


144' 6 


Sept. 


140.6 


146-0 


Oct. 


140.3 




Nov. 


140.2 




Dec. 


140.2 




Dressings (1913= 100) 




1934 


1935 


Jan. 


136.5 


136-3 


Feb. 


136.5 


136-3 


Mar.. 


136.0 


136-2 


April 


136.0 


136-2 


May 


136.0 


136 2 


June 


138.0 


136 2 


July 


136.0 


136 2 


Aug. 


136.0 


136-2 


Sept. 


136.3 


136-2 


Oct. 


136.3 




Nov. 


136.3 




Dec. 


136.3 





SALE RESTRICTIONS.— The small capital letters on the left-hand 
side of the retail price indicate the restrictions on the sale in Great 
Britain, and generally in Ireland, of the particular drug or chemical. 
The letters are used in the same sense as in The Chemist and Druggist 
Diary, 1935 (where full information of the restrictions is given), and the 
C. & D. series of Poisons Cards, the indications being as follows : — 

A. Arsenic Act, 1851. 

B. Part I of the Schedule of the Poisons and Pharmacy Act, 
1908, and Section 17 of the Pharmacy Act, 1868; Section 2 of the 
Sale of Poisons (Ireland) Act, 1870, and Part I of the Fourth 
Schedule of the Pharmacy and Poisons Act (Ireland), 1925. 

C. Part II of the Schedule of the Poisons and Pharmacy Act, 
1908, and Section 17 of the Pharmacy Act, 1868; Section 2 of the 
Sale of Poisons (Ireland) Act, 1870, and Part II of the Fourth 
Schedule of the Pharmacy and Poisons Act (Ireland), 1925. 

D. Agricultural and horticultural poisons according to Section 2 
of' the Poisons and Pharmacy Act, 1 908. 

E. Poisonous substances according to Section 5 of the Poisons 
and Pharmacy Act, 1908. 

F. Dangerous Drugs Acts, 1920 to 1932 
the preparation is exempted by Regulation. 

PRICE LIST FORMULARY ("P.L.F.")-For the 
many unofficial preparations in active sale for which no 
standard formulas exist a special formulary has been 
compiled from " Pharmaceutical Formulas," " Veterin- 
ary Counter Practice " and other C. & D. publications. 
The cost and retail prices are given in this List 
and alterations made each month where changes in cost 
of ingredients make this necessary. The Price List 
Formulary is published at 2s. 6d. post free. 

DRUG INDEX.— This C. & D. feature furnishes a 
comparative figure of the cost of drugs and appliances 
in 1913 and the present time. It is an important factor 
in accounting for the differences in retail charges 
now and before the war, and in the valuation of 
retail businesses. 

STOCKTAKING SHEETS.-These sheets are used 
in conjunction with this List, in the annual stock- 
taking of drugs and chemicals, and form the simplest 
and quickest system of stock-taking for the drug-trade. 
The sheets, fastened into a pad, consist of the names 
of the articles printed on ruled paper in the same order 
as these occur in the List, which much facilitates the 
subsequent stage of pricing the stock from the cost 
figures. The sheets are sold in pads (2*. 6d. post free) 
wi^h blank pages at the end. 



Published as a Supplement to The ChEMIST AND 
Druggist, at 28 Essex Street, Strand, London, W.C.2. 



2 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



October 5, 1935 



CONTENTS 



DRUGS AND CHEMICALS 

AMPOULES . _ - - 

CAPSULES - - 

TABLETS 

SURGICAL DRESSINGS AND 
APPLIANCES - - - - 

SEROLOGICAL PRODUCTS 

VACCINES AND TUBERCULINS - 



PAGE 

3 
27 
27 
28 

30 
31 
32 



DISPENSED MEDICINES 

There are two systems of charging for medicines dispensed on pre- 
scription, as follows : — 

I. flAPID METHOD. — ^The cost represents a definite proportion of 
the charge and refers to ordinary drugs and chemicals with infusions or 
decoctions. Tinctures, syrups, extracts, if prescribed in any quantity, 
require the price adjusting by the list according to Method 2. The prices 
quoted are exclusive of containers. (See below.) 

Mixtures of simple medicaments : — 



Size 


Dose 3j' 


Dose 3ij- 


Dose 3iv. 


Dose §j. 




.. d. 


». d. 


s. d. 


s. d. 


Si 


1 0 


0 10 


0 9 


0 8 


gii 


1 6 


1 2 


1 0 


0 10 


Sjii 




1 6 


1 3 


1 0 


Siv 




1 10 


1 S 


1 2 


5vj 






2 0 


1 6 


Sviii 






2 6 


1 10 







s. 


d. 






1 


6 




12 


1 


6 




12 


2 


6 


Ointments, mixed 


I oz.. Is. 3d.; 2oz. 


1 


6 


Suppositories, bougies, pessaries 


12 


2 


0 






1 


0 






2 


6 


An extra fee of 6d. per prescription is made 


for night attendance. 







When this method of pricing is employed, the first dispenser of the 
prescriptions should mark the price charged by private mark. The Edin- 
burgh private mark 



M 
1 



which has been in use for many years, should be adopted. 

Larger quantities, or those containing appreciable amounts of tinctures, 
etc, should be priced by Method 2. 



2. COSTING METHOD.— This method is calculated on the averag 
time taken for the various operations involved in dispensing, and is basei 
on the recommendations in 1915 of the Departmental Committee on th 
National Insurance Act Drug Tariff and the results obtained by numerou 
correspondents. The three components of the price of a prescription 
be added together are as follows r— 

A. The selling prices in this list are calculated upon costing principle 
and form a correct basis for obtaining the cost of the ingredients of a prescrif 
tion. For finding the price of drachm quantities other than those quoted 
the list, the rule that should be adopted is to divide the ounce quantity b 
seven and multiply the figures obtained by the number of drachms requirw 

B. Prices of containers are given in the list. (See below.) 

C. Special " oncost " included in the terms " time " and " labour 
perform the work, and the special establishment charges of the dispei 
sary above and beyond that already included in the distribution " oncost 

Modem medical treatment sometimes requires forms of medicatic 
needing long periods of time in their preparation. No standard fee a 
be laid down since time, the guiding factor, is unknown until the prescriptic 
IS completed. A basic figure covering time with its essential oncost ai 
actual labour may be calculated on a rate of 60d. per hour or portions there 
in making up the final professional charge. 

The accountant's figures for " oncost " are as follows : — 

s. 

Uncompounded medicines of whatever nature 0 

Mixtures, lotions, liniments, drops, rectal injections . • . . 0 

Emulsions 0 

Pills cind weighed powders doz. 0 

Ointments, confections, etc .. 0 

Blisters 0 

Cachets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . doz. 

Capsules, hard (cachet fitting) doz. 

Bougies, suppositories, pessaries doz. 

Plasters . . 

Granules, pastilles, lozenges, soft capsules . . . . doz. 

Silvering, veimishing, and otherwise coating pills . . doz. 3d. ex| 

Ampoules (filling and sterilising) doz. 3 

Solutions and oils in bulk (sterilising) . . . . to 500 mils. 

Oculenta (sterilised) to 1 oz. 

Powders, mixed, in bulk to 4 oz. 

Injections and hypodermic sterilising . . . . to 1 oz. 
injections, intravenous and diagnostic sterilising .. to 100 mils. 
Hire of appliances . . . . . . . • . . per week 

Special registration fee of medicaments . . , 0 

per dose 2 
per 6 doses 3 

As these charges cover average time, the oncost for larger quantities 
be calculated according to the length of time required on the above 

When the Costing Method is used, mark " C. & D." under the m| 
stamp on the prescription. 



Tuberculin and protein dilutions 



{ 



Retail charge 



CONTAINERS 



Medicine and Poison Bottles 





SeU 




SeU 






». d. 




5. d. 




2 dr., 4 dr., 1 oz. 


0 2 


10 oz. 


..0 3 


20 ca. 


2 oz., 3 oz. 


0 2 


12 oz. 


..0 3 


32 oz. 


4 oz. 


0 2 


16 oz. 


..0 4 


40 oz. 


6 oz., 8 oz. 


0 2 









Iodine bottles add price of rubber stopper (3d.) to poison bottles.1 



Ointment Pots 

Sell 
s. d. 

1 dr.,2dr., ioz. 0 6 
1 oz.. lioz. .. 0 7 

2oz 0 8 

3 oz 0 10 

4oz .. .. Oil 



Stoppered Bottles 
Sell 
s. d. 

1 oz. ..0 7 



2 oz. 
4 oz. 
6 oz. 
8 oz. 



0 8 
0 9 
0 10 
0 11 



Powder Bottles 1 



1 o?,, 1 oz. 

2 oz. . . 
4 oz. .. 
6 oz. . . 



k 
I, „ 

Mi 



f 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



3 



Cost 



lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 



lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
gal. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
gal. 
tub« 
50 

lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
gr. 
oz. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
oz. 
cwt. 

lb. 

oz. 
gal. 
gal. 
doz. 
lb. 
oz. 

lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

oz. 
oz. 
oz. 
oz. 

lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

oz. 
oz. 

lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

oz. 

lb. 



Drugs and 
Chemicals 



" A.C.E." anaesthetic . . C 
Absinthium 

Acaciae gummi alb. elect. 

Acaciae gummi alb. parv. opt. . . 

Acacia: gummi alb. parv. sec. . . 

Acaciffi gummi alb. pulv. opt. . . 

Acaciae gummi alb. pulv. sec. . . 

Acaciae gummi var. opt. 

Acetamidosalol . . 

Acetanilidum . . ; . 

Acetannin 

Acetonum 

Acetonum coml. 

Acetuna aromaticum P.L.F. 

Acet. arom. P.L.F. (synth. ol.) 

Acet. cantharidini . . C 

Acet. cantharidis . . C 

Acet. colchid . . . . C 

Acet. destillatum album 

Acet. fuscum 

Acet. fuscum (Beaufoy) 

Acet. ipecacuanhas . . C 

Acet. odoratum B.P.C. 

Acet. rubi ideei . . 

Acet. scillae 

Acet. vini Gallici 

Acidol tablets 

Acidol pepsin (50 tabs.) 

Acida 
Acidum aceticum 
Acid, aceticum dilutum 
Acid, aceticum glaciale 
Acid, acetylsalicylicum . . 
Acid, ascorbic synth. . . 
Acid, benzoicum nat. . . 
Acid, benzoicum synth. 
Acid, boricum cryst. 
Acid, borici pulv. subtil. 
Acid, borici pulv. pkd. 
Acid, borici coml. pulvis 
Acid, borici coml. pulvis 
Acid, camphoricum 
Acid, carbolicum "miscible" C 
Acid, carbolicum " straw " C 
Acid', carbolicum (disinf.) pkd. 
Acid, carbol. (disinf. powder) . . 
Acid, cinnamicum 
Acid, citricum . . 
Acid, citrici pulvis 
Acid, cresylicum pur. (vap.) C 
Acid, formicum 50% . . 
Acid, gallicum . . 
Acid, glycerophosphoric. 20% . . 
Acid, hippuricum - 
Acid, hydriodicum dilutum 
Acid, hydrobrom. cone. 30% . . 
Acid, hydrobrom. dilutum 
Acid, hydrochloricum . . £ 
Acid, hydrochloricum dilutum 
Acid, hydrochloricum coml. E 
Acid, hydrocyan. (Scheele) B 
Acid, hydrocyan. dilutum B 
Acid, hydrofluor. coml. (by wt.) 
Acid, hydrofluoric, dil. B.P.C. 
Acid, hypophosphorosum dil, 
Acid, lacticum . . 
Acid, lacticum dilutum 
Acid, mandelic . . 



Selling Price 



4 10 
3 9 



2 6 
2 2 



1 0 

gal. 



2 4 
1 2 

pint 
per 
each 

1 0 
0 9 



0 11 

1 2 

71b. 
1 0 

pint 

1 0 
g viij, 
0 9 

2 7 
2 9 

2 9 



1 7 
1 0 



2 6 
1 8 



2 8 



4oz. 
.. d. 



2 6 

0 6 
2 2 

1 11 



0 9 
0 8 



1 
4 
9 
4 
6 
0 3 
0 11 
5 6 
0 10 

0 5 

1 '3 

tube 

5 6 



0 4 

0 5 

0 7 

3 5 

0 4 

0 8 

0 4 

1 2 



0 9 

0 10 

1 2 
0 11 



0 10 

0 6 

1 2 

0 8 



I oz. 

d. 



0 2 
0, 7 



0 
0 
0 

pint 

0 1 

0 4 

1 6 
0 3 
0 2 

0 2 

1 6 



I dr 



0 li 
0 1 

0 3 
0 6 

grain 
4 5 



0 li 
4 1 

0 2 



4 
3 
3 
4 
4 
2 

10 
3 
1 
7 
3 
2 
2 
2 
2 
0 
3 
2 
7 

11 
3 
8 



0 7 
0 2 
0 6 



0 7 



0 1 

0 9 

0 2 



0 7 



0 1 

0 3 

0 4 

0 9 

0 2 



0 2 
0 2 



0 1 

0 2 

0 1 

0 8 



Cost 



12 
17 

8 
12 

8 
12 
78 
21 
13 
20 

8 
14 
11 

8 
32 
30 
14 
14 

9 
11 

8 

7.5 



26 
7 

20 
21 
20 
21 
21 

21 
32 
9 
60 
113 
34 
19 
14 
17 
15 
9 
41 
27 
39 
24 
8 
72 
7 
31 
42 
96 
102 
51 
48 
21 
50 
90 
7 
8 
12 
262 
108 
274 
168 
315 
128 



lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
oz. 

lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

oz. 
oz. 

lb. 

oz. 

lb. 

oz. 

lb. 

oz. 

lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

oz. 

lb. 
lb. 

oz. 

lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

oz. 
oz. 

lb. 
lb. 

gr- 
dr. 
oz. 
25 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

gr- 
oz. 
oz. 

lb. 
lb. 

oz. 

lb. 

oz. 
ea. 
ea. 
lb. 
lb. 
oz. 
50 
lb. 
oz. 
oz. 
oz. 
oz. 
oz. 

pt. 
pt 
pt. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 



Ac— AI 

Acida — (cont.) 



Acid, molybdicum 
Acid, nitricum . . 
Acid, nitricum dilutum 
Acid, nitricum coml. . . 
Acid, nitro-hydrochlor. dil. 

Acid, oleicum 

Acid, osmic. I per cent. sol. . 
Acid, oxalicum recryst. 
Acid, oxalicum coml. . . > 
Acid, phosphoricum B.P. 
Acid, phosphoricum dilutum . 
Acid, pyroga'licum sublim. 
Acid, pyrogallicum cryst. 
Acid, pyrolignosum 
Acid, salicylicum nat. . . 
Acid, salicylici pulvis . . 
Acid, salicylsulphonicum 
Acid, stearicum coml. . . 
Acid, sulphanilic. recryst 
Acid, sulphuricum 
Acid, sulphuricum dilutum 
Acid, sulphuricum coml. 
.Acid, sulphuricum aromaticum 
Add. sulphurosum 
Acid, sulphuros. (in spirit) 
Acid, tannicum . . 
Acid, tartancum cryst. mag. 
Acid, tartaricum cryst. parv. 
Add. tartarici pulvis ~, . . 
Add. trichloraceticum . . 
Acid, valerianicum 



Aconitum . . . . B 
Aconiti rad. pulv. . . B 
Aconitina . . . . fi 

Acriflavinum 

Adalin 

Adalin tablets gr. 5 
Adeps bmzoatus 
Adeps praeparatus 

Adeps lanae 

Adeps lanae hydrosu* . . 
Adrenalinum 

Adrenalin.chIor.sol. 1 - 1 ,000(P.D.) 
Adrephine (P.D.) 
i^ther anaesthet. by wgt., 
Ethet methylicus 0.730 

/Ether aceticus 

./Ether chloricus 
iEther ozonicus . . . . 
iEthylis chloride (30 c.c.) 
yEthylis chloride (50 c.c.) 
Agar (shredded) . . 

Agar pulvis 

Agotan . . . . . . B 

Agotan tablets . . . , B 
Agropyrum Ang. 

Airol 

Albargin 

Albumen (egg) pulv. . . 
Albumin, (blood) pulv. 
Albumin, tannic. 
Alcohol 90% sine rebate 
Alcohol 90% a rebate 
Alcohol 95% s. r. 
Alcohol dehydrat. 
Alcohol abs. (sine rebate) 
Alcohol ammon. fort. B.P.C. 



Selling Pric* 



16 oz. 
». d. 



3 2 

2 3 

1 6 

1 8 

1 0 

1 0 

1 9 

2 6 
1 9 
1 0 



2 6 
2 7 
2 6 



per 
per 

doz. 
2 5 



per 



5 0 
3 0 



ea. 
ea. 



24 0 
11 0 



4oz. 
1. d. 



t. d. 



I dr. 
>. i. 



0 11 
0 5 
0 8 
0 5 
0 6 

0 10 

0 7 

1 4 
0 5 



2 
0 
0 
0 
0 
0 
11 
0 
0 
0 
0 
2 
1 



0 4 

1 1 

0 7 

0 lOi 

0 5 

0 6 

0 4 

1 0 

0 9 

0 9 

0 9 



1 1 

1 2 
sr. 
gr- 

2 6 
0 9 
0 7 
0 8 
0 7 

gr- 



1 5 

1 0 

2 6 

4 0 

5 3 

3 5 
3 8 

1 6 
0 10 



7 0 

3 3 

6 0 

10 3 



0 4 



0 4 

0 4 

1 6 

0 2 



0 4 

1 2 

0 9 

1 1 



1 0 
1 0 



0 11 

0 8 

1 9 
1 9 



4 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



October 5, 1935 



Cost 



i. 


per 


42 


lb. 


33 


lb. 


36 


pt. 


360 


lb. 


24 


oz. 


42 


dr. 


40 


lb. 


18 


lb. 


162 


100 


55 


oz. 


39 


lb. 


39 


lb. 


15 


lb. 


20 


lb. 


66 


lb. 


13 


oz. 


28 


gm. 


60 


lb. 


18 


lb. 


24 


lb. 


30 


lb. 


13 


lb; 


15 


lb. 


4 


lb. 


252 


cwt. 


4.5 


lb. 


276 


cwt. 


21 


lb. 


9 


lb. 


17 


lb. 


18 


lb. 


13 


lb. 


6 


oz. 


8 


oz. 


45 


lb. 


42 


lb. 


12 




21 


lb." 


9 


lb. 


16 


oz. 


14 


oz. 


26 


oz. 


42 


oz. 


38 


oz. 


51 


lb. 


45 


lb. 


4 


oz. 


30 


oz. 


78 


lb. 


18 


lb. 


36 


lb. 


36 


lb. 


15 


lb. 


15 


lb. 


9 


lb. 


8 


lb. 


11 


lb. 


11.5 


lb. 


15 


lb. 


11 


lb. 


11 


lb. 


7 


oz. 


60 


lb. 


36 


02, 


12 


lb. 


13 


oz. 


18 


oz. 



Al — Am 



Alcohol amylicum 
Alcohol amylicum coml. 
Alcohol isopropylicum . . 
Alcohol methylicum pur. 
Aldehydum alcoh. 20% 
Allantoinum 

All Fours P.L.F 

Allium sativum . . 

Allonal tablets . . . . B 

Ailosan . . 

Aloe Berbadensis 

Aloe Barbadensis pulvis opt. . . 

Aloe Capensis . . 

Aloe Capensis pulvis . . 

Aloe Socot. pulvis 

Aloinum . . 

Alopon (A. & H.) . . B,F 
Altha^e (lores 
Althssffi folia 
Althaeae rad. decort. 
Althseee rad. dec. pulvis 
Alumen . . 

Alumen pulv. . . . . . . 

Alumen coml. . . ., ~ .. 

Alumen coml. . . 

Alumen coml. pulv. 

Alumen comL pulv. 

Alumen chromicum recryst. . . 

Alumen chromicum coml. 

Alumen exsiccatum 

Alumen exsiccatum pulv. 

Alumen rupel . . 

Aluminii acetas . . 

Aluminii aceto-tartras . . 

Aluminii chloridum (hydrated) 

Aluminii hydroxidum . . 

Aluminii salicylas 

Aluminii sulphas 

Aluminii sulphas coml. 

Aluminii tannas 

Amidol . . 

Amidopyrina 

AmidopyrinsE camphorat. 

Amidopyrinae salicylas . . 

Ammoniaci pulvis 

Ammoniacum opt. (gtt.) 

Axomonium 
Ammon. acetas pur. 
Ammon. benzoas nat. . . 
Ammon. benzoas synth. 
Ammon. bicarb. 
Ammon. bichromas cryst. 
Ammon. bromidum 
Ammon. carb. resub. . . 
Ammon. carb. resub. pulv. 

Ammon. carb. coml 

Ammon. carb coml. (qty.) 
Ammon. carb. coml. pulv. 
Ammon. carb. coml. pulv. (qly.) 
Ammon. chloridum pur. 
Ammon. chloridum coml. 
Ammon. chloridum " lumps '. . 
Ammon. citras . . 
Ammon. formas 
Ammon. hippuras 
Ammon. hydrosulph. sol. 
Ammon. hypophosphis 
Ammon. iodidiim . . 



Selling Price 


Cost 


16 oz. 


4 oz. 


1 oz. 


1 dr. 






J. d. 


s. d. 


>. d. 


<. </. 


d. 


per 


3 i 


1 R 




n 1 


4o 


IL 

lb. 


•k 0 


1 9 


n A 

U 4 




1 Q 

lo 


IL 

lb. 


A n 


1 1 


n A 

U 4 




V 


IL 

lb. 




11 a 


Q n 


A c 
U b 


07 
11 


IL 

lb. 






^ c 

d D 




"XL 
JO 


IL 

lb. 








fi 9 

0 z 


3d 


IL 

lb. 




1 fi 
1 o 


0 7 
U / 


A 9 

u z 


15 


IL 

lb. 


2 3 


0 8 


0 3 






Ik 

ID. 


doz. 


7 7 






Q 
0 


OZ. 






7 <1 
/ U 


1 A 
1 4 




oz. 


a U 


1 C 


l> 3 




19 
IZ 


lb. 


a is 


1 c 
1 3 


U 3 


n 1 

U 1 


J 


lb. 


1 a 


0 7 


A 9 




oin 


cwt. 


•> iC 
£, 0 


n a 


U O 




AO 


IL 

lb. 


9 i 


Z 3 


A A 


A 9 

u z 


z: 
0 


OZ. 






9 n 


U 4 


91 


oz. 


per 


gr. 


n A 

U 4 










9 9 


A Q 
U 0 




7(; 


oz. 




U o 


A 9 




^7 
0/ 


5 amp 


9 ft 


A 11 

U 11 


A >1 
U 4 




^0 

iL 


11 

lb. 




1 1 

1 1 


U 4 




40 


IL 

lb. 


1 a 
1 o 


n fi 

U 0 


n 9 




JO 


IL 

lb. 


Z U 


Si 7 


A 9 






IL 

lb. 


U / 


n 9 


n 1 

U 1 




Z4 


IL 

lb. 


/ lb. 


9 n 






JU 


IL 

lb. 


U B 


n ? 

U i 






0/; 


IL 

lb. 


14 lb. 


A n 


7 lU 

/ lb. 


9 9 

z z 




oz. 




Si in 
U lu 


A Q 




Ofi 
DJ 


doz. 


Jl J 


U D 


A 9 






oz. 


9 <> 


U o 








cwt. 


Z i 


n Q 
U e 


A Q 




7 


IL 

lb. 


1 P 


dll 7 


A 9 
U Z 




z: 
0 


IL 

lb. 






n 11 

U 11 


n 9 
u z 


7 


IL 

lb. 






1 9 

1 Z 


A 9 

u z 


Q 
O 


IL 

lb. 




1 Q 

1 e 


A C 


A 1 

U 1 


JO 


dr. 


a 6 


1 <: 

1 0 


A C 
U 3 


A 1 

U 1 










1 A 


A O 

U 3 


i^A 

54 


oz. 




n in 
U lu 


A Q 




1 A 

14 


IL 

lb. 


i o 
1 £ 


U 4 






V 


IL 

lb. 






9 A 
Z U 


A A 

U 4 


lo 


IL 

lb. 






1 A 
1 9 


A 01 


ou 


IL 

lb. 






6 9 


A T 

U 7 


70 


IL 

lb. 






e 9 
b Z 


1 A 


A 

4 


oz. 






C 7 
3 / 


A In 
U lU 


15 


IL 

lb. 






A C 

U b 


A 1 

U 1 


10 


IL 

lb. 






A IC 


A 1 

U 1 


1 c 
15 


IL 

lb. 










1 A 

14 


IL 

lb. 






U 7 


n 1 

0 1 


1 A 

14 


oz. 






4 3 


A O 

U 8 


iy 


IL 

lb. 




9 1 A 
Z 10 


A in 
U lU 


n 9 


DO 


IL 

lb. 




fl O 

U 0 


n 9 
U 6 


A 1 

U 1 


AO 

4/ 


IL 

lb. 




1 A 

1 4 


A C 
U 3 




JO 


IL 

lb. 


~ 


1 4 


U 5 




39 


It 

lb. 


2 0 


0 7 


0 2 




36 


11 

lb. 


2 0 


0 7 


A 9 
0 Z 




1 o 

12 


IL 

lb. 


1 I 


0 4 


0 z 




60 


oz. 


1 0 




7 lb. 


b i 


60 


oz. 


1 4 


0 5 


0 2 




18 


11 

lb. 


I 6 




"7 IL 

7 lb. 


9 0 


/ 


oz. 


1 10 


0 7 


0 2 






doz. 


1 5 


0 5 


0 2 








1 5 




71b. 


8 3 


864 


doz. 






1 1 


0 2 








2 3 


0 9 


0 2 


12 


lb. 






5 3 


1 9 


6 


oz. 


1 6 


0 7 


0 3 




42 


lb. 






1 11 


0 4 


42 


lb. 






2 8 


0 5 


6 1 


oz. 



Am — An 

Ammonium — (cont.) 



Ammon. 
Ammon. 
Ammon. 
Ammon. 
Amrfion. 
Ammon. 
Ammon. 
Ammon. 
Ammon. 
Ammon. 
Ammon. 
Ammon. 
Ammon. 
Ammon. 
Ammon. 
Ammon. 



monocarb. arom, 
nitras pur. 
nitras, coml. . . 
oxalas pur. 
persulphas 
phosphas 
phosphas coml. 
phosphas add. 
salicylas 
succinas 
sulphas pur. . . 
sulphas coml. 
sulphas coml. 
sulphocyanidum 
tartras . . 
valerianas cryst. 



Ammona lunstd. 
Amphotropin sol. 
Amygdala tunara 
Amygdala dulcis Jordan 
Amygdala dulcis Valent. 
Amygd. dulc. pulv. alb. 
Amygd. cont. (Almond meal) . . 
Amyl acetas pur. 
Amyl acetas coml. 

Amyl nitris 

Amyl nitrite capsules Tl\3 

Amyleni hydras 

Amyli pulvis (maize) . . 
Amyli pulvis (maize) . . 
Amyli pulvis (potato) . . 
Amyli pulvis (rice) 
Amyli pulvis (wheat) . . 
AmylocMn hyd 

Anaesthesin 

Anchus«e radix . . 

Anethi fructus E.I 

Anethi fructus pulvis . , 
Angelica: radix . . 
Angelicffi radicis pulvis 

Anilini hydrochlor 

Anilinum coml. opt. 

Anisi fructus 

Anisi fructus pulvis 
Anisi fructus pulvis (crs.) 
Anisole . . 

Annatto (roll) 

Annatto (liquid) 

Anthemidis (lores Ang. 
Anthemidis (lores exot. 
Anthemidis florum exot. pulv. . . 
Anthemidis (lores exot. sec. 
Antiformin substitute . . 
Antikamnia, unstd. 
Antikamnia tablets, unstd. 
Antimonii crocus pulv. 
Antimonii et sodii tartras 
Antim. et sodii tart, sterules 

(M'dale) gr. i (box of 10) .. 
Antim. sod. tarL sterules 

(M'dale) gr. ij. (box of 10) . . 
Antim. nig. pulv. 
Antim. oxidum 
Antimonium sulphuratum 
Antimonii tartarati pulv. B 
Antim. et pot. tart, "intraven." 



Selling Price 



16 oz. 

5. d. 



2 3 
1 2 



4 6 
1 10 



JO 8 
71b. 



4oz. 
». d. 



0 6 

0 3 

1 8 



1 9 


single 


amp. 


4 0 


1 


2 


0 


4 


6 0 


1 


9 


0 


6 


5 3 


1 


6 


0 


6 


7 6 


2 


2 


0 


7 


3 0 


0 


11 


0 


3 




1 


2 


u 


4 




0 


11 


0 


4 


doz. 


2 


6 












c 

3 


Q 
O 


7 Ik 

/ ID. 


2 


9 






0 11 


0 


3 


A 
U 


1 

I 


u 


0 


3 


0 


1 


0 11 


0 


4 


0 


1 


1 0 

— 


0 


4 


0 


1 


— 
1 9 


0 7 


0 


2 


1 2 


0 


5 


0 


2 


2 0 


0 


7 


0 


2 


7 6 


2 


2 


0 


8 


9 0 


2 


7 


0 


9 








0 


7 


1 10 


0 


7 


0 


2 


1 6 


0 


6 


0 


2 


2 0 


0 


7 


0 


3 


1 9 


0 


7 


0 


3 








2 


0 




1 


5 


0 


5 




1 


7 


0 


6 




1 


6 


0 


5 


4 6 


1 


4 


0 


5 




1 


5 


0 


6 


4 6 


1 


2 


0 


4 


1 6 


0 


6 


0 


2 


doz. 


1 


6 






2 3 


0 


8 


0 


3 








1 


1 


box 


6 


0 






box 


8 


0 






1 3 


0 


6 


0 


2 








1 


0 


5 3 


1 


6 


0 


5 


5 3 


1 


6 


0 


6 








1 


0 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



5 



Cost 



lOcc 
lb. 
oz. 



8 


lb. 


8 


lb. 


8 


lb. 


2 


lb. 


9 


lb. 


8 


lb. 




lb. 


8 


lb. 


4 


lb. 


8 


lb. 


2 


lb. 


8 


lb. 




lb. 


9 


lb. 


8 


lb. 


3 


gal. 


2 


lb. 


8 


lb. 




lb. 


5 


lb. 




lb. 


2 


lb. 


1 


lb. 




lb. 




lb. 




lb. 




lb. 




lb. 




lb. 




lb. 




lb. 




lb. 




lb. 




lb. 




lb. 




lb. 




lb. 




lb. 




lb. 




oz. 




dr. 




lb. 




lb. 




lb. 




lb. 




lb. 




p. 




oz. 




oz, 




oz. 




. oz. 




doz. 




doz. 




oz. 




oz. 




oz. 




oz. 




oz. 



An — Ar 



Antitoxine tabs., unstd. 
Antitoxins (y. Serological Pro- 
ducts, page 31) 
Antuitrin ' S ' P. D. & Co. . . 
Apii grav. sem. ... 

Apiol 

Apomorphinae hydroch. B 

'Aqua 

Aqua anethi 

Aqua anethi cone 

Aqua anisi dest. 

Aqua anisi cone. 1-40 -. . 

Aqua aurantii flor. trip. 

Aqua camphors 

Aqua camphors cone. . . 

Aqua cari dest 

Aqua cari cone. 1-40 . . 

Aqua caryophy'li dest 

Aqua caryophylli cone. 
Aqua chloroformi 
Aqua chloroformi cone. B.P.C. 
Aqua cinnamomi 
Aqua cinnamomi cone. 
Aqua destiliata . . 
Aqua Florid, (isoprop.). . 
Aqua (csnicuii . . 
Aqua fceniculi cone 
Aqua laurocerasi . . B 
Aqua lavand.opt.(isoprop.) P.L.F, 
Aqua lavand.sec.(i3oprop.) P.L.F. 
Aqua mellis (isoprop.) P.L.F. 
Aqua menthffi pip. dest. 
Aqua menths pip. cone. Ang.l-40 
Aqua menths pip. cone, exot.1-40 
Aqua menths viridis dest. 
Aqua picis P.L.F. 
Aqua piments dest. 
Aqua piments cone. 1-40 
Aqua pulegii dest. 
Aqua ross dest. 
Aqua ross trip. opt. 
Aqua ross cone 1-40 . . 
Aqua rosmarini . . 
Aqua rosmarini cone. 1-40 
Aqua sambuci . . 
Aqua sambuci trip. 
Aqua sambuci cone. 1-40 

Araroba 

Arbutin 

Archil 

Arctii radix 
Arctii radicis pulvis 

Areca 

Arecs pulvis 

Arecolins hydrobromidum 
Argenti bromidum 
Argenti chloridum 
Argenti iodidum 
Argenti nitras cryst. 
Argenti nit. (points in glass) 
Argenti nit. ind. (in wood) 
Argenti nit. mitigat. (sticks) 
Argenti nudeinas . . 
Argenti oxidum . . 
Argenti proteinatum 
Argenti vitellin . . 



Selling Price 



16 oz 


4 


oz. 


1 


oz. 


1 dr 


J. 




1. A 


J. 


d. 


s. 


d. 


d. 


per 


doz. 


0 


9 






— 


60 


oz. 














9 


25 














90 


oz. 


— 


18 


0 


each 


— 


31 


40 


4 3 


1 


3 


0 


5 


— 


360 


oz. 


— 










0 8 


40 


lOgr. 


per 


gr- 


1 


6 


— 


27 


lb. 














36 


lb. 














2! 


lb. 


1 0 


0 


4 


0 


2 


— ■ 


36 


lb. 


— 


7 


0 


2 


0 


0 4 


48 


lb. 


1 0 


0 


4 


0 


2 


— 


15 


lb. 


— 


5 


9 


1 


7 


0 4 


11 


lb. 


2 6 


0 


9 


0 


3 


— ■ 


648 


cwt. 


1 0 


0 


4 


0 


li 


— 


12 


oz. 


— 


2 


0 


0 


7 


0 1 


36 


oz. 


1 0 


0 


4 


0 


li 


— 


20 


lb. 


— 


6 


2 


1 


10 


0 4 


21 


lb. 


1 0 


0 


4 


0 


li 


— 


18 


lb. 


— 


6 10 


2 


0 


0 4 


42 


oz. 


1 0 


0 


4 


0 


li 


— 


18 


30 


— 


2 


2 


0 


8 


0 2 


66 


lb. 


1 3 


0 


5 


0 


2 


— 


30 


lb. 


— 


7 


0 


2 


0 


0 4 


63 


lb. 


0 4 


0 


2 






— 


72 


lb. 


— 


3 


6 


1 


0 


— 


12 


lb. 


1 0 


0 


4 


0 


1 


— 


78 


oz. 


— 


6 


7 


1 


10 


0 4 


9 


lb. 


2 0 


0 


7 


0 


2 


— 


27 


lb. 


— 


10 


4 


2 


9 


0 5 


72 


oz. 


— 


5 


0 


1 


4 


0 3 


132 


100 


— 


2 10 


0 


9 


— 


132 


100 


1 8 


0 


7 


0 


2 


— 


48 


dr. 


— 


7 


6 


2 


0 


0 4 


42 


dr. 


— 


7 


0 


2 


0 


0 4 


72 


lb. 


1 9 


0 


7 


0 


2 


— 


42 


lb. 


1 9 


0 


7 


0 


2 


— 


3 


gr. 


1 2 


0 


5 


0 


2 


— 


40 


each 


— 


7 


6 


2 


1 


0 4 


30 


oz. 


1 0 


0 


4 


0 


1 


— 






1 8 


0 


7 


0 


2 


— 






2 3 


0 


8 


0 


3 


— 






— 


7 


9 


2 


4 


0 4 






1 3 


0 


5 


0 


2 


— 


26 


lb. 


— 


6 


0 


1 


8 


0 3 


11 


oz. 


1 S 


0 


6 


0 


2 


— 


21 


lb. 


3 0 


0 11 


0 


3 


— 


6 


oz. 


— 






2 


3 


0 4 


















25 


oz. 


— 






1 


1 


0 2 


26 


oz. 


— 










3 6 


21 


lb. 


2 4 


0 


9 


0 


3 


— 


10 


lb. 


2 2 


0 


8 


0 


3 


— 


12 


lb. 


3 3 


1 


0 


0 


4 


— 


18 


lb. 


— 






0 


2 


— 


20 


lb. 


1 10 


0 


7 


0 


2 


— 


10 


lb. 


per 


gr. 


0 


6 


— 


24 


lb. 


— 










1 6 


18 


lb. 


— 










1 4 


108 


doz. 












1 6 


4 


oz. 








6 


4 


0 11 


8 


lb. 


ea. 


1 


2 








8 


lb. 


ea. 


0 


6 








17 


lb. 


ea. 


1 


0 








81 


doz. 








5 


3 


0 9 


4.5 


lb. 












1 4 


360 


cwt. 








2 


8 


0 5 


21 


dr. 








6 


9 


1 0 


51 


lb. 



Cost 



Ar— Be 



Selline Price 



Argentum colloidale 
Argentum (fol.) . . 

Argyrol 

Arheol capsules 

Aristochin 

Aristol 

Aristolochis radix 
Aristolochis radicis pulvis 
Amies flores 

Amies rhizoma . . . . 

Amies rhizoms pulvis 
Arsenicum album coml. A, B 
Arsenicum album coml. pulv. A, B 
Arsenicum album coml. pulv. A, B 
Arsenii bromidum . . A. B 
Arsenii tri-iodidum . . S 
Arsenii trioxid. . . A, B 

Arsenii sulphid. flav. pulv. B 
Arsenii sulphid. rub. pulv. B 
Arseno-triferrin . . . . B 
Arseno-trifer. tablets gr. 5 B ' 
Asafetida opt. (gtt.) 

Asafetida coml 

Asafetids pulv 

Asbestos opt 

Asbestos coml. . . 

Asparagin 

Asphaltum 

Asthma powder B.P.C. 
Atophan . . 

Atophan tablets gr. 7i . . 
Atoquinol tablets 
Atropina . . 
Atropins sulphas 
Aurantii cortex Ang. . . 
Aurantii cortex exot. 
Auri bromidum . . 
Auri chloridum (15 gr. tubes) 
Auri chloridum sol. (2%) 



B 

Balsamum anisi P.L.F. 
Balsamum Pemvianum 
Balsamum sulphuris 
Balsamum tolutanum . . 

Bandages — see page 30 
Barbitonum . . . . B 
Barbitonum solubile . . B 
Barii carbonas pur. prsc. C 
Bani carbonai comL . . C 
Barii chloridum pur. . . C 
Barii hydroxidum pur. . . C 
Barii nitras pur. cryst. . . C 
Barii nitras coml. . . C 
Barii peroxidum anhyd. C 
Barii sulphas B.P. • . . 
Barii sulphas puriss. pkd. 
Barii sulphidum . . C 

Bath powder P.L.F 

Battery solution P.L.F 

Bay rum (industrial) P.L.F. . . 
Bay rum (indust.) pkd. 

Bay salt 

Bay salt . . 
Beberins sulphas 
Belladonns fol. Ang. . . 



16 oz. 
». d. 



per 
doz. 



3 6 

4 6 



2 0 

1 6 

71b. 



2 9 
2 3 

doz. 



1 6 

1 3 



doz. 
doz. 
per 
per 

5 3 
per 



4 oz. 
J. d. 



3 6 



1 0 

1 9 

2 0 

§iij. 
0 7 
71b. 



leaf 
1 2 



1 0 
1 4 

0 11 

1 4 

0 7 
0 5 
5 3 



1 0 

0 10 

1 3 

2 6 

1 2 

2 7 
0 6 

0 4 

1 0 

2 1 
2 1 

gr- 

gr. 
2 7 
1 6 

gr. 
5 0 



1 2 
1 0 



0 10 
0 5 



I o2. 

d. 



0 1 



3 9 



0 11 

0 8 

1 4 



0 7 

1 0 
0 3 

2 9 



2 0 

0 4 

1 0 



I dr. 
f. d. 



0 7 

0 3 

141b. 
0 7 



1 3 

1 10 

8 7 

2 0 



0 1 



0 4 
0 9 



0 2 



0 2 



1 9 



1 9 



0 2 



4 — • 
0 4 



0 2 

0 7 
0 7 



0 2 



5 0 
3 1 



6 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



October 5, 1935 



Cost 


Be— Bo 


Selliag Price 


Cost 


Bo— Ca 


Sellinc Price 






1 oz. 

I 

s. a. 


1 a<. 

J 

5. O. 


16 oz. 
>. d. 






i. 


per 


16 02. 

s. A. 


4 oz. 
3. d. 


d. 


per 


4oz. 

1. d. 


1 oz. 
1. d. 


69 


lb. 


Belladonna pulverata . . 


C 




^ D 


ft Q 




30 


lb. 






1 2 


0 4 


28 


lb. 


Belladonnee rad. pulv. . . 


C 






n 4 




30 


lb. 


Boroglycerinum B.P.C 


3 9 


1 1 


0 4 


30 


lb. 


Benedict's reagent (qualit.) 






1 4 






16 


10 gm 


Brilliant green . . 








5 


oz. 


Benzaldehydum pur. 










ft 2 


174 


lb. 


Brilliantine, separable, P.L.F. . . 




D i 


1 o 


33 


dr. 


Benzaminffi hydrochloridum 






n ^ 

u o 


1 per 


4 10 


126 


lb. 


Brill iantine, separ. (isoprop.) . . . 




4 0 


1 A 

1 4 


33 


dr. 


Benzamina lactas 








/ gr. 


4 in 

t Iw 


180 


lb. 


Brilliantine, inseparable, P.L.F. 




0 5 


1 y 


42 


dr. 












6 4 


90 


lb. 


Brilliantine, insepar. (isoprop.) 




i i 


1 U 


15 


lb. 






1 Q 


u u 


U it 




55 


4 oz. 


Bromidia unstd. . . C 




0 ll 


1 Q 
1 ^ 


36 


oz. 


Benzocaina 










0 10 


13 


oz. 


Bromoformum . . 








51 


lb. 


Benzoinum Sutnat 






2 ft 


0 7 


0 1 


6 


oz. 


Bromum . . 








54 


lb. 


Benzoin! pulv. . . 




V u 




0 7 


0 1 


42 


doz. 


Bromum (2 c.c. tubes) . . 


ea. 


n 7 




4 


pt. 








ft S 


0 3 




95 


oz. 


Bromural 








7 


oz. 


Benzonaphthoi . . 








1 1 

1 L 


0 2 


39.5 


20 


Bromural tablets gr. 5 . . 


doz. 


9 A 




54 


oz. 










7 11 
c 11 


1 ? 
1 ^ 


27 


oz. 


Brucina . . . . . . R 






A n 
4 0 


6 


oz. 










fl 11 

U 11 


0 2 


24 


oz. 


Brucinae sulphas . . . . B 






6 0 




lb. 


Berberidis pulvis 




3 6 


1 0 


0 4 


0 1 


1 o 


lb. 


Bryonia; albae radix 


2 3 


0 8 


e 3 


27 


dr. 


Berberinae sulphas 




— 


— 




4 0 


39 


lb. 


Buchu . . 




1 5 


8 5 


33 


oz. 


Betaine hydrochloridum 










n 9 


9 


lb. 


tSurgundy mixture r.L.r . 


1 2 






21 


oz. 


Betanaphthylis Sal 








"i 1 

O 1 


0 6 


15 


oz. 


Butyl-chloral hydras 






*> Q 

e, 0 


40 


oz. 


Betol 








5 10 


1 0 


45 


5 XX. 


Bynin (A. & H.) 




1 9 


n 4 


• 




" Bipp " (t). Past. bis. et iod.) 












29 


20 


Butolan. tabs 




Z D 


per 


30 


lb. 


Bird-lime 








ft d 

u * 














21 


lb. 


Bird-lime qty. . . 






7 IV. 
/-iD. 


tins 


IS 3 

la V 














126 


lb. 


Bisedia (Schacht) 


r 




4 n 




n 2 






C 












Bismutlium 












12 


oz. 


Cadmii bromidum 






1 o. 
1 9 


20 


oz. 


Bismuth! benzoas 








3 0 


0 6 


21 


oz. 


Cadmii iodidum 






9 1 
o 1 


26 


oz. 


Bismuth! betanaphthol. 








% Q 


ft 7 


11 


oz. 


Cadmii sulphide 






1 Q 
I 0 


102 


lb. 


Bismuth! carbonas 






O 0 


1 ft 


fl 2 


17 


oz. 


Caffe!na . . 






9 tl 
£ D 


13 


oz. 


Bismuth! cilras . . 








1 11 


0 4 


12 


oz. 


Caffeinee benzoas 






1 Q 


21 


oz. 


Bismuth! et ammon. citras 








3 1 


0 6 


12 


oz. 


C^ffeinae citras . . 






1 Q 


18 


oz. 


Bismuth! hydroxidum . . 








2 S 


fl s 


46 


lb. 


Caffeina: citras effervescens 




1 Q 
1 0 


n ft 

U D 


30 


oz. 


Bismuth! iodidum (oxy.) 








A ■» 


0 8 


27 


oz. 


Caffeina; hydrobromidum 






A n 


26 


oz. 


Bismuth! lactas . . 








^ Q 


n 7 

u • 


40 


oz. 


Caffeinee iodidum 






D 4 


10 


oz. 


Bismuthi nitras cryst. . . 








1 6 


ft 3 


21 


oz. 


Caffeinae salicyliis 






9 1 


10 


oz. 


Bismuth! oleas . . 








1 fi 

1 o 


0 3 


16 


oz. 


Caffeinae sodio-benzoas 






9 A 
L 4 


21 


oz. 


Bismuthi oxidum 








^ 1 

O 1 


n ft 


33 


oz. 


Caffeinae sodio-iodidum 






A 1 A 
4 lU 


19 


oz. 


Bismuthi oxychloridum 








9 1ft 

^ lU 


u «> 


15 


oz. 


Caffeinee sodio-salicylas 






9 


21 


oz. 


Bismuthi oxychlor. puriss. 








3 1 

w 1 


0 6 


44 


oz. 


Caffeina valerianas 






D D 


45 


oz. 


Bismuthi oxyiodogallas 










1 Q 
1 w 


12 


lb. 


Calami aromatic! radix . . 




A C 

U b 


A *) 


66 


oz. 


Bismuthum precip. 










1 


18 


lb. 


Calami aromatic! rad. pulvis .'. 


o o 
/ a 


A A 

V 9 


A 9 


12 


oz. 


Bismuthi salicylas 








1 Q 

1 y 




30 


lb. 


Calamina artif. P.L.F 


O A 


1 i 


A A 
U 4 


12 


oz. 


Bismuthi subgallas 








1 Q 




26 


lb. 


Calamine prsparata 


a i 


1 A 


A / 

U 4 


96 


lb. 


Bismuthi subnitras 






5 D 


ft 11 


ft 7 














15 


oz. 


Bismuthi tannas , . 








9 t 


n 4 






Calcium 








18 


oz. 


Bismuthi tartras solub. 








9 Q 


n i; 
u 0 


27 


lb. 


Caici! acetas 




i A 

1 u 


A A 

U 4 


25 


oz. 


Bismuthi tribromophen. 








9 Q 


A 7 


18 


oz. 


C^Icii acetylsalicylas 






t, 0 


45 


oz. 


Bismuth! valerianas 










1 n 
1 u 


7 


oz. 


Calcii bromidum exic. 






1 1 


















6 


lb. 


Calcii carbonas . . 


A D 
U 0 


A 9 


A 1 

U 1 


80 


lb. 


Blue, Chin., pulv. 




in n 


■> in 

& JIU 


n Q 

U 3 


U £ 


15 


lb. 


Calcii chloridum (usum 


9 n 


n 7 


n 9 


60 


lb. 


Blue, Pruss., pulv. 




7 R 


U L 


n s 


fl 7 

U A 


6 


lb. 


Calcii chloridum coml. 


n in 


n A 




15 


lb. 


Boldo folia 








n 9 




11 


lb. 


Calcii chloridum cryst. 


1 9 


n c 

U D 


n 7 


8 


lb. 


Bole Armen. 




1 0 


0 4 


U 1 




13 


lb. 


Calcii chloridum gran 


f A 

I 9 


A T 

0 7 


A 9 


32 


lb. 


Boraldehyde (D.F.) .. 




1 b 


hot. 


*> c 

<2 D 


Dot. 


9 


oz. 


Calcii c!tras 






1 4 


16 


lb. 


Borax calcinatut 




2 0 


A T 
0 7 


A 9 




6 


oz. 


Calcii formas 






A O 

U 9 


6.5 


lb. 


Borax cryst. (Howards) 




1 U 


A M 
U 4 


A 11 




7 


oz. 


Calcii gluconas . . 






A 11 
U 11 


4J 


lb. 


Borax coml. cryit. 




U 7 


A 


A 1 

U 1 




7 


oz. 


Calcii glycerophos. 






1 1 


6 


lb. 


Borax purihcatiu cryst. . . 




A n 
D y 


A O 
0 S 


fl 1 

U 1 




% 


oz. 


Calcii guaiacol-sulphonas 






\A A 
14 U 


6 


lb. 


Boracis piirificati pulvit 






A 9 


A 1 




11 


lb. 


Calcii hydroxid 


1 a 


A C 


A 9 






Boracis purificati pulvis (pkd.) 




n 4i 






6 


oz. 


Calcii hypophosphis 






fl 11 


5 


lb. 


Boracis coml. pulvis 




0 8 


0 3 


0 1 




24 


oz. 


Calcii iodidum . . 






3 6 


360 


cwt. 


Boracis coml. pulvis 




71b. 


2 10 


141b. 


5 0 


26 


lb. 


Calcii lactas 


3 3 


0 11 


0 Vi 


12 


lb. 


Bordeaux mixture P.L.F. 




1 6 








8 


oz. 


Calcii lactophosphas 






1 2 






Boric lint (see p. 31) 












3 


oz. 


Calcii oxalas 






0 6 






Boric wool (see p. 30) 












16 


oz. 


Calcii peroxidum 






2 3 


84 


oz. 


Bomyl valerianas 










1 10 


15 


lb. 


Calcii phosphas 


3 9 


1 1 


0 4 


9 


gm. 






grm. 


1 0 






8 


lb. 


Calcii phosphas comL . . . , 


1 0 


0 4 


0 2 


12 


tub« 


Borocain c adrenalin tidis. 




tube 


1 6 






12 


lb. 


CaJcii phosphatis acidi pulvis . . 


1 6 


0 6 


e 2 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



7 



Coit 



per 



lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
oz. 

lb. 

cwt. 

lb. 
lb. 

oz. 

lb. 

lb. 
lb. 

oz. 
oz. 

lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

oz. 

lb. 

5 

lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

oz. 
gr. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
box 
lb. 
lb. 
oz. 

lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

oz. 

lb. 

oz. 
oz. 

lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

16 oz. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 



Ca 

Calciam — (cent.) 



Calcii phosphas di-acidus 
Gilcii phosph. mono-acid. 
Cslcii saccheiras . . 
Calcii sulphas . . 
Calcii sqlphocarbolas . . 
Calcii superphosphas coml. 
Calcii superphosphas coml. 



Cabc 

Calx chlorinata . . 
Cabc sulphurata . . 
Calendula flores 
Calf lymph (v. Lymph) 
Calumba: radix . . 
Calumbs radicis pulvis 
Cambogia 
Cambogiae pulvis 
Camphora (flores) ' 
Camphora (1-oz. tab.) . . 
Camphora (i-oz. tab.) . . 
Camphora monobromata 
Camphorae synthet. pulv. 
Campolon, 2 c.c. 
Canary seed 
Canells cortex . . 
CanellsE corticis pulvis . . 
Cannabinc tannas 
Cantharidinum . . 
Cantharis Chinensis 
Cant.haris Russ. . . 
Car.tharidis Chin. pulv. 
Caoutchouc 
Caprokol caps. . . 
Capsici (ructiu . . 
Capsici fructus pulvis sec. 
Capsicin. 

Carbo animalis gran. . , 
Carbonis animalis pulvis 
Carbo ligni 

Carbonis ligni pulvis levigatus 
Carbonis ligni saiicis pulvis 
Carbon disuiphidum 
Carbon disuiphidum coml. 
Carbon tetrachloridum 
Carbromalum 
Cardamomi sem. pulv. dec. 
Carminum opt. . . 
Carminum sec . . 
Carron oil P.LP. 
Carum 
Carum pulvis 
Carum pulvis (coarse) . . 
Caryophyllum opt. 
Caryophyllum sec. 
Caryophylli pulvis sec . . 
Cascara evacuant (P.D.) 
Cascarilla 
Caseinum (solub.) 
Caseinum eilbum lev. . . 
Caseinum glycerophos. B.P.C 
Cassia: corticis pulvis . . 
Cassias fructus . . 
Cassiaa pulpa 
Catapiasma kaolini 

Catechu 

Catechu pulvis . . 
Catechu nigrum 
Catechu nigri pulvis 



Selling Pric* 





16 oz. 


4oz. 


1 


oz. 


1 dr. 


d. 






«. d. 


I. d. 


>. 


d. 


1. (j. 


per 






1 in 

1 lU 


0 


7 


0 1 


28 








1 "k 

1 d 


0 


5 


n 1 




IK 




3 0 


0 11 


0 


3 




31 


lb. 




ft 7 
U 1 










36 


IK 








0 


9 


0 2 








U D 


0 9 








28 


lb. 




7 lU 

/ Id. 


1 Q 
1 9 


141b. 






IK 

ID* 
















IK 

lu* 




1 Q 


n R 

U 0 


0 


2 




33 

J J 


IK 




n in 


n ^ 


0 


1 




16 

1 W 


IK 








0 


7 


0 1 


IS 

1 J 


IK 






1 Q 
1 %l 


0 


6 


n 1 


4 

23 


OZ. 

lb. 






n 7 


0 


2 




31 


lb. 




1 11 


U 0 


0 


3 




16 


IK 

iU* 








1 


4 


n 3 












1 


6 






IK 




7 R 
1 0 


9 9 


0 


7 


Q 1 


63 


IK 

1L>* 








0 


8 




42 


OZ. 








0 


9 




19 


IK 








2 


4 


0 5 


10 


OZ. 






1 (I 
1 O 


0 


6 


u 1 




oz* 




each 


1 Q 
1 








7 


OZ* 




1 n 
1 u 










8 


oz. 






1 1 
1 1 


0 


4 




126 


oz* 






1 d 


0 


5 


n 1 




OZ* 


c 






11 


4 


A O 


uu 


oz. 


n 
D 










1 n 


1 


doz. 


n 
D 




9 


0 


9 




U 1 


IK 

ID. 


IS 






1 


7 








a 
a 


in R 

lu 0 




0 


10 


0 2 










n 


1 


0 




45 


IK 

£D. 




per 


box 


7 


0 




120 


IK 

lO* 




9 Q 


n in 

U lU 


0 


3 




120 


IK 




t n 
u u 


n 11 


0 


3 






IK 

ID* 
















OZ. 




1 Q 

1 y 


n R 

U 0 


0 


2 




?4 


OZ. 




1 A 
I 4 


n e 

U 9 


0 


2 




Ou 


OZ. 




n Q 


n 91 


0 


1 




77 

LI 


IK 

ID. 




1 Q 
1 o 


n ii 


0 


*2 




Q 


OZ. 




1 in 

1 lU 


n R 

U 0 


0 


2 




g 


OZ. 




B ^ 

a o 


1 7 
1 1 


0 


5 


n 1 

U 1 




OZ. 




Q n 


1 n 
1 u 


0 


4 




in 


OZ* 




R n 


1 in 

1 lU 


0 


7 


fl 1 




gm. 








7 


5 


1 1 
1 1 


1 D 


IK 

ID. 






^ 9 


0 


11 


n 9 


74 


IK 

ID. 








6 


4 


n 11 

U 11 


54 


Ik 
ID. 








4 


10 


n Q 


J 1 


Ik 




1 in 


n 7 


0 


2 




45 


Ik 
ID. 




1 7 


n 7 


0 


2 






Ik 
ID. 




*> n 

i u 


n 7 


0 


2 




■^7 


Ik 
ID. 




1 9 


fl c 
U D 








9.1 
0/ 


OZ. 






1 9 


0 


4 




54 


OZ. 




0 u 


fl 11 


0 


3 




57 


oz. 




Q n 
6 U 


n 11 

U 11 


0 


3 




54 


oz. 




la a 


A R 


1 


4 


n 


4R 


oz. 






o o 


1 


0 


n 9 


47 


oz* 




n 


1 fl 


0 


4 


n t 


77 


oz* 




R 1 
3 O 


1 7 


0 


5 


n 1 


in 


oz* 




4 6 


1 4 


0 


5 




42 


lb. 




2 0 


0 7 


0 


2 




33 


lb. 






0 7 


0 


2 




24 


lb. 






1 6 


0 


6 




30 


lb. 




1 3 


0 6 








67 


oz. 




2 7 


0 10 


0 


3 




9 


oz. 




3 3 


1 0 


0 


4 




7 


oz. 




1 9 


0 7 


0 


2 




96 


dr. 




2 6 


0 9 


0 


3 




90 


dr. 



Cost 



Ca — Co 



Caulophyllinum 
Cera alba in massa 
Cera alba in placentis . , 
Cera carnauba (grey) . . 

Cera flava Ang 

Cera (lava exot 

Cera flava exot. . . (1-oz. tab.) 
Cera Japonica . . . . . . 

Ceratum calaminae 

Ceres ina coml. alba 

Ceresina coml. flava 

Cerii oxalas 

Cetaceum 

Cetacei pulvis . . 

Cetraria Islandica 

Charta epispast. (11 in. X 8 in.) 

Chilblain lotion P.L.F. 

Chilblain paint P.L.F 

Chinosol . . 
Chirata incisa 

Chloral camphorat. B.P.C. C 
Chloral formamidum . . 
Chloral hydras . . . . C 
Chloramina 

Chloralose 

Chlorbutol 
Chloretone (P.D.) 
Chloretone Inhalant, 10 c.c. . . 
Chlorodynum B.P.C. . . B, f 
Chlorodynum (t>. Tincl. chlor. 

et morph. 1885) 
Chloroformum . . . . C 
Chlorof. aconiti B.P.C. B 
Chlorols belladonnffi B.P.C. B 
Chlorof. camphoratum B.P.C. C 
Chlorophyllum (oil-sol.) 
Chlorophyllum (spirit-sol.) 
Cholesterol 

Chondrus crispus elect. 
Chromii trioxid . . 
Chromii trioxid pur. 
Chrysarobinum . . 

Chrysoidin 

Cignolin . . 
Cimicifugas rhizoma 
Cimicifug. rhizomae pulvis 
Cinchonae calisayae cort. pulvis 
Cinchonas palhd. cort. pulvis . . 
Cinchonas succirub. cortex 
Cinchonas succirub. cort, parv. 
Cinchonae succirub. cort. pulvis 

Cinchonidina 

Cinchonidinffi hydrochloridum 
Cinchonidinas sulphas . . 
Cinchonina 

Cinchoninas hydrochloridum . . 
Cinchoninas sulphas 
Cinchophenum . . . , . , 
Cinnamic aldehyde 
Cinnamomi cortex opt. 
Cinnamomi cortex sec. 
Cinnamomi cortex parv. 
Cinnamomi cort. pulvis opt. . . 

Citrarin 

Cobalti chloridum . . 

Cobalti nitras 

Cocaina . . . . . . B, f 

Cocainas hydrochlor, . , B, F 



Selling Price 



16 oz. 
I. d. 



3 9 

3 10 

4 0 
6 9 

3 6 

4 0 

1 6 
4 2 

2 0 

1 11 

3 0 

4 0 

2 0 

each 



2 6 



3 5 



5 3 

4 2 

3 0 

3 9 



per 
per 



4oz. 
s. d. 


1 

i. 


oz. 
d. 


1 Jr. 
u i. 




Q 
w 


e 


0 8 


1 1 


n 
u 






1 2 

A £t 


fl 






1 9 
A £i 


Q 


4 




2 fl 


fl 


7 




1 fl 

A U 


n 


4 




1 2 


n 

U 


1 




n 

U Q 


A 
U 


9 

M 








e 

a 




U 9 


A 

« 


9 




0 7 


0 


2 


— 




0 


7 


0 1 


n 11 


fl 


9 
tf 




1 9 

1 Ct 


n 
u 


A 
4 




fl 7 


n 


9 




1 4 

1 Q 










n 
u 


a 






n 

u 


0 
9 










1 0 


0 9 


0 


3 


0 3 


— 


2 


11 


0 S 




A 


1 

A 


0 2 

If m 




1 
A 


9 
u 


9 2 
















U f 








1 B 

A v 


1 1 

1 0 








i R 


1 
A 




0 3 

V w 


9 K 


n 

u 


D 
9 




0 9 


1 

1 


in 
au 




7 0 


2 


0 


0 4 




1 


9 


0 4 




3 


S 


0 8 




4 


1 


0 7 




8 


9 


1 ? 

1 o 


1 n 
1 u 


0 


4 






1 


4 


0 3 




1 


4 


0 3 

w « 




2 


0 


A i 
u V 




1 


6 




n 9 


per 


grain 


n n 


0 


3 


n 1 

U I 


n 11 

U 11 


0 


4 


fl 1 


9 A 


0 


7 


fl 1 - 


9 n 


0 


7 


fl 1 

U I 


1 B 
1 0 


0 


6 


fl 1 

U I 


1 1 


0 


4 


A 1 

V 1 


1 9 

1 St 


0 


4 


fl 1 
























1 3 
















1 fl 








fl 11 




4 


0 


fl 7 




1 


6 


0 3 


1 6 


0 


8 




1 3 


0 


5 




0 11 


0 


4 




1 1 


0 


4 


0 1 








1 8 




1 


4 


0 3 




1 


1 


0 2 


gr- 


0 


5 


14 0 


gr- 


0 


5 


13 0 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



October 5, 193i 



Cost 


Co 




Selling Price 


Co«t 






























16 oz. 


4oz. 


I 


yz. 


1 ar. 






a. 


per 






A 


• A 




A 




</ 


J 
a. 


per 


90 


dr. 


Gicains nitras . . . . B,P 


per 


CT. 


0 


5 


13 


0 


96 


dr. 


90 


dr. 


Qjcainae salicylas . . B, f 


per 


er. 
* 


0 


5 


13 


0 


15 


OZ* 


44 


lOOcc 


G)caine eye-drops (factory) B, f 


^ss 


1 8 










66 


lb. 


36 


lb. 


Coccus (silver grain) .. 




4 6 


1 4 


0 


4 


0 


1 


54 


lb. 


39 


lb. 


Cocci pulvis 




5 0 


1 5 


0 


5 


0 


1 


54 


lb.. 


28 


lb. 


Cocculi indici pulvis 


C 


3 0 


1 0 


0 


4 






44 


lb. 


26 


lb. 






3 3 


1 0 


0 


4 






24 


lb. 


75 


dr. 


Codeina . . 


B 


per 




0 


3 


10 


9 


24 


lb! 


63 


dr. 


Codeinas phosphas 


B 


pel 




0 


3 


9 


0 


22 


lb. 


69 


dr. 


Codeinffi sulphas 


B 


per 




0 


3 


10 


0 


36 


lb. 


255 




Codeonal.. 


B 










6 


0 


15 




29 


10 


Codeonal tablets, 2+ gr. 


B 


doz 


4 4 










42 


lb. 


22 


lb. 


Colchici corm. exot. pulv. (20) C 




0 10 


0 


3 






18 


Ib. 


36 


lb. 


Colchici sem. pulvis 






1 4 


0 


5 


0 


1 


21 


lb. 


13 




Colchicina 


B 


per 




2 


3 






15 


lb. 


15 




Colchicine salicylas 
Collodia 


B 


per 


AT. 


2 


3 






18 
360 


lb. 

cwt 


33 

J J 


lb. 


Collodium flexile 






1 3 


0 


5 


0 


1 




Ib. 


42 


lb. 


Collodium acetonum B.P.C. 






1 6 


0 


6 


0 


1 


7 


Ib. 


14 




Collodium anodynum B.P.C. 


B 






2 


0 


0 


4 


6 


lb. 


10 




Collodium belladonns B.P.C. 


B 






1 


6 


0 


3 


8 


lb. 


50 


lb. 


Collodium salicylicum B.P.C. 






1 10 


0 


7 


0 


1 


72 




168 


lb. 


Collodium salicyl. co. B.P;C. 


C 






1 


9 


0 


3 


78 




102 


lb. 


Collodium stypticum B.P.C. 








1 


0 


0 


2 


54 


lb. 


18 




Collodium vesicans 


C 






2 


8 


0 


6 


36 
18 


10 gm 
10 


36 




Collosol argent. (Crookes) 






4 0 


1 


6 


0 


3 


20 


oz> 


54 




CoIIosol arsen. (Crookes) 


C 




6 0 


1 


9 


0 


3 


42 


lb. 


54 


O 'v. 


Collosal bism. (Crookes) 






6 0 


1 


9 


0 


3 


54 


Ib. 


41 




• Collosol hydr. (Crookes) 






4 6 


1 


4 


0 


3 


26 


lb. 


50 


§ lij- 


Collosol hydrarg. et sulphur. 














54 


lb. 






(Crookes) 






5 6 


1 


6 


0 


3 


192 


Ib. 


22.5 




Collosol iodine (Crookes) 






2 6 


0 


9 


0 


2 


22 


Ib. 


45 




Collosol iodine in oil . . 






0 


1 


6 


0 


3 


16 


lb. 


45 


o J- 


Collosol manganese (inj.) 








5 


0 


0 


9 


22 


lb. 


36 


^iv 
o »*• 








4 0 


1 


2 


0 


2 


19 


lb. 


31.5 


5 VUJ. 


Collosol sulphur 






2 0 


0 


6 


0 


1 


22 


lb. 


60 




Colocynthidis pulpa 






2 2 


0 


8 


0 


2 


54 


Ib. 


72 


lb. 


Colocynthidis pulpee pulvis 






2 7 


0 


9 


0 


2 


36 


lb. 


35 


4 oz. 


Colofine (Oppenheimer) 






4 4 


1 


2 


0 


3 


39 


lb. 


1 1 


lb. 


Coloplionii pulv. 




1 6 


0 6 


0 


2 






46 


lb. 


o 


IK 


Colophonium 




1 0 


0 4 


0 


2 






5 




97 

LI 


ID* 


Composition essence 






1 0 


Q 


4 






24 


Ib. 


7A 


ID. 


Composition powder P.L.F. 






0 11 


Q 


3 






48 


lb. 


Of 




Compral tablets 




doz 


2 0 










13 


Ib. 


30 


lb. 


Confectio guaiaci co. B.P.C. 




4 0 


1 2 


0 


4 


0 


1 


6 


lb. 


30 


lb. 


Confectio paraSini B.P.C 




3 9 


1 2 


0 


4 






609 




30 


lb. 


Confectio petrolei 




3 9 


1 2 


0 


4 






9 


Ib. 


33 


lb. 


Confectio piperis 






1 3 


0 


4 


0 


1 


30 


lb. 




IK 


Confectio rosje gallic . . 






1 3 


0 


5 






60 


lb. 


18 


lb. 


Confectio sennee 




2 4 


0 9 


0 


3 






54 


lb. 




lb. 


Confectio sennee et sulph. B.P.C. 


4 2 


1 3 


0 


4 






42 


lb. 


JO 


IK 


Confectio sulphuris 




5 0 


1 6 


0 


5 


0 


1 


10 


lb. 




oz. 














1 


2 


12 


lb. 


it 






B 


per 


g'- 


1 


2 






10 


lb. 


8 


gr- 


Conlna! hydrobromidum 


B 


per 




1 


2 






36 


Ik 


J7 


IK 

ID. 


Copaiba , . 






1 c 


0 


6 


0 


1 


22 


Ib. 


Q 


OZ. 


Copaibae resina 








1 


4 


0 


3 


60 


Ib. 




lb. 


Copal elect. 




4 3 


1 3 


0 


5 










30 


lb. 


Copal pulv. 




3 9 


1 4 


0 


5 










36 


each 


Corcuninc 1 •7c.c., 5 eimps. 






4 0 


per 


box 


30 


ib. 


8 


ib. 






1 0 


0 4 


0 


1 






42 


Ib. 


12 


lb. 






1 6 


0 6 


0 


2 






36 


lb. 


10 


lb. 


Coriand. pulvis (crs.) . . 
Com solvent (y. Collod. callos 


.) 


1 3 


0 5 


0 


2 






24 
24 


gr. 
gr. 


110 


lb. 


Coster's paste . . 








0 


8 


0 


2 


36 


lb. 


57 


dr. 


Cotaminae hydrochloridum 


B 


per 


gr. 


2 


2 


8 


4 


12 


lb. 


57 


dr. 


Cotaminae phthalas 


B 


per 


gr. 


2 


2 


8 


4 


24 


Ib. 



Co— De 



Cotoinum 
Coumarinum 

Creme d'amandes, scented 
Creme d'amandes, unscented 
Cremor bismuthi 
Cremor frigidum P.L.F. 
Cremor frigidum P.L.F. 
Crem. frig. " American " P.L.F, 
Crem. frigid. " theatrical " P.L.F, 
Crem. zinci B.P.C. 
Creosoti carbonas 
Creosotum . . . . C 

Cresol C 

Creta cum camphora 12i% 
Creta c. camph. 10% . . 
Creta Gallica (tab.) 
Cretas Gall, pulvis ' 
Cretae Gall, pulvis 
Cretae Gall, pulvis subtiL 
Creta prsparata 
Creta prasparata rubra . . 

Crocus Valent 

Crocus Valent." pulv. 
Croup embrocation P.L.F. 
Cryogenine 

Cryogenine tablets gi. 4 
Crystal violet (medicinal) 
Cubebae fructus 
Cubebae fructus pu'vis . . 
Cucumber cream 
Cucumber paste 
Cucumber pomade 
Cudbear . . 
Cumini fructus . . 
Cumini fructus pulvis . . 
Cumini fructus pulvis (crs.) 
Cupri ammon. sulph. . . 
Cupri carbonas pur. 
Cupri chloridum pur. . . 
Cupri nitras 
Cupri oleas 
Cupri oxidum pur. 
Cupri oxidum coml. 
Cupri oxyacet. pulv. (aerugo) 
Cupri sulphas . . 
Cupri sulphas coml. opt. 
Cupri sulphas coml. 
Cupn sulphas coml. pulvis 
Cupri sulphas exsiccatus 
Cuprum (filings) 
Cuprum (foil) . . 
Cuprum (turnings) 
Curcumae rhizoma 
Curcumas rhizomae pulvis 
Curcumae rhizomee pulvis (crs, 
Currie powder opt. P.L.F. 
Currie powder sec. P.L.F. 
Cydoniae semina 

D 

Dale's plaster P.L.F. 
Damar gummi . . 
Daturae tatulse pulvis 
Daturina . . . . B 

Daturinas sulphas . . B 
Dec. agropyri cone I to 7 
Dec. agropyri recens 
Dec aloes co. . . 



Sellinc Price 


16 oz. 


4oz. 


1 oz. 


1. i. 


1. i. 


i. 


per 


gr. 


0 3 


"~" 




2 4 


8 6 


2 5 


0 8 


6 9 


2 0 


0 7 


8 6 


2 10 


0 9 




1 7 


0 6 




1 0 


0 4 




1 0 


0 4 


2 9 


0 10 




4 6 


1 4 


0 5 






2 2 




1 7 


0 6 


2 3 


0 8 


0 3 


2 8 


0 10 


0 3 


2 0 


0 7 


0 3 


2 3 


0 8 


0 3 


7Ib. 


2 9 


141b. 


0 9 


0 3 


0 1 


0 10 


0 3 


0 1 


0 9 


0 3 


0 1 


1 0 

■ — 


0 4 


0 2 


6 9 


2 0 


■~ 
0 7 


— 
doz. 


— 
2 9 




— 




3 0 


— 


1 6 


0 6 




2 0 


0 7 


— 


1 0 


0 4 


6 0 


1 9 


0 6 


■ 


6 10 


2 0 


— 


0 10 


0 3 


2 0 


0 7 


0 2 


2 9 


0 10 


0 3 


2 4 


0 8 


0 3 


2 9 


0 10 


0 3 


— 


2 0 


0 7 


4 6 


1 4 


0 5 


S 0 


1 5 


0 5 


5 9 


1 8 


0 6 


— 


— 


0 10 


2 8 


0 9 


0 3 


6 0 


1 9 


0 6 


2 0 


0 7 


0 2 


0 9 


0 3 


0 1 


7 Ib. 


4 8 


141b. 


1 2 


0 4 




3 9 


1 1 


0 4 




2 2 


0 8 




2 0 


0 7 


5 3 


1 6 


0 5 


1 3 


0 5 


0 2 


1 6 


0 6 


0 2 


1 3 


0 5 


0 2 


4 6 


1 4 


0 0 


2 9 


0 10 


0 3 


— 


2 2 


0 8 




1 1 


0 4 


5 3 


1 7 


0 5 




1 4 


0 5 


per 


gr. 


3 6 


per 


gr. 


3 6 




1 4 


0 6 


1 6 


0 6 


0 2 




0 11 


0 3 



October 5. 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



Coit 



lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
oz. 

lb. 

30 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
12 
100 
oz. 
dr. 
lb. 
oz. 
lb. 
oz. 

lb. 
lb. 

15c.c. 

25 

oz. 
gr. 15 
lOcc 

12 

gr- 

gr. 

40 

lb. 

lb. 

er- 

100 
4oz. 

gm. 

oz. 

20 

oz. 

oz. 

gr- 
lb. 
lb. 



De— Ea 



Dec. aloes co. cone. 1 to 3 
Dec aloes co. recens . . 
Dec. cinch, rubr. cone. 1 to 7 
Dec. cinchonte flav. e. 1 to 7 
Dec. cuspariae cone. I to 7 
Dec. dulcamar. cone. 1 to 7 
Dec. gossypii rad. cort. rec. 
Dec. granati cort. cone 1 to 7 
Dec. haemat. cone. 1 to 7 
Dec. haematoxyli reeens 
Dec. hemidesmi cone. 1 to 7 
Dec. mezerei cone. 1 to 7 
Dec. papaveris cone. 1 to 7 C 
Dec. papav. et anth. cone. C 
Dec. pareirae cone. 1 to 7 
Dec. quercus cone. 1 to 7 
Dec. sarsae Jam. (simp.) cone. 

1 to 7 

Dee. sars. Jam co. cone. 1 to 7 
Dec. sarsae co. cone. 1 to 7 
Dec. scoparii cone. 1 to 7 
Dee. senegae cone. 1 to 7 
Dec. taraxaci cone. 1 to 7 . 
Dec. ulmi cone. B.P.C. 1 to 7 . 
Dec. uvae ursi cone. I ta 7 
Dermatol 

Derris pulv 

Devegan tabs. . . 
Devonshire oils P.L.F. • 

Dextrin, alb 

Dextrin, flav 

Dextrosum 

Dial tablets, orig. tube . . B 
Dial tableU . . . . B 
Diamidophenol. hydroehloridum 
Diamorphinae hydrochl. B, F 
Diapente P.L.F. 
Diastasum 

Dicalcium phosphate (P.D.) 
Dichloramin. — T. 
Dichiorobenzene ortho. 
Dichiorobenzene para . . 

Digalen C 

Digifoline tablets . . C 
Digifortis (P.D.) 
Digipuratum . . . . C 
Digipuratum liq. . . C 
Digipuratum tablets . . C 
Digitalinum amorph. . . B 
Digitalinum cryst. . . B 
Digitaiine granules (Nativ.) . . 
Digitalis folia Ang. . . C 
Digitalis pulverata . . ' C 
Digitonin . . . . B 

Dimol pulverettes 
Dimol syrup 

Dioninum . . . . B 
Diuretin . . 

Diuretin tablets gr. 7i . . 
Dolichos pubes . . 
Dormigene pulv. (A. & H.) B 
Duboisinae sulphas . . B 
Dulcamara 

Dusting powrder P.L.F. 



Eau de Cologne opt. P.L.F. . , 
Eau de &)logne opt. (Isoprop.) 



16. 



3 9 

3 0 
1 9 



5 0 

doz. 

0 11 

0 11 

1 9 

tube 
doz. 

per 

2 0 

6 0 



doz. 

per 

doz. 
per 
per 
doz. 



doz. 
per 
doz. 

per 



34 6 



Sellint; Price 


Cost 


4oz. 
t. d. 


1 OZ. 

d. 


1 dr. 
>. d. 


J 
a. 


per 


1 3 


0 4 


0 1 


216 


lb. 


1 2 


0 4 


— 






1 6 


0 6 


0 1 


126 


lb. 


1 4 


0 5 


0 1 


14 




2 0 


0 7 


0 1 


6 




1 7 


0 6 


0 1 


72 


dr. 


1 0 


0 3 


— 


30 


lb. 


2 0 


0 7 


0 1 






1 2 


0 4 


0 1 






0 7 


0 2 


— 






2 1 


0 8 


0 2 






1 7 


0 6 


0 1 


54 


lb. 


1 2 


0 5 


0 1 


84 


lb. 


1 8 


0 6 


0 1 


% 


lb. 


1 9 


0 6 


0 1 


99 


lb. 


1 4 


0 5 


0 1 


54 


lb. 








54 


lb. 


2 5 


0 9 


0 2 


48 


lb. 


2 0 


0 7 


0 1 


48 


lb. 


2 2 


0 8 


0 2 


72 


lb. 


1 1 


0 4 


0 1 


123 


lb. 


1 4 


0 5 


0 1 


80 


lb. 


1 8 


0 6 


0 1 


32 


lb. 


2 1 


0 7 


0 1 


75 


lb. 


1 2 


0 4 


0 1 


54 


lb. 


— 


4 7 


0 8 


57 


lb. 


1 5 


0 5 


— 


57 


lb. 


1 6 





— 


48 


lb. 


0 5 


0 2 


— 


48 


lb. 


0 4 


0 2 


— 


72 


lb. 


0 4 


0 2 


— 






0 7 


0 2 


— 


68 


16 oz. 


2 0 


— 


— 


54 


lb. 


1 6 


— 


— 


54 


IK 


— 


1 9 


0 3 


102 


lb. 


gr. 


0 4 


— 






0 7 


0 2 


— 


45 


lb. 


— 


3 0 


0 7 


56 


lb. 


2 0 


— 


— ■■ 


66 


lb. 


— 


5 3 


0 9 


92 


lb. . 


1 4 


0 5 


— 


32 


lb. 


1 4 


0 5 


— 




IK 


— 


8 6 


1 4 


30 


IK 


1 6 


— 


— 


19 




— 


— 


0 7 


70 


16 oz. 


gr. 


0 2 


— 




IK 

ID. 


— 


— 


1 4 


17 


IK 


3 0 


— 


— 


66 


IK 


gr. 


1 1 


— 


7 J 


IK 


gr. 


15 10 


— 


72 


IK 

lu. 


0 11 


— 


— 




IK 


1 6 


0 6 


0 1 


Jl 


IK 

ID. 


— 


0 8 


0 2 


54 


lb. 


— 


— 


— 


M\ 
■oo 


IK 

ID. 


1 0 


— 


— 


on 


IK 

ID. 


— 


1 4 


0 3 


54 


IK 

ID. 


gr. 


0 4 


— 


j\j 


Ik 


— 


— 


1 0 




ID. 


1 8 


— 


— 


78 


lb. 




7 6 


1 2 


52 


lb. 






2 7 


32 


lb. 


gr. 


1 10 




33 


lb. 


0 9 


0 3 




30 


lb. 


1 3 


0 4 




72 


16 oz. 








108 


16 oz. 








78 


lb. 


10 0 


2 10 


0 6 


96 


lb. 


5 9 


1 9 


0 4 


105 


1 lb. 



Ea— El 



Selling Price 



16 oz. 
>. i. 



Eau de Cologne sec. 

Eau de Cologne sec. pkd. 

E!au de Cologne see. (isoprop.) 

Eikonogen 

Elaterinum 

Elaterium Ang 

Elemi 



Eliixir 

Elixir aletridis B.P.C 

Elixir ai;omatieum B.P.C 

Elixir aurantii B.P.C 

Elixir aurantii eomp. B.P.C. . . 
Elixir benzyl benzoatis . . 

Elixir bismuthi B.P.C 

Elixit bismuth sal. B.D.H. 
Dixir bromoformi B.P.C. 
Elixir camphorae monobromatae 
Elixir cascarae et euonymi B.P.C. 
Elixir cascara: sag. P.L.F. 
Elixir cascarae sag. 
Elixir cinchonas B.P.C. 
Elixir eocae B.P.C. . . C 
Elixir codein. co. . . C 
Elixir codein. co. B.D.H. 
Elixir diamorph. et pini co. B, F 
Elixir diamor. et ter. B.P.C. B. ¥ 
Elixir diamorph. et terp. c. apo- 

morph. B.P.C. ..C.exF 
Elixir enzymes (Armour) 
Elixir ephedrin . . 
Elixir ethylmorph. et terp. C 
Elixir fern, quin. et stryeh. phos. 

B.P.C 

Elixir formatum B.P.C. 
Elixir formatum co. 

Elixir glusidi B.P.C 

Elixir guaiacol. co. 
Elixir idaei co. . . 
Elixir ipecacuanhae B.P.C. 

Elixir kolae B.P.C 

Elixir lactated pepsin (Armour) 
Elixir lactopeptin. 

Elixir lecithin B.P.C 

Elixir lecithini compositum 
Elixir luminal . . . . C 
Elixir papaini B.P.C. . . 
Elixir pepsini B.P.C. 
Elixir pepsini co. P.L.F. 
Elixir pepsini et bism. eo. B.P.C. 
Elixir peptolacticum . . . . 
Elixir phosphori B.P.C. 
Elixir phosphori co. B.P.C, 
Elixir pini compositum B, F 
Elixir pruni virg. 
Elixir quininae ammon. B P.C. 
Elixir quininae amm. co. B.P.C. 

Elixir rhei B.P.C 

Elixir rubi idaei . . 
Elixir sennae fructus B.P.C. 
Elixir simplex B.P.C. .. 
Elixir terpheroini co. (D.F.) B. F 
Elixir terpheroini (Squire) 6, F 
Elixir terpheroini co. . . B, F 
Elixir vibum. prunif. B.P.C. . . 
Elixir vibum. prun. co. B.P.C. 



23 0 



per 
per 



10 0 



4 oz. 
>. d. 



6 0 
8 6 
4 6 

gr. 
gr. 
1 2 



2 10 
5 6 
2 10 

1 7 

2 10 
2 0 
2 8 
2 2 
2 0 

1 10 

2 9 
2 2 
2 0 
2 3 



1 10 
1 2 



2 10 
2 2 



3 11 



oz. 

, d. 



1 9 

Sij. 

1 4 



0 
1 
1 
1 

0 
0 
0 
0 
0 

1 

0 10 
0 6 
0 9 
0 7 
0 8 
0 8 
0 8 
0 7 

0 10 
0 7 
0 7 

0 9 

1 4 

0 6 
0 8 
0 9 
0 11 
0 6 



0 10 
0 10 



0 11 
0 10 
0 7 
0 6 
0 5 
0 5 

0 10 

1 0 
1 0 
1 0 
1 1 



I dr. 
J. d. 



0 5 

2 6 

0 3 

0 4 



0 1 

0 2 

0 2 

0 2 



0 2 



0 1 



0 1 



0 1 
0 2 



0 1 

0 1 

0 2 

0 2 

0 1 



0 2 

0 2 

0 2 
0 2 

0 1 
0 2 

0 2 

0 2. 



10 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



October 5, 1935 



Cott 


§4 ywi Pi" 


Selliag Prict 


Co«t 


Et— Ex 




SelliDf Price 


J 

a. 


p«r 


16 01. 


4 oz. 

s. A 


1 oz. 
». i. 


1 dr. 
». i. 


i. 




16 oz. 
1. d. 


4 oz. 
t. a. 


1 


OZ. 
J 
a. 


1 dr. 


7 


gr. 


Lmetma o 


per 


gr. 


1 2 





74 


50 cc. 


Ethyl morrhuas . . 




per 


C.C 


0 


3 




7 


ST. 


hmetin. period . . 


per 


gr. 


1 1 





5 


oz. 


Ethyl phthalate . . 








0 


9 


0 2 


6 


gr. 


Lmetinae bismutnt lodiaum B 


per 


gr. 


0 11 





96 


oz. 


EucaincE hyd. (beta) 













2 4 


6 


gr. 


hmetmae hyarochlondum d 


per 


gr. 


0 11 





96 


oz. 


Eucainae lact. (beta) 












2 4 


84 


lb. 


IT I • L 1 L «. 

onulsio benzyl benzoate 




3 4 


1 0 





20 


lb. 


Eucalypti folia Ang. 




2 6 


0 9 


0 


3 




48 


lb. 


hmulsio bismuth et magnesiae 





2 2 


0 8 





24 


lb. 


Eucalypti fol. pulv. 




3 0 


0 11 


0 


3 




15 


lb. 


Lmulsio chlorotormi D*r.L-. . . 






0 3 


0 1 


7 


oz. 


Eucalyptol 




~" 




1 


1 


0 2 


60 


lb. 


hmuls, lodoTormi lU per cent. 




3 0 


0 10 




50 


oz. 


Eugallol . . 








6 


0 


1 2 


48 


lb. 


hmuls. mentn. pip. rJ.r.L.. 





1 9 


0 6 




12 


oz. 


Eugenol . . 








1 


9 


0 3 


13 


lb. 


hmuls. olei morrhuae b.r.C . . 


2 3 


0 8 


0 3 





36 


oz. 


Euonyminum virid. 






_ 


5 


3 


0 9 






hmuls. 01. morrh. DUyo pkd. . . 


§ vj. 


1 9 


o xij. 


3 0 


16 


lb. 


Eupad 




2 0 


0 8 


0 


3 




27 


lb. 


hmuls. ol. morrh.c.hypoph.D.r.u. 


3 6 


1 0 






36 


lb. 


Euphorbii gummi pulvit 






1 4 


0 


5 




51 


lb. 


hmuls. ol. morrh. pancr. d r.U. 


6 6 


2 0 


0 7 





192 


oz. 


Euquinine 












4 7 


56 


lb. 


hmuls. ol. morrh. pancr, et malti 










45 


oz. 


Euresol . . 






_ 






1 1 






B.P.C. 


7 2 


2 3 


0 7 





22.4 


amp. 


Evipan sodium . . 


B 




2 6 


per 


amp. 


28 


lb. 


hmuls. ol. olivae b.r.C 


3 10 


1 2 











Extracta 












66 


lb. 


hmuls. ol* olivae co. D.r.O- 


9 0 


2 7 








21 


oz. 


Ext. aconiti radicis ale. 


fi 







3 


2 


0 6 


21 


lb. 


hmuls. petrolei (agar; . . 


2 6 


0 9 








11 


oz. 


Ext. adonis vernalis liq. 









1 


8 


0 3 


18 


lb. 


hmuls* petrolei c. agar iN.l.r. 


2 4 


0 9 


0 3 





51 


lb. 


Ext. agropyri liquidum 






2 0 


0 


8 


0 2 


18 


lb. 


CI J. _L ll»-Ll 

hmuls. petr. agar phenolphthal* 










108 


lb. 


bxt. aletridis hquidum B.r.L.. 






4 0 


1 


1 


0 2 






Mir" 

N.I.r 


2 4 


0 9 


0 3 





54 


lb. 


Ext. aloes pulvis 






2 0 


0 


7 


0 1 


21 


lb. 


fcjnuls. petr. phenolphthal.(agar; 


2 6 


0 9 







36 


oz. 


Ext. aloes Barbadensis glac 








4 


6 


0 11 


18 


lb. 


Lmuls. petr. c. nypoph. tJ.r.L.. 


2 0 


0 7 


0 2 





9 


oz. 


Ext. aloes Socotrinae pulvis 






_ 


1 


9 


0 3 


144 


doz. 


hmuls. petrolei . . . . ^ pka. 




1 6 


§ viij. 


1 9 


24 


oz. 


Ext. anthemidis pulvis '98 









3 


1 


0 6 


24 


dr. 


Ephedrina alk. . . . . B 


per 


gr. 


0 2 


3 6 


14 


oz. 


Ext. apocyni liquidum . . 









2 


0 


0 4 


18 


dr. 


hphednnee hydrochlondum B 


per 


gr. 


0 2 


2 8 


150 


lb. 


E!xt. arnica liq. . . 






5 5 


1 


7 


0 3 


18 


dr. 


bphednne sulphas . . u 


per 


gr. 


0 2 


2 8 


60 


lb. . 


Ext. belae liquidum 






2 2 


0 


8 


0 2 


13 


oz. 


Ergota preparata . . B 






1 10 


0 4 


12 


oz. 


Ext. belladonncB siccum 


B 






1 


9 


0 3 


108 


.1 gm* 


Ergotoxin ethanesulph. B 


0 4 


for 


0.1 


gm. 


108 


lb. 


Ext. belladonnae liquidum 


B 




4 6 


1 


4 


0 3 


(fy 


,1 grnf 


Ergotoxin phosph. . . B 


0 3 


for 


O.I 


gm. 


102 


lb. 


Ext. belladonnae viride '98 


B 




3 9 


1 


0 


0 2 


90 


4 oz- 


Ernutin B 






2 10 


0 6 


13 


oz. 


Ext. belladonnae viridis pui 


v. 












31 


dr. 


Erythrityl let. dil 


per 


gr. 


0 3 








•98 


B 







1 11 


0 4 


102 


dr. 


Ejythrol tetrjinitras 


per 


8T. 


0 S 





13 


oz. 


Ext. boldo liquidum 









1 10 


0 4 


21 


lb." 


E^bachs solution 




0 10 


0 3 





36 


oz. 


Ext. bone marrow 









4 


6 


0 11 


42 




Ess. ambrae grisese 







6 2 


1 0 


24 


oz. 


Ext. buchu 






, 


3 


6 


0 6 


24 


oz* 


Elss. amygdalae 1 in 16 . . 







3 6 


0 6 


132 


lb. 


Ext. buchu liquidum B.P.C. 






5 2 


1 


7 


0 3 


24 


oz* 


Ess. aniti 1 in 5 







3 6 


0 6 


15 


oz. 


Ext. cacti grandifiori liquidum . . 






2 


3 


0 4 


28 


oz* 









3 10 


0 8 


39 


oz. 











5 


9 


0 10 


114 


lb. 


Ess. camphoree B.P.C 





3 9 


1 0 




,14 


oz. 


Ext. calendula liq. 









2 


2 


0 4 


1 J 




Ess. cherry, fruit 







2 0 


0 4 


15 


oz. 


Ext. calumbee 









2 


3 


0 4 






Ess. cinnamomi . . 






4 5 


0 9 


60 


dr. 


Ejct. cannabis indicae . . B, 






_ 






8 9 


78 


lb. 


Ess. cinnam. et quin. P.L.F. . . 





2 9 


0 9 




108 


lb. 


Ext. cascaree sag. sicci pulvis 






3 10 


1 


1 


0 2 


27 


oz. 


Ess. fridis 





4 0 




0 7 


30 


lb. 


Ext. cascarae sag. liquidum 




3 9 


1 1 


0 


4 


0 1 


246 


lb. \ 


Ess. limonis. (soluble) . . 


_ 


9 0 


2 6 


0 4 


51 


lb. 


Ext. cascara: sag. liquidum insip. 


C A 

b 4 


1 11 


0 


7 


0 1 


456 


lb. 


Ess. menth. pip. (Ang.) 1 in 5 . . 







3 6 


0 7 


114 


lb. 


Ext. caulophylli liquidum 






4 2 


1 


2 


0 2 




lb. 


Ess. menth. pip. (Ang.) Im lU 






3 1 


0 6 


8 


oz. 










1 


2 


0 2 


752 


lb. 


Ess. menth. pip. (exot.) 1 in 10 


_ 


8 6 


2 4 


0 4 


60 


lb. 


Ext. cinchonse liquidum 






2 4 


0 


8 


0 2 






Ess. moschi 






7 5 


1 2 


144 


lb. 


Ext. cocee liquidum . . B, f 




5 6 


1 


7 


0 3 


75 

/ J 




Ess. moschi fort. 






10 2 


1 6 


24 


oz. 


Ext. colchici aceticum . . 


C 






3 


6 


0 8 


lU 




Elss. pear Gargonelle) .. 






2 9 


0 6 


11 


oz. 


Ext. colchici liq. 


C 




, . 


1 


8 


0 3 


?2 




Ess. pineapple . . 






2 4 


0 4 


30 


oz. 


Ext. colchici sice. 


C 







4 


5 


0 8 


Qfi 

7U 


lb. 


Ess. pulegii 1 in 10 




3 5 


1 0 


0 2 


30 


oz. 


Elxt. colchici sem. acet. 


C 







4 


5 


0 8 


1 *f 


OZ* 


Ess. raspberry (fruit) . . 






2 0 


0 4 


10 


oz. 


Ext. coUinsonia liq. 









1 


6 


0 3 


14 


lb. 


Ess. rennet 


1 9 


0 7 


0 3 




20 


oz. 


Ext. colocynthidis pulvis 








3 


0 


0 5 


17 




Ess. strawberry . . 






2 6 


0 5 


6 


oz. 


Ext. colocynthidis co. . . 









1 


0 


0 2 


24 




Ess. vanillae P.L.F. 




_ 


3 6 


0 6 


99 


lb. 


Ext. condurtmgo liquidum 






3 7 


1 


0 


0 i 






Ess. vanillse fort. 






5 3 


0 9 


8 


oz. 


E!xt. conii 


C 






1 


2 


0 2 


14 




Ess. vanillas (isoprop.) . . 






2 0 


0 4 


11 


oz. 


Ext. conii liquidum 


C 







1 


8 


0 3 


lO 


oz 


Ess. vanillin P.L.F 






2 8 


0 5 


18 


oz. 


Ext. convallariae liquidum 









2 


8 


0 s' 


87 


lb.' 


Elss. zingiberis . . 


9 10 


2 10 


0 9 


0 2 


14 


oz. 


Ext. coto liquidum 






— 


2 


0 


0 4 


42 


oz. 








5 3 


1 0 


22 


oz. 


Ext. damianae pulvis 








3 


3 


0 7 


10 


oz. 


Ethyl bromidum . • • . 








0 6 


120 


lb. 


Ext, damianae liquidum 






4 3 


1 


2 


0 2 


74 


50 cc. 


Ethyl chaulmoogras 


per cc. 


0 3 






18 


oz. 


E!xt. droserae rotund, liquidum 






2 


8 


0 5 


31 


ea. 


Ethyl chloridum (30 c.c.) 


ea. 


4 0 






51 


oz. 


Ext. ergotae 


B 






7 


4 


1 1| 


42 


ea. 


Ethyl chloridum (50 c.c.) 


ea. 


5 3 






54 


oz. 


Ext. ergotae pulvis 


B 






7 11 


1 2 


74 


50 cc 


Ethyl hydnocarpas 


per c.c. 


0 3 






120 


lb. 


Ext. ergot, liq 


B 




4 5 


1 


3 


0 3; 


31 


oz. 


Ethyl iodidum . . 








1 4 


108 


lb. 


Elxt. ergotae liquidum '14 


B 




4 0 


1 


1 


0 21 


72 


dr. 


Ethyl morphinee hydrochl. B 


per 


gr. 


0 4 




156 


lb. 


Ext. ergotae ammon. liq. 


B 




5 8 


1 


7 


0 3 

i 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



11 



Cott 


Ex 


Selling Price 


Cost 


Ex — Fe 

Extract a — (cont.) 


Selling Price 


























i. 


per 


16 oz. 
«. i. 


4oz. 

1. d. 


t oz. 
•. A. 


1 dr. 
J. J. 


d. 


per 


16 oz. 
1. d. 


4 01. 
*. d. 


1 oz. 

>. d. 


1 dr. 
>. d. 


30 


oz. 


V 




~ 


4 5 


0 8 


1 1 


oz. 


Ext. pulsatillfic liquidum 






~ 


1 8 


0 3 


76 


lb. 


i_«Xli CUpilUIUltE IK^UlUlilll ■ • 




2 10 


0 10 


0 2 


126 


It 

lb. 


Ext. pyrethri rad liq. 






4 7 


1 4 


0 3 


14 


oz. 


r* vf rAlliG ri/^viniim 

ll<Al> IClllsi UUVillLlIll ■ • ■ • 






2 0 


0 4 




oz. 


Ext. quassise puIvis . , 








2 11 


0 6 


16 


02. 


r* Tfiliic ru^vimim mtiv - 

l_jJkL> iclllo UUVlliUIll JJUtV* ■ ■ 






2 4 


0 4 


44 


11 

lb. 


Ext. quassia liq. , . 






I 7 


A /* 

0 6 


A 4 

0 1 


10 


oz. 


r* vt Tl Il^lQ 




~ 


1 0 


A O 

0 3 


LC 
00 


lb. 


Ejct. quillaicE liquidum . . 






2 6 


A A 

0 9 


A A 

0 2 


9 


oz. 


Ext fuci B P C nulv 






1 4 


0 3 


1 o 

12 


oz. 


Ext. rhamni frang. liquidum 








1 A 

I 9 


0 3 


60 


lb. 


r* ^ 1" Tii/^i Ii/~iiiiniim 


7 0 


2 2 


0 8 


0 2 


1 c 

15 


oz. 


Ext. rhei pulvis ... . • 








2 2 


0 4 


12 


oz. 


r* Tii/'i milvK 

x^Ai* luci |juivia * ■ ■ • • * 






1 9 


A O 

0 3 


1 1 
i 1 


oz. 


Ejct. rhus. arom. liquidum 








1 A 

I 8 


0 3 


30 


oz. 








4 5 


0 8 


14 


oz. 


Ext. rHus. toxicod. liquidum 








2 0 


0 4 


38 


lb. 


E!xt> ^cntifliisc • . • • ■ « 




I 4 


0 5 


0 1 


0*7 
11 


oz. 


Ext. rutae . . . . 








Jt A 

4 0 


0 9 


66 


lb. 


JlLiAI* gCIIilClllcC [JU1V19 ■ ( • • 




2 5 


0 9 


0 2 


13 


oz. 


Ext. sabal liq. . . 








2 0 


0 4 


54 


lb. 






2 0 


0 7 


0 1 


102 


lb. 


Ext. salicis nigrs liquidum 






3 9 


1 1 


0 2 


26 


lb. 


Ext* gIycyrirhiz8E Iic]uic[um • ■ 




1 0 


0 4 


0 1 


15 


oz. 


Ext. sarss? Jam. simp. » , 








2 3 


0 4 


02 


lb. 


Ext. ^ossypii rscii cort> li^uidum 




3 7 


1 2 


0 2 


13 


oz. 


Ext. sarsac Jam. co. . . 








1 11 


0 4 


93 


lb. 


1^ vl" fTTanati /"a/i ^c\t\ li/iTitriiiTYi 
l-iXL. (glaJlaLl 1 aU> i.UI i* lllJUlUUill 




3 4 


0 11 


0 2 


8 


oz. 


Ext. sciUcB liquidum 








1 2 


0 2 


72. 


lb. 


lAL* gJlllUCllCC lIl^UlULllll ■ • 




2 9 


0 10 


0 2 


93 


11 

lb. 


Ext. senegae liquidum . . 








1 0 


0 2 


21 


lb. 


l_<ALt llCCIllaltJAi CAUl* ■ ■ • • 




0 10 


0 3 


0 1 


36 


lb. 


Ext. sennx liquidum . . 






1 6 


0 6 


0 1 


36 


lb. 


1* vt hnpmatrtv miltna 

j^al* 1 loci 1 ictiu a> puivis ■ ■ ■ • 




1 4 


A e 

0 5 


0 1 


16 


oz. 


Ext. serpentanae Iiq. . . 








2 4 


0 4 


16 


oz. 


r* vt njimampliHiQ ifrti 1 






2 4 


0 4 


20 


oz. 


Ejtt. stramonii foliae 








2 11 


0 6 


72 


lb. 


r* vf nnmnm^liHiQ lii^iiiriiim 
l^AX* llaillclIllCllUla lll^UlUUlii < • 


9 0 


2 7 


0 9 


0 2 


33 


oz. 


Ext. stramonii sem. 








4 10 


0 S 


1 1 

XL 


oz. 


r" vt r\fil lof~i<^v* mo 

iZ<AL> llCllCUUl • 111}$> ■ • • ■ 






1 A 

1 9 


0 3 


24 


oz. 


Ext. strophantHi 


c 






3 6 


0 6 


79 






9s. 


for 


3 


tubes 


30 


oz. 


Exta sumbul 




— 






0 8 




lb. 


Ext. hepat. hq. . . 




6 0 






54 


lb. 


Ext. taraxflci 






2 0 


0 7 


0 1 


75 


oz. 


Elxt. hydrastis siccum . . C 








1 7 


66 


lb. 


Ext. taraxaci pulvis . , 






2 5 


0 10 


0 2 


21 


oz. 


Ext. Hydrastis liquidum C 


— 


— 


3 1 


0 6 


6 


oz. 


Ext. uvac ursi liq« 




— 




0 11 


0 2 


[I 


oz. 


Ext. hyoscyam. liq. 






1 9 


0 3 


18 


oz. 


Ext. vaicnanas pulvis . . 








2 8 


0 S 


18 


oz. 


r* vt nif r\cj*tra m 1 ci/^/'iim t 

i^Ai. iiyuocyaiiii sicvuiii \* 






2 8 


0 5 


39 


oz. 


Ext. vibumi prunifolii . . 




— _. 


■ 


5 9 


1 10 


JO 


oz. 


r* vt Kvrtc<^T7ijmi vtT'iriio rMiluio \ 

iJiAi* liyubuyaxiii VII 1U13 jjuivi9 






2 11 


0 5 


102 


lb. 


Ext. viburni liquidum . * 




_ 


3 8 


1 0 


0 2 


1 1\ 

19 


oz. 


H vt I rtAf'ttfi mn lii^niHiim ■ i 
i-<Aia i}Jci.^Luaiiiiur iit.juiuuiii \r 






2 10 


0 5 


















15 
\\ 


oz. 
oz. 
lb. 


n vt iririic ci/'r' H H f 

JJ^Al. 1I1U19 alCC> U>i .V^* • • a • 

l^Al> JaL/UIallUI • • > • • • 

vt larv/^fnnrti \\rt 
l_.Al. JctUOIatlUl 11CJ> ■ • • • 




3 0 


2 3 

3 1 

0 10 


0 4 
0 6 
0 2 


















10 

!2 

:o 


oz. 
lb. 


r* vf lalaT^^ r\iil\/io 

p vt KflVflp liniiiriiim 

i_iAL> ivavac. iiLjLiiuuiii ■ • • • 


~~ 


4 8 


3 3 
1 4 


0 6 

0 3 






F 












If 
)i 


It 

lb.. 


p vt ImlnfK IiniiiHiim 

1_<AI> AUloC IlLJUlUUllI ■ • • • 


~ 


2 11 


A 1 -f 

0 11 


0 2 


30 


lb. 


Eeliling 3 solution No. 1 






1 6 


0 5 


— 


n 

[2 


oz. 


p vt Kritm^riflp milvitt 

' ■* ' - IviaillClIQC IJU1V13 ( • at 






3 3 


0 6 


30 


lb. 


Fehling's solution No. 2 






1 6 


0 5 


— 


7 


oz. 


p vt \ikf^\\\fin r\iili7ia 

l_<AL* la^lULxc [.>U1VI9 • • * ■ 






2 2 


0 5 


















|8 


oz. 


E<xt< lupuli pulvis • • « • 






2 8 


0 5 


















10 


lb. 


p vt ma Iti 


1 4 
























4 


lb. 


Kvt malfi fpTratiim 


1 10 


0 7 




■ 


21 


oz. 


Fern albuminas 








3 1 


0 6 


'6 


lb. 


p vt TT»aIfi /* /"nc/^a^ con ^i/rrt 
l_iAl> lllalll C> (.xlaual* oU{g> W}^1> • • 


3 3 


1 0 






„ 26 


lb. 


Fern alum. pur. . a 




3 3 


1 0 


0 4 


— 


!i 1 


lb. 


p vt nnalti c cl\7*^<»f/^nhf\<i \xxct\ 
LlaAL* lllalll \,t giyLCIUpiIU3> WgL. 


2 8 


0 11 






8 


oz. 


Fern arsenas • . 


B 




■ 


1 2 


0 2 


M 

r 


lb. 


p vt malhi p nsPmr^cTlrtriirt \*fCTt 
I_jAI* li latLl ^. IlcclllUglUUIlI* W^La 


3 0 


1 0 






56 


oz. 


Fern cacodylas . . . . 


B 






— 


1 4 


2 


lb. 


p vt mAlti c* nvnnnnncnK wot 


2 9 


1 0 






18 


lb. 


pprn fnrKnrin^ Qflppnai*fttiiQ 




2 3 


0 8 


0 3 


— 


r 


lb. 


p vt malti f f\! mrtrrK K r C 

l_lAl> IIICULI \,, \Jk» lIiUlIll> kJmh 


1 6 








8 


oz. 


Ferri citras 








1 2 


0 2 




doz. 


p vt mnlti p mrtrfn ntrl 
l_aAl> lllalll uicu illUIIll* |JlvU* 


1 6 




2-i!). 


2 6 


37 


lb. 


Ferri et ammonii citras 






1 5 


0 5 


0 1 


4 


lb. 


p vt mnlti p c\7^ i*\rtf^s e*t\ 

ILtjhXt lllalll L.> Oyia Ida ^IlUSa UJa 










56 


lb. 


Fern et ammomi citras vir. 






2 0 


0 7 


0 1 






Wgt. . . a a . • .a 


1 10 


0 7 






6 


oz. 


Ferri et ammonii tartras 






— 


0 11 


0 2 


6 


lb. 


p vt malti iTniiiriiinn 


2 8 


1 0 


0 3 


— 


16 


oz. 


Ferri et bismuthi citras 








2 4 


0 4 


7 


lb. 


£xta m^ltl IlC]t C* C&SC* S3ga a a 




1 3 


0 5 


— 


1 1 


oz. 


Ferri et mangan. citras 






— 


1 8 


0 3 




lb. 


p vt maiti \m p tTMrPofrti^h i 
J_<aL* IllalLl 1|LJ> \— giyUCIUpila \r 


4 3 


1 4 


0 5 


— 


" 10 


oz. 


Ferri et mang. phosphas 








1 6 


0 3 


7 


lb. 


Ext* mflltl llCJi C> KoCmOglolSa a a 


3 6 


1 2 


0 4 


— 


6 


oz. 


Ferri et potassii tartrcis 








0 11 


0 2 




lb. 


p vt rT^all*! p r4X^r^rtr\nrte i 

i.:«Ai> iiiaiLi \\\\t c> iiyjjupiiusa \* 


3 9 


1 2 


0 4 


— 


19 


oz. 


Ferri et quininae citras . . 








2 10 


0 5 




lb. 


p vt ma Iti 1 1 n f gvt" p Jict 


3 6 


1 1 


0 4 


— 


30 


oz. 


Ferri et quin. cit. c. slrych. 


B 


— 


— 


4 1 


0 7 




lb. 


Elxt. mslti lic^. c.syr* fcrnphoSa co« 


2 9 


0 11 


0 3 


— 


14 


oz. 


Ferri et strych. citras . . 


B 


— 


— 


1 9 


0 3 




II 

lb. 


Elxt> msrut)!! liQuiclurni ■ ■ • • 




2 7 


0 9 


0 2 


12 


oz. 


Ferri glycerophosphatis pulvis. . 






1 9 


0 3 




oz. 


p vt rviafipj¥» Iin 






2 0 


0 4 


13 


oz. 


Ferri hypophosphis 








1 11 


0 4 




lb. 


p vt m^rii 1 1 1^ ninrfv^ linmriii m 

l-iAla JllCviUllcC lULIlOC IILJUJUUIII a a 




2 3 


0 8 


0 2 


18 


oz. 


Ferri iodidum . . 






— 


2 8 


0 5 




oz. 


Ext* nucis vomicffi siccum Q 






1 6 


0 3 


10 


oz. 


Ferri lactas 








1 6 


0 3 




lb. 


Ext. nucis vomicfc lic^uidum 3 






n s 

U 0 


U Z 


t Q 

Io 


oz. 


Ferri lactophosphas 










0 0 




lb. 


Ext. opii liquidum , a B, f 




2 2 


0 8 


0 2 


11 


lb. 


Ferri limat. 




1 5 


0 6 


0 2 




5 


oz. 


Ext. opii siccum , , B, f 








1 4 


30 


lb. 








1 2 


0 4 




\ 


lb. 


Ext. papaveris liquidum C 




2 0 


0 7 


0 1 


48 


lb. 


Ferri oleas 






2 0 


0 7 


0 1 


I 


lb. 


Ext. pareirae liquidum . , 




2 7 


0 9 


0 2 


4 


oz. 


Ferri oxalas (ferric) 








0 7 


0 1 




oz. 


Ext. physostigmatis 






7 5 


1 1 


12 


lb. 


Ferri oxidum preecipitatum 










\ 


oz. 


Ext, picrorhizae liquidum 






2 0 


0 4 










1 6 


0 6 


0 2 




) 


oz. 


Elxt. pini canadensis liquidum . . 






1 4 


0 3 


30 


lb. 


Ferri oxidum sacch. B.P.C. 






1 2 


0 4 




; 


lb. 


Ext. pini (for baths) 


2 9 


0 10 


0 3 




12 


lb. 


Ferri perchloridum cryst. 




1 9 


0 5 


0 2 





12 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



October 5, 193! 



Coit 



Fe-Gl 



i. 


per 


Ferrum — (cont.) 


33 


tb. 


Ferri phosphas saccharatus 


5 


oz. 


Ferri phosphas solubilis 


7 


oz. 


Ferri pyrophosphas 


14 


oz. 


Ferri salicylas 


15 


oz. 


Ferri succinas . . 


7 


lb. 


Ferri sulphas pur. 


7 


lb. 


Ferri sulphas pur. granulatus . 


14 


lb. 


Ferri sulphas exsiccatus 


4 


lb. 


Ferri sulphas coml 


8 


lb. 


Ferri sulphidum (cake) 


16 


oz. 


Ferri valerianas . . 


16 


oz. 


Ferrier's snuff P.L.F. . . B, F 


31.5 


8oz. 


Ferro-malt (Crookes) . . 


36 


8 oz. 


Ferro-malt glycerophos. C 


43 


oz. 


Ferropyrin 


6 


oz. 


Ferrum redactum 


2! 


oz. 


Fluorescein technical . . 


36 


oz. 


Fluorescein solubile 


17 


lb. 


Fceniculi pulvis . . 


15 


lb. 


Foeniculi pulvis (coarse) 


8 


lb. 


Foenugreci sem. pulvis . . 


7 


lb. 


Foenugreci sem. pulvis (crs.) . . 


570 


cwt. 


Foenugreci sem. pulvis (crs.) . . 


16 


oz. 


Formamol 


10 


3 oz. 


Formolyptol, unstd 


22 


lb. 


Foot powder, antisep. P.L.F. . . 


8 


lb 


Foot-rot paste P.L.F 


74 


lb. 


Foot-rot powder P.L.F. 


54 


lb. 


Frosting. . . 


26 


oz. 


Fuchsinum -pur. 


5 


lb. 


Fuller's earth 


6 


lb. 


Fuller's earth pulvis 


7 


lb. 


Fuller's earth levig 


7 


lb. 


Fuller's earth levig. alb. 






G 


32 


oz. 




12 


lb. 


Galangalae rhizoma 


7 


oz. 




27 


lb. 




36 


lb.' 


Gallae cserul. pulvis 


18 


25 




72 


lb. 


Gelatinum sheet No. I 


84 


lb. 


Geiatinum incisum 


902 


lb. 


Gelatum codeines et glyc. P.L.F. 


20 


lb. 


Getatum zinci . . 


30 


lb. 


Gelat. zinci dur. P.L.F. 


18 


gr- 


Gelseminee hydrochloridum B 


15 


lb. 


Gentians rad. incis. 


17 


lb. 


Gentianab rad. pulvis . . 


598 




Geniianae rad. pulvis (crs.) 


18 


oz. 




20 


oz. 


Geraniol acetas 


22 


oz. 


Gingerin. (African) 


54 


oz. 


Gingerin. (Jam.) 


7 


Jb. 


Glucosum (hq.) . . . . wgt. 


8 


lb. 


Giucosum (solid) 


2 


lb. 


Glucosum pulv. 


36 


lb. 


Glue, surg. (Sinclair) r.L.r. . . 






Glycerina 


[78 


lb. 


Glycerin bismuth carb. 


50 


lb. 


Glycerin pepsin fort. 


20 


lb. 


Glycerin phenolis 


12 


lb. 


Glycennum 


12 


lb. 


Glycerinum (wgt.) 


22 


lb. 


Glyc. acidi bond 



Selling Price 



16 oz. 
s. d. 


4 oz. 

5. d. 


1 oz. 

>. d. 


1 dr. 
.. d. 




d. 


per 


— 


1 3 


0 5 


— 


jO 


10. 


— 


— 


0 11 


0 2 


oD 


R 

0 OZ. 


— 


— 


1 1 


0 2 


9ft 


Ik 

ID. 


— 


— 


2 0 


0 4 


74 


Ik 
ID. 


■ — • 


— 


2 3 


0 4 


X\ 
JJ 


Ik 
ID. 


0 11 


0 3 


0 1 


— 




Ik 
ID. 


0 11 


0 3 


0 1 


— 




Ik 

ib. 


1 9 


0 7 


0 2 


— 




Ik 
lb. 


0 6 


0 2 


— 


— 


1 A 
10 


Ik 
lb. 


1 0 


0 4 


0 2 


— 


79 


Ik 
lb. 


— 


— 


2 4 


0 4 


9ft 


Ik 
tb. 


— 


— 


2 6 


0 6 




Ik 
lb. 


— 


2 0 


0 6 


— 


9A 


Ik 
lb. 


— 


2 3 


0 7 


0 1 


1 *r 


Ik 
lb. 


— 


— 


— 


1 0 




Ik 
lb. 


— 


— 


0 11 


0 2 


94 


Ik 
lb. 


— 


— 


3 1 


0 6 


0 


oz. 


— 


— 


5 3 


0 9 


cr 
J \ 


Ik 
lb. 


2 2 


0 7 


0 2 


— 


On 


Ik 
lb. 


1 10 


0 7 


0 2 


— 


X} 
JL 


Ik 
lb. 


1 0 


0 3 


— 


— 


7A 


Ik 
lb. 


0 11 


0 3 


— 


— 


1 1 
1 1 


Ik 
lb. 


0 9 


— 


7 lb. 


4 6 


"id 


Ik 
lb. 


— 


— 


2 4 


0 4 






— 


— 


0 5 


— 




oz. 


2 9 


1 0 


0 4 


— 


JJ 


Ik 
lb. 


1 0 


0 4 


— 


— 


94 


Ik 
lb. 


9 3 


2 6 


— 


— 


I 9 


Ik 
lb. 


6 9 


2 0 


0 7 


— 


9R 
^o 


Ik 
lb. 


— 


— 


3 9 


0 7 


in 


Ik 

lb. 


0 8 


0 3 


— 


— 


■^An 
j\xj 


cwt. 


0 9 


0 3 


. — 


— 


1 A 
10 


oz. 


0 11 


0 4 


— 


— 


J'l 


Ik 
lb. 


0 11 


0 4 


— 


— 


91 


Ik 
lb. 










17 
1 / 


Ik 
lb. 










97 
LI 


Ik 
Id. 










V\ 
JJ 


n oz. 


— 


— 


4 8 


0 8 


7 


Ik 
lb. 


1 8 


0 6 


0 2 


— 


J 


oz. 


— 


— 


1 2 


0 2 


20 


oz. 


3 6 


1 0 


0 4 




1R 


oz. 


4 6 


1 4 


0 5 


— 


^n 


oz. 


per 


hot. 


2 6 


— 


1Q 

ly 


oz. 


8 6 


2 5 


0 8 


— 


40 


oz. 


10 6 


3 0 


0 10 


— 


lUo 


oz. 


— 


3 9 


1 0 


— 


Q 

0 


oz. 


2 6 


0 9 


— 


— 


Q 


oz. 


3 9 


1 2 


— 


— 






per 


gr. 


2 8 


— 






2 0 


0 7 


0 2 


— 






2 3 


0 8 


0 3 


— 


o 
0 


Ik 
lb. 


71b. 


4 8 


141b. 


9 0 


1 

\j 


Ik 
lb. 


— 


— 


2 8 


0 5 


ly 


dr. 


— 


— 


3 0 


0 6 


Q 

0 


oz. 


— 


— 


3 3 


0 6 


OA 

yu 


lb. 


— 


— 


7 11 


1 2 


ii.o 


1 A 

lUc.c. 


1 0 


0 4 


0 2 


— 


ii.j 


DOXZ!) 


1 0 


0 4 


0 2 


— 




doz. 


1 6 


0 6 


0 2 


— 




oz. 


4 6 


1 2 


— 


— 


30 


lOv. 










14 


oz. 










22 


lb. 




4 0 


1 1 


0 2 


4fJ 


oz. 




2 7 


0 9 


0 2 


14 


lb. 




1 2 


0 4 


0 1 


17 


lb. 


2 1 


0 7 


0 3 




18 


oz. 


1 6 


0 6 






18 


oz. 


3 6 


1 0 


0 4 




5 


oz. 



Cost 



Gl— He 

Glycerina — (cont.) 



fl. F 
C 



Glyc. acidi gallici 
Glyc. ac. pepsin (Bullock) 
Glyc. acidi tannici 
Glyc. aluminis . . 
Glyc. amyli 
Glyc. atropine . . 
Glyc. bellad. 50 per cent. 
Glyc. bellad. . . 
Qyc. boracis 
Glyc carminini B.P.C 
Glyc. diamorphinae B.P.C. 
Glyc. Eastoni 
Glyc. et cucum. 
Glyc. et aqua rosas 1 in 3 
Glyc. glycerophosphatum co. 
Glyc. ichthamoi. 
Glyc. iodi B.P.C 
Glyc. pancreatini 
Glyc. papain! 
Glyc. pepsini 
Glyc. plumbi subacetatis 
Glyc. thymolis co. 
Glyc. tragacanthse 



Glycine 

Glycothymoline, unstd. 
Glycyrrhizae radix decort. 
Glycyrrhizae radicis pulvis 
Glycyrrhizae ladicis decort. pulv. 
Glycyrrhizffi radicis pulvis (crs.) 
Glycyrrhizae radicis pulvis (crs.) 
Clycyrrhizinum ammoniatum . , 
Gossypii radicis cort. pulvis . . 
Gran, paradisi pulv. 
Granati cortex . . . . 
Granati radicis cortex . . 
Grindeline (Oppenheimer) 
Guaiaci ligni rass. 
Guaiaci resinee pulvis . . 
Guaiacol (cryst.) 
Guaiacol 

GuaiacoL benzoas 
Guaiacol. carbonas 
Guaiacol. cinnamas - . . 
Guaiacol. salicylas 

Guaranae pulvis 

Guttae fluorescins B.P.C. 



H 

Haematox. lignum inds. 
Haematox.- ligni pulvis .. 
Hasmatoxylinum 
Hxmoglobini pulvis 
Haemorrhaline (Hewlett) 
Halibut liver oil 
Haliverol capsules ni.3 P.D. 
Haliverol (P.D. & Co.) 
Hamamelinum . . 
Hebaral sodium P.D. gr. 3 
Heliotropin. cryst. 
Hellebori nigri radicis pulvis 
Helmitol . . 
Hennae folia 
Hennae fol. pulvis 
Hexamin benzoas. 
Hexamin salicylas 
Hexamina 



Selling Pries 



16 oz 
.. d. 


4 oz 

1. d. 


1 oz 

i. I 


1 

>. 


— 


1 9 


0 6 


0 


— 


6 0 


1 7 


0 


— 


1 5 


0 5 


0 


— 


1 2 


0 4 


- 


— 


1 3 


0 5 


- 


— 


2 6 


0 8 


- 


10 2 


2 6 


0 9 


- 


— 


2 8 


0 9 


- 


— 


0 11 


0 3 


- 


— 


3 11 


1 2 


- 


— 


1 9 


0 6 


- 


— 


1 9 


0 6 


0 


— 


1 0 


0 4 


- 


2 0 


0 7 


0 2 


- 


— 


1 5 


0 5 






1 3 


0 5 


A 
u 


— 




1 9 




— 


1 9 


0 7 


0 


— 


3 6 


1 0 


0 


— 


1 6 


0 5 


0 


— 


1 6 


0 6 


0 


1 6 


0 6 


0 2 


- 


— 


1 10 


0 7 


0 


— 


— 


4 5 


0 


— 


1 3 


0 4 


- 


3 0 


1 0 


0 4 


- 


1 6 


0 6 


0 2 


- 


3 6 


1 0 


0 4 


- 


1 3 


0 5 


0 2 


- 


7 lb. 


4 2 


141b. 


7 


— 


— 


2 4 


0 


— 


2 0 


0 7 


- 


2 8 


0 9 


0 3 


- 


— 


0 8 


0 3 


- 


— 


1 0 


0 4 






4 4 


1 2 


n 

V 


0 11 


0 4 


0 1 








0 9 


0 


— 


— 


3 0 


0 






A 0 


u 


— 


— 


4 5 


0 






2 10 


0 


— 


— 


7 0 


1 


— 
— 


— 
— 


— 
1 2 


2 
0 


— 


— 


1 4 


0 


1 0 


0 4 


0 1 


- 


1 8 


0 7 


0 2 


- 


— 


— 


— 


2 


— 




1 2 


0 






n 11 

U 11 


n 
U 


4 0 


each 






4 0 


each 


— 


- 


— 


— 


5 c.c 


3 


— 


— 


3 1 


0 


3 3 


each 


— 


- 






2 0 


0 


2 9 


0 10 


0 3 




1 9 


0 7 


0 2 


tt! 


2 3 


0 8 


0 3 








2 8 


0 






2 8 


0 






0 9 


0 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



13 



Cost 



oz. 
oz. 
doz. 
gr. 
gr- 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
100 



oz. 
oz. 

lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

oz. 

lb. 
lb. 

oz. 

lb. 

oz. 

lb. 
lb. 

oz. 
oz. 

lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

gr. 

gr. 
16 oz. 
16 oz. 

lb. 

gr. 

lb. 

gr. 

gr. 



oz. 
30 

lb. 

lb. 

lb. 
amp. 
amp. 

lb. 



oz. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 



He— In 



Hexamina resorcin. 
Hexamin. sodii acet. 
Hirudines 
Homatropina 
Homatrop. hydrobrom. 
Hoof ointment P.L.F. I. 
Hoof ointment P.L.F. II. 
Hordeum perlatum 
Hormotone tablets 

Hydrargyrum 



Hyd. bisulph. (vermilion) 
Hyd. bromidum 
Hyd. cyanidum . . 
Hyd. iodidum flavum . . 
Hyd. iodidum rubrum . . 
Hyd. iodidum viride 
Hyd. oleas 

Hyd. oxidum flavum . . 
Hyd. oxidum rubrum . . 
Hyd. oxycyanidum 
Hyd. perchloridum 
Hyd. persulphas (alb.) 
Hyd. salicylas 
Hyd. subchioridum 
Hyd. subchl. preec. subtil. 
Hyd. subsulphas flavus 
Hyd. sulphuretum c. sulphi 
Hyd. suiphocyanidum . . 
Hyd. tannas 

Hydrargyrum . . . . 
Hyd. ammoniatum ■ . . 
Hyd. cum creta . . 
Hydrastina 

Hydrastininae hydrochlor. 
Hydrated bismuth (P.D.) 
Hydrated magnesia (P.D.) 
Hydroquinone . . 
Hyoscinae hydrobrom. . . 
Hyoscyami semina 
Hyoscyamina cryst. 
Hyoscyammae sulphas . . 



I 



Ichthalbin 

Ichthalbin tablets gr. 5 
Ichthammol 

Ichthyocoila Brazil, incis. 
Ichthyol . . 
Icoral 0.5% . . 
Icoral 5 0% . . 
Incense P.L F. . . 
Indicarminum .. 
Indigo synthetic 
Indigo (carmine dry) . . 
Indigo (carmine paste) . . 
Indigo sulphatis sol. 
Infusa recenta . . 



Infusa Concentrata 1 — 7 

Inf. agropyri cone. . . 
Inf. anthemidis cone. . . 





Selline Price 


Cost 


In — Ir 

Infuta — (cont.) 


Sellins Price 




























16 oz. 
J. </. 


4 oz. 
J. d. 


1 oz. 

s. d. 


1 ar. 

t. d. 


J. 


per 


16 oz. 
<. d. 


4 oz. 
]. d. 


1 

1. 


oz. 
d. 


I dr. 
s. d. 










n fi 

U 0 


91 


lo. 


Inf. amarum cone. 




n 11 

U 11 


A 
U 


A 
4 


A 1 
u 1 








1 Q 
1 9 


n 1 


JO 


Id. 


Infus. aromat co. 




1 R 
1 D 


n 
u 


c 


n 1 
U I 




ea. 


1 9 
1 it 






JO 


lU 
ID. 


Inf. aurantii cone. 




1 A 
1 4 


n 
u 


3 


n 1 
u 1 


B 


per 


gr. 


n Q 




jO 


Ik 

lb. 


Inf. aurantii co. cone. . . 




1 A 
1 4 


n 
u 


e 

9 


n 1 

U 1 


B 


per 


gr. 


n Q 




J7 


Ik 
Id. 


Inf. buchu cone. 




1 1 
1 0 


n 


e 
u 


n 1 

U 1 




9 Q 










Ik 

ID* 


Inf. calumbae cone. 




1 n 

1 u 


n 


A 

** 


n 1 

U 1 




9 B 
£ o 








1.1 


Ik 
ID. 


Inf. caryophylli cone. . . 




1 n 

1 u 


A 

u 


A 

4 . 


n 1 

U 1 




U o 


fl t 
U o 


n 1 




OU 


Ik 
ID. 


Inf. cascarillae cone. 




9 9 

z z 


A 
U 


7 


n 1 

U 1 




per 


doz. 


1 T 

1 o 




*tJ 


IK 
ID. 


Inf. catechu cone. 




1 B 

1 0 




7 


n 1 

V I 












JU 


Ik 
ID. 


Inf. chiratae cone. 




1 >; 

1 u 


n 


e 

9 


n 1 

U 1 














Ik 
10. 


Inf. cinchonas acid. cone. 




1 7 
1 / 


A 
U 


7 
1 


n 1 

U 1 












4^ 


Ik 

lb. 


Inf. cinchonas flav. cone. 




1 in 

1 lU 


n 


7 


n 1 

U 1 




90 R 


C 11 
□ 11 


1 Q 
1 Sf 




OU 


Ik 
ID. 


Inf. cinchonas pallid, cone. 




9 9 

z z 


A 

u 


7 
f 


n 1 

U . 1 




19 Q 


1 n 
o o 


1 n 
1 u 




4^ 


Ik 
ID. 


Inf. cuspariae cone. 




1 9 
1 9 


n 


R 
u 


n 1 

U 1 








9 n 


n A 

U 4 


4'1 
nj 


Ik 
ID. 


Inf. dulcamaras cone. . . 




1 B 
1 o 


n 


c 

D 


n 1 

U 1 


B 






? R 


n R 


07 


Ik 
ID. 


Inf. ergotas cone. . . B 




9 R 
Z D 


A 

u 


A 
9 


n 9 
u z 


C 






9 in 

£i lU 


U 3 


9'i 


Ik 
ID. 


Inf. gentianas (simp.) cone. 




1 n 

1 u 


n 


A 

Hk 


n 1 

U 1 


C 






9 t 


U 4 


JU 


Ik 
ID. 


Inf. gentianas co. cone. 




1 1 


A 

u 


A 
4 


n 1 

U 1 








9 S 


n K 




Ik 
ID. 


Inf. jaborandi cone. . . C 




1 O 


n 


R 
0 


n 1 

U 1 






f n 


n 7 


n 1 

U 1 


jj 


Ik 
ID. 


Inf. kramerias cone. 




1 A 
1 4 


n 
u 


c 

9 


n 1 

U 1 


c 






1 9 
1 iS 


n 9 


JO 


Ik 
ID. 


Inf. lupuli cone. 




9 n 


n 
u 


7 


n 1 

U 1 


c 






1 9 
1 t} 




44 


Ik 
iD. 


Inf. marubii cone. 




1 Q 

1 9 


n 
u 


R 




B 






9 B 


n i: 

U 9 


41 


Ik 
10. 


Inf. maticas cone. 




1 in 


n 


7 


n 1 

U 1 


B 






1 n 
1 U 


n 9 
u z 


4/1 


Ik 
ID. 


Inf. pruni serot. cone. . . C 




1 i; 

1 3 


n 


IR 
0 


A 1 






i 1 
4 1 


1 1 


n 9 
u z 


91 


Ik 
ID. 


Inf. qucissias cone. 




n in 


n 


o 
0 


n 1 




— 




3 3 


0 6 


38 


lb. 


Inf. ihei cone. . . 


— 


1 6 


0 


6 


0 1 








1 1 


n 9 




Ik 
ID. 


Inf. rosae acidum cone. 




1 Q 

1 if 


n 
u 


e 
9 


n 1 

U 1 












^0 
j\i 


IK 

ID. 


Inf. scoparii cone. 




1 1 

A 1 


0 


5 


n 1 

U 1 




— 


5 2 


1 6 


0 3 


38 


lb. 


Inf. senegae cone. 


— 


1 5 


0 


5 


0 1 






4 U 


1 1 


n 9 
u z 


jO 


Ik 
lb. 


Inf. sennas cone. 




1 A 
1 4 


n 


C 

0 


A 1 

U 1 


C 






9 B 


n >; 


DO 


IK 

ID. 


Inf. serpentaria: cone. . . 




9 7 


0 


9 


n 9 
u z 








tJ 3 


n 7 


nj 


Ik 
10. 


Inf. simarubas cone. 




1 B 


0 


6 


n 1 

U 1 




in n 


9 in 


n Q 




jj 


Ik 
10. 


Inf. uvae ursi cone. 




1 9 


0 


4 


n 1 

U 1 


C 




IL n 

4 U 
1 c 


1 1 
1 1 

n >; 


n 9 
u z 

ft 1 


Ji. 


Ik 
ID. 


Inf. Valerianae cone. 




1 9 
1 Z 


0 


4 


n 1 


B 


per 


gr. 


1 9 
1 




















B 


per 


gr. 

9 ? 


1 9 

1 it 

n Q 


n 9 
u z 






Injectiones 














9 R 


1 n 
1 u 


A 9 




Lj 


OZ. 


Inject, apomorphinae hypod. C 






3 10 


A 1 

0 7 






*> Q 


A A 


A O 

u z 


Q9 


oz. 


Inject, cocainae hypod. . . S. F 






4 


8 


A O 


B 


per 


gr. 


1 z 




4o 


oz. 


Inject, coc. hyp. (10%).. B. F 






7 


0 


1 A 

1 u 






1 n 
1 u 


n j1 

U 4 




99 
Zo 


oz. 


Inject, morphinae hypod. B, F 






5 


0 


n 0 

U 9 


B 


per 


gr. 


A 1 A 

U ID 




L 
0 


oz. 


Inject, strychninae hypod. B 






1 


0 


A t 

u z 


B 


per 


gr. 


A 1 A 

U lU 






























^9 


IL 

lb. 


Insect powder (Dalm.) . . 


A n 

4 U 


1 9 
1 Z 


0 


4 














99 
Li 


Ik 
lb. 


Insect powder see. 


9 Q 
Z U 


n Q 

U 9 


0 


3 














XJ.J 


ea. 




orig. 


bot. 


1 


6 














Z3.J 


ea. 


Insuhn . . . . . . 10 c.c. 


orig. 


L i. 

bot. 


2 10 












1 A 


ZO 


lb. 


Inulte radicis pulvis 


t 0 


1 o 
1 Z 


0 


4 






doz. 


I I, 






z4 


IL 

lb. 


Inulas radicis pulvis (ers.) 


Q c 
<I 0 


1 U 


0 


4 








1 c 


A R 


A 1 

U 1 


11 


oz. 








4 


0 


A 

0 7 




a n 


9 7 


A Q - 
U 9 


A O 

u z 


1 J 


oz. 


lodato! 10% 






2 


0 


A C 
U 5 








1 O 
1 Z 


A 

u z 


iO 


oz. 


lodatol 25% 






3 


9 


A O 

U 9 




U lU 


per 


amp. 




OA 


lb. 


Iodine, alcoholic sol. (Factory) 




9 1 A 
Z lU 


0 


9 






1 n 
1 u 


per 


amp. 




t 1 7 
1 1/ 


1 AA 
lUU 


lodipin 10% 










A A 
U 9 




D 3 


1 in 

1 lU 








gm. 




















ft A 


1 A 

1 u 


96 


oz. 












O A 

2 4 








i i 


A C 

U D 


13 


oz. 


lodoformum 






2 


0 


0 4 








i D 


A C 

U 0 


1 no 


lb. 


Iodoform varnish (Whitehead's) 




A A 

4 U 


1 


3 








1 6 


0 5 




54 


20 


lodothyrine tablets gr. 3 


doz. 


4 0 












1 5 


0 5 




10 


oz. 


lodum resubl. . . 






1 


6 


0 3 




1 6 


0 6 


0 2 




38 


oz. 


lononum 10% .. 






5 


7 


0 10 












14 


oz. 


Ipecac, pulverata 






2 


0 


0 4 












150 


lb. 


Ipecac, rad. (Rio) pulvis 




5 4 


1 


6 














16 


lb. 


Iridis rad. flor. . . 




0 7 


0 


2 














108 


lb. 


Iridis rad. flor. trimmed 




4 0 


1 


1 








1 5 


0 5 


0 1 


20 


lb. 


Iridis rad flor. pulv. 


2 6 


0 9 


0 


3 








1 10 


0 7 


0 1 


122 


lb. 


Iridis rad. flor. (fingers) 




4 4 


1 


2 





14 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



October 5, 1935 



Cost 


Ja — Li 


Sallins Price 


Cost 


Li 


Selling Price || 


i 
































16 oz. 


4 oz. 


t oz. 


1 dr. 






16 oz. 


4 oz. 


1 oz. 


1 dt. 




d. 


per 




t. d. 


t. d. 




>. d. 


d. 


per 




t. d. 


s. d. 


t. d. 


I. i. 




















lb 
ID. 


Linctus tussi P.L.F. . . C 


■) n 

«l u 


1 6 

X D 






f 






J 










480 
6 


cwt. 

lb. 


Lini semina 

Lini semina Ang. sifted 


71b. 
0 11 


3 6 
0 4 


141b. 


7 0 


!l 
III 


18 


lb. 


Jaborandi fol. (P. microph.) . . 


_ 


0 8 


0 3 




396 


cwt. 


Lini semina contusa E.I. 


71b. 


3 0 


141b. 


5 6 


n 


5U 


Ik 
lb. 


Jalap, pulverata . . 




1 s 




A 1 

U 1 


J.J 


Ik 
lb. 


Lini semina contusa 


n Q 


n 9 






\i 


•20 

jO 


oz. 


Jalapae resinae pulvis 






R 7 


A 1A 




Ik 
lb. 


Lini sem. farina (sine oleo) 


n Q 


n 9 







li 


AR 
•TO 


oz. 


Jalapin 








1 n 
1 u 
















) ft 


0 

7 


Ik 

ID. 


Juniper! fructus 


1 9 
1 £ 


n A. 


ft 9 








1 jnimpntn 










1 1 


to 


Ik 

ID. 


Juniperi fructus contus. 
K 


9 ^ 
it D 


n Q 


ft '4 




70 

jy 
in? 


Ik 

ID. 

Ik 
ID. 

Ik 

lb. 

Ik 
lb. 


Lin. A.B.C B 

Lin. A.B.C. meth. . . B 
Lin. aconiti . . . . B 
Lin. aconiti co. meth. N.I.F. B 




X w 

9 9 


n 11 

fl ■< 

U v 

ft Q 
U 9 

ft R 


0 2 
0 1 

0 2 1 

— 


ilk 
ill 
11 
11 
















Li. 


Ik 
ID. 


Lin. aconiti meth. . . £ 




n ft 


fl 9 


— 


il 


5 


Ik 
ID. 


Kainit 


U o 


n 

U o 






J^ 


Ik 
lb. 


Lin. aeruginis P.L.F. . . 




1 9 
1 o 


n 4 


— 


il 


c 

J 


OZ. 


Kamala (sifted) . . . . . . 






ft Q 




I^ 
ID 


Ik 
lb. 


Lin. album (acetic) 


2 n 

Lt V 


n 7 


n 2 

U Li 


— 


II 


1Q 
lb 


Ik 

lb. 


Kaolinum puriss. 


^ o 




ft 9 




I!? 


Ik 
lb. 


Lin. album (eunmon.) . . 




n 7 


fl 2 

V ci 


— 


II 


II 


lb. 


Kaolinum pur. pulvis . . 


1 5 


0 5 


1 1 


— 


32 


lb. 


Lin. album cone 


4 0 


1 2 


0 4 




\i 


6 


lb. 


Kaolinum coml. pulvis opt. 


n o 


A 9 






91 
Zl 


lb. 


Lin. anodyn. 




fl in 


ft ? 


— 


w 


68 


dr. 


Kerocain 


per 




0 3 


8 6 


15 


lb. 


Lin. album (B.P.C.) . . 


2 0 


0 7 


0 2 




II 


25 




Kerol caps, (intest.) 


doz. 


n Q 
U 9 








Ik 

lb. 


Un. alb. N.H.I 




ft 7 


ft 2 




II 






Kerol caps, (stom.) 


doz. 


n fi 

U 0 








Ik 
lb. 


Lin. ammoniae . . . . £ 




1 5 


0 5 


— 


!l 


Q 
0 


Ik 

lb. 


Kieselguhr (alb.) 


1 n 


U 4 


n ii 




70 


Ik 
lb. 


Lin. belladonnee . . B 




9 9 


fl 11 

U XX 


0 2 


il 


*7 
/ 


Ik 
lb. 


Kieselguhr (grey) 


n 11 


U 4 


n 11 




9S 


Ik 
lb. 


Lin. belladonnae meth. B 




n 11 


0 i 

U 1 


0 1 


H 














19A 


Ik 
lb. 


Lin. betulse co. (Hewlett) 
Lin. calaminae B.P.C. . . 




4 

1 Q 

1 «7 


1 9 

ft R 


— 

r 


il 

11 






L 










IC 
\J 


Ik 
lb. 


Lin. calaminae co. B.P.C. 

Lin. calcis 


A n 
1 in 


ft 7 


ft (t 
u u 

ft 2 


— - 
— 


I 


40 


oz. 


Lactopeptine, unstd. 






R 9 


1 ft 
1 u 


91 


Ik 
lb. 






ft 


ft ? 





il 


70 


Ik 
lb. 


Lactopept. elix., unstd. 


R Q 


9 1 


n 7 


ft 1 

U 1 


7ft 
JO 


Ik 
ID. 


Lin. camph. ammoniatum £ 




2 9 


0 9 


— 


!1 
il 


40 


oz. 


Lactopept. tab. gr. 5, unstd. . . 


doz. 


n in 






91 


Ik 
ID. 


Lin. camph. ammoniatum meth.£ 




ft ^ 


fl 9 


— 


1 7 
1/ 


Ik 
lb. 


Lactosum 


9 9 


n fi 

U o 


n 9 




OA 

70 


Ik 
ID. 


Lin. capsici B.P.C 




3 8 


1 0 


— 


il 


9 


dr. 


Lactucarium 








1 A 
1 4 


JJ 


Ik 

lb. 


Lin. capsici co. meth. . . 




X o 


n 'i 


; 


I 


1 C 

15 


oz. 


Lffivulosum 






9 9 


n A 

U 4 


49 
*tZ 


Ik 
lb. 


Lin. capsici meth. 






u u 


— 


II 


/o 


Ik 
lb. 


Lambing oils P.L.F. 


O M 










IK. 

ID. 


Lin. chloroformi . . . 




2 3 


0 9 


0 2 


1.1 


£4 


"in 


lamellae . . 


^ R 


per 


tube 




I'^9 

1 JL 


Ik 
lb. 


Lin. crotonis . . . . C 




4 9 


1 4 


0 3 


ifc 


36 


Dl) 


Lamella homatropin 


4 D 


per 


tube 




CI 

31 


Ik 

lb. 


Lin. hydrargyri 




9 n 


1 n 

X \) 


0 2 


\i 


6 


Ik 
lb. 


Lapis cariosl pulvis 


n Q 


u o 


n 1 

U 1 




94 
Z4 


oz. 


Lin. menthol 






9 fi 


0 7 


W 


11 


oz. 


Lapis divinus (sticks) . . 






1 <i 

1 0 


n 9 


"in 


Ik 
lb. 


Lin. methyl salicylatis . . 




1 10 


0 6 


0 1 


w 


•7 
/ 


Ik 
lb. 


Lapis Hibern. pulvis . . 


n in 


n A 

U 4 


n 9 




JJ 


Ik 

ID. 


Lin. methyl salicylatis co. 




2 0 


0 7 


0 1 


11 


o 

8 


Ik 
lb. 


Lapis pumicis elect. 


1 n 


n A 

U 4 


n 9 




99 
ZZ 


Ik 
ID. 


Lin. methyl sal. N.H.I. 


— 


0 11 


0 4 


— 




5 


lb. 


Lapis pumicis pulvis . . 


U 0 


n 9 


n 1 

U 1 




ft? 
0/ 


Ik 
ID. 


Lin. opii . . . . B.exF 




3 1 


0 10 


0 2 


1 


7 


lb. 


Lapis pumicis pulvis levig. 


1 U 


n A 
U 4 


A 9 




73 


Ik 
lb. 


Lin. opii ammoniatum B, ex F 




9 R 


1 n 


0 2 


'1 


18 


lb. 


Laricis cortex . . 




n Q 


n 9 




•30 

)y 


Ik 
lb. 


Lin. opii ammon. meth. B, ex F 




1 'i 
X o 


Q ^ 

U V 


— 




30 


It 

lb. 


Laricis corticis pulvis . . 




1 -I 
1 1 


U 4 




yi 


Ik 
lb. 


Lin. opii meth. . . B, ex f 




1 

X o 


U «J 


0 1 


II 


14 


lb. 


Lauri fructus 




U 0 


A 9 




79 


IL 

lb. 


Lin. potasii iodidi B.P.C. 




2 7 


U «7 


0 2 


!l 


1 Q 


Ik 
lb. 


Lauri fructus pulvis 




n fi 


ft 9 




3U 


Ik 

ID. 


Lin. potasii iodidi c. sapone . . 






0 4 


— , 


il 


lUo 


Ik 
lb. 


Lavandulae flores Ang. . . 




A n 

4 U 


1 1 


n 9 


79 

J L 


Ik 
ID. 


Lin. saponis 


1 8 


2 6 


0 8 


— . 


|| 


39 


IL 

lb. 


Lavandulae flores Gall. opt. 


a u 


1 5 


A C 

u a 




14 
I** 


Ik 

lb. 


Lin. saponis meth. 


0 6 


0 2 


— ' 


I 


33 


11 

lb. 


Lavandulae flores Gall. sec. 


A 9 


1 9 

1 S 


A C 




1 A9 
lUZ 


Ik 
lb. 


Lin. sinapis 




3 11 


1 1 


0 2] 


I 


42 


oz. 


Lecithin (ovo) . . 






C 9 


1 n 
1 U 


49 
IZ 


Ik 
lb. 


Lin. sinapis meth. 




1 6 


V U 


— 


il 


36 


lb. 


Leeming's ess. P.L.F. . . 


4 b 


t A 

1 4 






9A 
ZU 


11 

lb. 


Lin. terebinthinae 


2 fi 


ft Q 


ft ^ 


— , ^ 


li 


48 


oz. 


Lenigallol 








1 9 

1 I 


97 
il 


11 

lb. 


Lin. terebinthinse aceticum 


3 4 


1 ft 


ft 4 


— 


I 


10 


oz. 


Leptandrinum 






1 fi 

1 b 


ft 9 


9n 

ZU 


Ik 
lb. 


Lin. universale P.L.F. . . 


3 0 


0 11 


0 3i 


— 


I 


15 


lb. 


Ligroinum 




U b 


A O 


















tl 


72 


lb. 


Limonis cortex sice. Ang. 




Z 7 


A A 


A 9 






Liquores 










i" 


36 


lb. 


Linctus diamorphinas . . B. F 




1 6 


A C 

U b 




1 ^9 

l3z 


II 

lb. 


Liq. actaeae rac. cone. (Hewlett) 




4 9 


1 4 

X 4 


0 si 


' t, 


24 


lb. 


Linctus diamorphin. N.H.I. B, F 




1 ti 
1 U 


A A 




JO 


Ik 
lb. 


Uq. acidi chromici 




1 5 


0 5 


0 1 


■M 


36 


lb. 


Linctus diamorph. camph. 




1 5 


0 D 




1,1 

z4 


11 

lb. 


Liq. acriflavini B.P.C. . . 


9 n 


1 n 

1 u 


fl 4 


— 






B.P.C C. ex F 










9A 
ZU 


oz. 


Liq. adrenalini hydrochloricus . . 






2 11 


0 S ; 




42 


lb. 


Linctus diamorph. c. ipecac. 




1 9 


A 7 
U 7 




9A 
ZU 


11 

lb. 


Liq. eJuminii acetatis . . 


2 6 


0 9 


0 3 




'I 






B.P.C. C, ex F 










21 


lb. 


Liq. alumin. aceto-tart. 


2 8 


0 9 


0 3 






36 


lb. 


Linctus diamorph. et scillae 




1 5 


0 6 




8.5 


lb. 


Liq. ammonias dil. . . E 


1 2 


0 4 


0 1 








B.P.C. C. ex F 










9 


lb. 


Liq. ammonias fort. 0.888 E 


1 2 


0 4 


0 2 






60 


lb. 


Linctus diamorph. et thymi 




2 2 


0 8 


— 


10 


lb. 


Liq. ammoniac fort 0.880 E 


1 3 


0 5 


0 2 


- 








B.P.C. Cexf 










11 


lb. 


Liq. ammonii acetatis dil. 


1 5 


0 5 


0 2 






36 


lb. 


Linctus ethylmorphin. . . 




1 9 


0 4 




15 


lb. 






0 7 


0 2 






22 


lb. 


Linctus scillae (Gee) . . C 


3 0 


0 11 


0 3 




15 


lb. 


Liq. ammon. acet fort. 




0 10 


0 3 






9R 


Ik 

iD. 


Linctus simplex P.L.F. 




1 4 


0 5 




18 


lb. 


Liq. ammon. citratis . . . . 


2 3 


0 9 


0 3 


- 

-% 


1 







October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



15 



Cost 



lb. 
ib. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
oz. 
oz. 

lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

gal. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb.- 
lb. 
pt. 
lb. 
lb. 

lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
Ib. 
lb. 
lb. 
oz. 
25 gm 
oz. 
oz. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
Ib. 

Ib. 

lb. 

lb. 

lb 

lb 

lb. 

lb. 

lb. 

lb. 

lb. 

oz. 

oz. 

Ib. 

oz. 

Ib. 
lb. 
Ib. 
lb. 
Ib. 
Ib. 
Ib. 

oz. 
oz. 
oz. 



Li 

Liquores — (cent.) 




Selling Pric* 




Cost 














16 oz. 
1. d. 


4oz. 

J 

s. a. 


1 

J 

%. a. 


1 dr. 
1. <f. 


J 
a. 


per 


Liq. ammon. citr. fort, (1 to 3) 


— 




U V 


— 


10 


OZ. 


Uq. antimonii chloridi coml. . . 


2 0 






— 


1 J 


OZ* 


Liq. arsenicalis . . . . B 


— 


n 7 


u o 


— 


78 


lb. 


Liq. arsenici brotnat. . . B 


— 


1 £i 


n i 

U *B 


— 


84 


Ib. 


Liq. arsenici hydrochloricus B 


— 




n 1 


— 


758 

irj\> 


lb 


Liq. arten. et hydr. iodid. B 


— 


n 11 

U XI 


n i 


— 


78 


lb. 


Liq. atropinae sulphatis B 


— 




1 Q 


0 4 


101 


lb. 


Liq. auri et arsen. bromat. B 


— 




9 9 


0 5 


fin 


Ib 


Liq. azonubri 


— 




0 2 


0 1 


48 


Ib. 


Liq. bismuth! cone. B.P.C. 


— 




ft 

W tt 


0 2 




Ib 


Liq. bismuthi et am. cit. 


— 


n in 




— 


84 


lb. 


Liq. bismuthi (Schacht) 


— 


1 in 




0 1 


24 


Ib. 


Liq. bromidi co. B.P.C. 


— 


2 m 


n in 


0 2 


120 


Ib. 


Liq. bromochloral co. B.P.C. C 


— 


9 fl 


n 7 


— 


96 


Ib. 


Liq. calcii bisulphitis . . 


0 7 


n 1 




— 


18 


Ik 


Liq. calcii chloridi 


1 2 


U 1 




— 


1 1 

1 1 


lb. 


Liq. calcii hydroxid 


pint 


n f\ 

V V 




— 


4 


Ib. 


Liq. calcis chlorinatee . . 


1 2 


ft 


ft 2 


— 


10 


Ib. 


Liq. calcis chlor. c. ac bor. B.P.C. 


1 0 


n 4 




— 


8.5 


lb. 


Liq. calcis saccharatus . . 


1 5 


U D 


ft 9 


— 


50 


lb 


Liq. calcis sulphurata . . 


1 6 


u u 


n 7 


— 


/ J 


IK 


Liq. caoutchouc 


— 


^ 7 


1 n 

1 u 


— 


4? 


IK 


Liq. carb. deter. (Wright) unstd. 


— 




U o 


0 1 




Ib 

ID. 


Liq. carmini 


6 0 


1 4 

1 9 


n 


0 1 




IK 

ID. 


Liq. cauloph. et puis. co. 










12 


lb. 


(Oppenheimer) 


— 


3 9 


1 0 


— 


144 


Ib. 


Liq. cauloph. et pulsat. B.P.C. 


— 


"i 1 

V V 


0 11 


0 2 


120 


Ib. 


Liq. chlori 


2 0 


V O 




— 




Ib 

ID* 


Liq. cocci cact. . . 


— 


1 2 


0 4 


— 






Liq. cocci cact. B.P.C. . . 


— 


O u 


1 ft 


— 




Ib. 


Liq. cop. et buc. et cub. B.P.C. 


— 


9 7 


ft 9 


0 2 


114 


lb. 


Liq. cresoiis glycerinatus C 


2 4 


n 10 


ft 3 


— 


30 


lb. 


Liq. cresoiis saponatus . . C 


2 1 


1 1 
1 1 


0 4 


— 


II 




Liq. epispasticus . . C 


— 




1 1ft 


0 4 


1 1 


lb 

ID. 


Liq. ergosterol irrad. 


— . 


A 7 


per 


mil 


I] 


Ib 

ID. 


Liq. ethyl nitritis 


— 




7 n 


0 4 


n 
1 1 


IK 

ID. 




— 




1 R 
1 D 


1 3 






Liq. euonymi et cascar* 


— 


1 4 


1 ft 
X u 


0 2 


11 
1 1 


IK 

ID. 


Liq. euonymi et iridini 


— 


2 ?' 

M it 


ft 7 


0 1 






Liq. euonymini et papain! 


— 


9 Q 


fl in 

U xU 


0 2 


1 1 


IK 

ID. 


Liq. euonymin! et pepsini 


— 


2 0 

A V 


n 7 


0 1 


]<> 
\j 


IK 

lu. 


Liq. euonymini et pepsini c bis. 












IK 

ID. 


CO. (Oppenheimer) . . 


— 




1 n 

X U 


— 




IK 

ID. 


Liq. ferri acetatis 


— 


1 n 


n i 


— 


ZO 


OZ. 


Liq, ferri albuminatis B.P.C. . . 


— 


7 in 


n in 

U xU 


— 


j\j 


IK 
ID. 


Liq. ferri dialysatus '85 . . 


— 


n in 


n 

U w 


— 


4'S 


IK 

ID. 


Liq. ferri peptonatis 


— 


9 R 


n 4 


— 


1 o 


Ik 
ID. 


Liq. ferri perchloridi fortis 


— 


n R 

U 0 


n t 


— 




lb. 


Liq. ferri perchloridi . . 


— 


U 0 


n 7 


— 


Ik 

/o 


IK 

10. 


Liq. ferri pemitratis 


— 


n 7 

U f 


ft 7 


— 


q 


oz. 


Liq. ferri persulphatis . . 


— 


n Q 


n 1 


— 




IK 

ID. 


Liq. formaldehydi 


1 6 


n R 

U D 


n 7 


— 


17 
1 z 


IK 
ID. 


Liq. formaldehydi saponatus . . 


6 0 


1 Q 


n R 

U 0 


— 


JO 


14 OZ. 


Liq. gutta-percha B.P.C. C 


— 




7 in 


— 


^■^ 
3j 


oz. 


Liq. glyceryl trinitratis . . 


— 




1 s 


0 3 




oz. 


Liq. hamamelidis 


2 9 


n in 


n 




10 


oz. 


Liq. hydrargyri nitratis acidus. . 


— 




1 1 


0 3 


I'? 


oz. 


Liq. hydrargyri perchloridi C 


— 


n 


n 7 


— 


1 1 


oz. 


Liq. hydrogenii perox. 10 vol... 


1 0 


n A 


n 7 


— 


45 


lb. 


Liq. hydrogenii perox. 20 vol.. . 


1 6 


0 6 


0 2 


— 


39 






— 


2 9 


0 9 


0 2 


40 


oz. 




7 6 


2 2 


0 7 


0 1 


45 


oz. 


Liq. iodi. simp. . . 




3 9 


1 0 




22 


oz. 


Liq. magnesii bicarbonatis 


1 6 


0 5 


0 2 




24 


oz. 


Liq. magnesii bicarbonatis pkd. 


5vi. 


1 0 






12 


oz. 


Liq. morphinae acetatis B, F 






1 6 


0 3 


14 


oz. 


Liq. morphine bimeconatis B, F 






1 11 


0 4 


240 


24v. 


Liq. morphinae hydrochloridi B, F 






1 1 6 


0 3 


39 


lb. 



Li — Lo 

Liqnores — (cont.) 



a, F 
B. F 
B, F 
B. F 
B, F 



Liq. morphinae sulphatis 
Liq. morphin® tartratis 
Liq. opii sedativus B.P.C. 
Liq. opii sedativus P.L.F. 
Liq. opii sed. (Battley) . . 
Liq. pancreaticus P.L.F. 
Liq. pancreat. (Benger).. 
Liq. pancreatis . . 
Liq. papain! et iridini B.P.C. 
Liq. pepsini P.L.F. 
Liq. pepsini et papain! . . 
Liq. pepticus B.P.C. . . 
Liq. pepticus (Benger) . . 
Liq. picis carbonis 
Liq. picis carbonis meth. 
Liq. plumbi subacetatis fortit 
Liq. plumbi subacetatis 
Liq. potassas 

Liq. potass!! permangematis 
Liq. quin. ammon. 
Liq. quin. ammon. c.cinnam. 
Liq. rhe! dulcis P.L.F. 
Liq. rosas dulcis B.P.C. 
Liq. sabal. co. . . 
Liq. sacch. ust. B.P.C. . . 
Liq. santal! co. B.P.C. 
Liq. santal! co. P.L.F. . . 
Liq. santali ilav. c. buchu et 

cubeb. (Hewlett) 
Liq. saponis aether meth. 
Liq. sedans (P.D.) 
Liq. sennee dulc!s 
Liq. senecio co. . . 
Liq. soda: 

Liq. sodae chlorinatae . , 
Liq. sodae chlor. c. ac. bor. B.P.C. 

(cone. 1-9) .. 
Liq. sod. chlor.c. sod. bic B.P.C 

(cone. 1-9) .. 
Liq. sod. chlor. chir. 
Liq. ;sodi! arsenatis 
Liq. sodii bisulphitis 
Liq. sodii carbolatis co. 
Liq. sodii ethylatis 
Liq. strychninee hydrochloridi 
Liq. tarazaci 
Liq-. tartrazin co. 
Liq. thymol, co. 
Liq. trypsin. 
Liq. vibumi prunif. co. 
Liq. zinc! chloridi pur. 
Liq. zinc! chloridi coml. 
Listcrine, unstd. 
Lithii acetylsalicylas 
Lithii benzoas . . 
Lithii bromidum 
Lithii carbonas . . 
Lithii citras 

Lithii citras effervescens 
Lithii glycerophos. 
Lithii guaiacas . . 
Lithii hippuras . . 
Lithii iodidum . . 
Lithii lactas 
Lithii salicylas . . 
Lithii sulphas 

Liver extract (P , D. & Co.) 
Lobelia pkts. 



Selling Price 



16 oz. 


4oz. 


1 oz. 


1 At. 


f. d. 


J. J. 


$. d. 


1. d. 






1 11 

A A A 


n 4 






1 9 

A *7 


ft i 




2 4 


n Q 


n 7 




^ n 


n ifl 

U All 


A 9 




o u 


2 5 


n 




2 1ft 

M AV 


ft 9 






V U 


1 ft 

A U 


n 9 




2 2 


n ^ 


n 9 

U it 




1 4 

A «/ 


ft R 


ft 1 

U 1 




2 2 


0 9 


n 9 

U Xi 




3 n 


0 10 


n 9 
ll A 




n 11 

U AA 


0 3 






3 9 


1 0 


n 9 

U xt 




3 5 


1 0 


fl 9 

U it 


2 0 


0 7 


0 2 




1 9 


0 7 


fl 2 

U it 




0 6 


ft 2 


ft 1 

V A 




t 3 

A V 




n 2 




1 1 


0 4 


0 2 


— 


— 


1 9 


0 6 


0 1 




2 R 

it O 


ft 9 


n 9 




1 7 

A * 




ft 1 




1 ft 

A U 


0 4 


n 1 

V A 






0 8 


n 9 

U it 






ft 2 


n 1 

U A 




^ 9 


1 4 




— 


5 4 


.1 6 


0 3 





4 10 


1 3 


0 3 


5 3 


1 6 


0 6 






^ 4 


1 ft 


n 9 




1 ^ 


n 


n 1 






1 8 
X O 


n 


1 fi 

A U 


n R 


n 9 

V it 




1 6 

A U 


0 R 


0 2 

U Xi 






1 

A U 


fl 6 


n 1 

U A 




1 ^ 


n fi 


n f 


A V 










n 7 


0 3 




Q 7 

V t 


n ^ 


n 1 

U A 






n Q 

u «v 


n ^ 










n 7 




1 1 

A A 


n a 

V V 


n 1 

U 1 




1 Q 

A *P 


u u 


A 1 
If I 






fl 2 


n 1 

U A 


3 R 


1 1 
A A 


n 1 








n in 

U AU 


fl 9 

U it 






1 A 
A 4 


n 1 




1 d 

X Hi 


n K 




2 2 










1 4 

A *m 


n d 








4 in 








1 11 

A At 


n 4 






9 d 


n 4 






1 11 
1 11 


n il 






1 ft 
1 D 


n 4 




1 ft 
I 0 


n A 

U 0 










n in 






5 10 


0 10 






6 7 


1 1 






3 3 


0 6 






3 9 


0 7 






1 9 


0 3 






2 0 


0 4 


each 


26 8 








1 5 


0 S 





16 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST October 5, 1935 

SUPPLEMENT 



Cost 


Lo— Ma 




Selling Prica 


Cost 


Ma— Mi 




Selling Price 






































16 oz. 


4 


DZ. 


1 oz. 


1 dr. 








16 oz. 


4 oz. 


1 OZ. 


1 <lr. 


d. 


per 






J. d. 




d. 


I. d. 


1. d. 


d. 


per 






s. d. 


>. d. 


<. d. 


«. d. 


30 


lb. 


Lobelise pulvis . . 


C 


— 


1 


1 


0 4 


— 


36 


lb. 


Mangan. carbonas 




— 


— 


0 5 


0 1 


8 


lb. 


Lotio acidi borici I in 32 




1 0 


0 


6 


0 2 


— 


21 


lb. 


Mangani chloridum 




— 


0 8 


0 3 


— 


12 


lb. 


Lotio acidi carbol. rub. 5 p.c. 


c 


1 8 


0 


7 


0 3 


— 


22 


OZ. 


Mangani glycerophosphas 




— 


— 


3 3 


0 6 


16 


lb. 


Lotio calaminee B.P.C. . . 




2 0 


0 


7 


0 2 


— 


11 


oz. 


Mangani hypophosphis 




— 


— 


1 8 


0 3 


222 


lb. 


Lotio crinalis B.P.C. 




— 


8 


0 


2 2 


0 4 


8 


lb. 


Mangcmi oxidum nig. coml. 




1 0 


0 4 


0 2 


— 


15 


lb. 


Lotio hydrargyri flava . . 


c 


2 3 


0 10 


0 3 


— 


9 


lb. 


Mangani oxidum nig. gran. 




1 2 


0 4 


0 2 


— 


15 


lb. 


Lotio hydrargyri nigra . . 


c 


2 3 


0 


8 


0 3 


— 


7 


oz. 


Mangani peroxidum pur. preecip. 


— 


— 


1 1 


0 2 


8.5 


lb. 


Lotio hyd. perch. 1 in 1,000 


c 


1 2 


0 


4 


0 2 


— 


24 


lb. 


Mangani sulphas 




— 


0 11 


0 3 


— 


14 


lb. 


Lotio plumbi c. opio . . 


c 


1 9 


0 


6 


— 


— 


20 


lb. 


Mange dressing P.L.F. 




2 6 


0 9 


— 


— 


44 


lb. 


Lotio resorcin. composita 




6 0 


1 


9 


0 6 


— 


108 


lb. 


Manna elect, nov. 




— 


4 0 


1 1 


0 2 


15 


lb. 






2 0 


0 


7 


— 


— 


15 


oz. 


Mannite . . 




— 


— 


2 3 


0 4 


8 


lb. 


Lot. plumbi 




1 0 


0 


4 


— 


— 


72 


lb. 


Maranta Bermuda ver. . . 




9 0 


2 7 


0 9 


0 2 


115 


oz. 


Luminal . . 


B 










2 6 


39 


lb. 


Maranta Bermuda 




4 11 


1 5 


0 5 




72 


100 


Luminal tablets gr. li . . 


B 


doz. 


1 


2 


— 




24 


lb. 


Maranta St. Vincent opt. 




3 0 


0 11 


0 3 


— 


126 


oz. 


Luminal, sodium 


B 


— 






— 


3 0 


18 


lb. 


Maranta St. Vincent sec. 




2 3 


0 9 


0 3 


— 


18 


oz. 


Lupulinum 




— 






2 8 


0 5 


180 


lb. 


Marking ink P.L.F. 




— 


— 


1 9 


0 4 


36 


lb. 


Lupulus . . 


, , 


4 6 


1 


4 


0 5 


— 


12 


lb. 


Marrubium sice. 




1 6 


0 6 


0 2 


— 


6 


oz. 


Lycopodium 




— 






1 0 


0 2 


14 


lb. 


Marylebone cre«un 




1 9 


0 7 


— 


— 


5 


ea. 


Lymph, calf 




ea. 


0 


8 


— 


— 


66 


lb. 


Mastich. elect. . . 




— 


2 5 


0 9 


0 2 


13 


lb. 




C 


1 10 


1 


1 


0 4 


— 


14 


lb. 


Maw seed 




1 9 


0 6 


0 2 


— ■ 


















114 
129 


oz. 
100 


Medinal tablets gr. 5 . . 




doz. 


2 4 


— 


2 4 






M 














192 


100 


Medinal tablets gr. 7i . . 




doz. 


3 6 


— 


— 


60 


lb. 


Macis opt. 




7 6 


2 


2 


0 8 


— 


18 


lb. 


Mel Ang. . . . . 




2 3 


0 8 


0 3 


— 


48 


lb. 


Macis opt. parv. 




5 9 


1 


9 


0 6 


— 


14 


lb. 


Mel Calif 




1 9 


0 7 


0 2 




60 


lb. 


Macidis pulvis opt. 




7 6 


2 


2 


0 8 


— 


12 


lb. 


Mel Jam. 




1 6 


0 6 


0 2 


— 


48 


lb. 


Madder 




6 0 


1 


9 


0 6 


— 


14 


lb. 


Mel New Zealand 




1 9 


0 7 


— 


— 


22 


50 


Magisal tab. (Martindale) 




doz. 


0 


9 


— 


— 


10 


lb. 


Mel W.I. . . . . 




1 3 


0 5 


0 2 




















16 
15 


lb. 
lb. 


Mel boracis 

Mel depuratum . . 




2 0 
2 0 


0 7 
0 7 


0 3 
0 3 


— 






Magnesium 














24 


lb. 


Mel rosce 




— 


0 11 


0 4 


— . 


30 


lb. 


Magnesia levis . . 




3 9 


1 


1 


0 4 


— 


16 


lb. 


Mentha pulegium 




2 0 


0 7 


0 2 


— 


44 


lb. 


Magnesia ponderosa 




5 8 


1 


8 


0 6 


— 


21 


oz. 


Menthol 




— 


— 


3 1 


0 5 


84 


lb. 


Magnes. boro-citras 




— 


3 


0 


0 10 


0 2 


15 


oz. 


Menthol, synthetic 




— 


— 


2 3 


0 4 


13 


lb. 


Magnes. carbonas levis 




1 8 


0 


7 


0 2 


— 


42 


oz. 


Menthol cones (4 to oz.) 




ea. 


1 6 


~ 




15 


lb. 


Magnes. carbonas ponderosus 




1 10 


0 


7 


0 2 


— 


45 


oz. 


Menthol cones (8 to oz.) 




ea. 


0 10 


— 


— 


84 


lb. 


Magnes. citras (ver.) . . 




— 


3 


0 


0 10 


0 2 


18 


oz. 


Menthol snuff . . 




— 


— 


2 8 


0 s 


21 


lb. 


Magnes. cit. gran, efferv. 




2 9 


0 


9 


0 3 


— 


126 


oz. 


Menthol camphoras 




— 


— 




3 0 






Magnes. cit. eflf. opt. pled. 




— 


1 


0 


8 oz. 


1 9 


60 


oz. 


Menthol valerianas 




— 


— 


— 


1 3 


19 


lb. 


Magnes. cit. gran. eff. sec 




2 6 


0 


9 


0 3 


— 


12 


lb. 


Mercurial cream wgt . . 




— 


— 


1 6 


0 4 


8 


oz. 


Magnes. formas 




— 






1 2 


0 2 


60 


lOcc. 


Mercurochrome solution 




per 


CO. 


0 11 


— . 


14 


oz. 


Magnes. glycerophosphas 




— 






2 0 


0 4 


48 


16oz. 


Metatone (P. D. Co.) .. 




6 0 


8 oz. 


3 6 




33 


lb. 


Magnes. hydroxidum . . 






1 


3 


0 5 


0 1 


24 


oz. 


MethylacetEinilidum 








3 6 


0 6 


13 


oz. 


Magnes. hypophosphis . . 




— 






2 0 


0 4 


18 


oz. 


Methyl orange . . 




— 


— 


2 9 


0 6 


11 


oz. 






— 






1 8 


0 3 


96 


lb. 


Methyl orange sol. 




— 


3 6 


1 0 


— 


9 


oz. 


Magnes. peroxidum 15% 




— 






1 4 


0 3 


4 


oz. 


Methyl salicylas 




— 


— 


0 7 


0 1 


4 


oz. 


Magnes. phosph. acid . . 




— 






0 7 


0 1 


36 


oz. 


Methylsulphonal 




— 


— 


5 3 


0 9 


39 


lb. 


Magnes. phosphas 




— 


1 


5 


0 5 


0 1 


26 


oz. 


Methylthionin chlor. . . 




— 


— 


3 9 


0 7 


9 


oz. 


Magnes. salicylas 




— 






1 4 


0 3 


18 


oz. 


Metol 




— 


— 


2 3 


0 4 


48 


lb. 


Magnes. silicas pur. precip. 




— 


1 


9 


0 6 


0 1 


18 


lb. 


Mezerei cortex , . 




— 


0 8 


0 3 


— ■ 


4 


lb. 


Magnes. sulphas opt. . . 
Magnes. sulphas opt. pkd. 




0 6 

— 


0 
0 


3 
4 


0 1 
0 2 


— 
— 


18 


20 


Migranine tablets gr. 5i 




doz. 


1 8 


— 


— 


5 


lb. 


Magnes. sulphas (Howards) 




0 8 


0 


4 


0 2 


— 






Misturae 










• 


7 


lb. 


Magnes. sulphatis pulvis 




1 0 


0 


4 


0 2 


— 


8.5 


lb. 


Mistura alba 




1 0 


0 5 


0 2 


— 


10 


lb. 


Magnes. sulphatis pulvis exsicc. 


1 3 


0 


5 


0 2 


— 


120 


lb. 


Mist, ammoniaci co. cone. (1 to 7) 


— 


4 3 


1 2 


0 2 


5 


lb. 


Magnes. sulphatis pulvis color. . 


0 9 


0 


3 


— 


— 


15 


lb. 


Mist, amygdalae 




2 0 


0 7 


0 2 


— 


8 


lb. 


Magnes. sulphatis pulvis exsicc. 


1 0 


0 


4 


0 2 


— 


54 


lb. 


Mist, bismuthi c. morphina 


C 


7 0 


2 1 


0 8 


— ■ 


5 


lb. 


Magnes. sulphatis pulvis color. . 


0 9 


0 


3 


— 


— 


30 


lb. 


Mist, bismuthi co. B.P.C. 




4 0 


1 2 


0 4 


— ■ 


312 


cwt. 


Magnes. sulphas color. 




71b. 


2 


5 


141b. 


4 4 


33 


lb. 


Mist. bis. CO. c. peps. B.P.C. 




— 


1 6 


0 6 


— 


3 


lb. 


Magnes. sulphas coml. . . 




0 5 


0 


2 


— 


— 


123 


16 oz. 


Mist, bismuthi (Seller) . . 


fl. 


— 


3 10 


1 0 


0 2 


40 


cwt. 


Magnes. sulphas coml. . . 




7 lb. 


2 


0 


141b. 


3 6 


36 


lb. 


Mist, carminative B.P.C. 




4 6 


1 4 


0 5 




27 


lb. 


Magnes. sulphas efferv. 




3 5 


1 


0 


0 4 




14 


lb. 


Mist, cascarae co. B.P.C. 




1 10 


0 7 


0 2 




14 


oz. 


Magnesium (powder) . . 










2 0 


0 4 


18 


lb. 


Mist, chlori B.P.C. . . 




2 6 


0 9 


0 3 




21 


oz. 


Magnesium (ribbon) 




foot 


0 


3 


2 9 




20 


lb. 


Mist, chloroformi co. B.P.C. 




2 9 


0 10 


0 3 




















26 


lb. 


Mist, creosoti cone. 








1 1 


0 2 


24 


I6oz 


Magneslait (D.F.) 




hot. 


1 


3 


0 4 








Mist, cretae {v. Pulv. pro) 












15 


oz. 


Malachite green . i 










2 3 


0 4 


28 


lb. 


Mist, diarrhoea (B. of H.) P.L.F. 


3 6 


1 0 


0 4 




30 


oz. 












4 5 


0 8 


38 


lb. 


Mist, ferri aromatica . . 




5 0 


1 7 


0 5 






October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



17 



Sellinc Pries 


Coit 


Oc— 01 




Selliat Fric* 
























16 oz. 


4oz. 


1 OJ. 


1 dr. 


d. 






16 OZ. 


4oz. 


1 OZ. 


1 dr. 


<. d. 


: d. 


t. d. 


i. d. 


per 






>. i. 


<. d. 


>. d. 


t. d. 


J S 


1 A 

1 U 


n A 
U 4 




IZ 


OZ. 


Oculent. physostigminee 


C 






1 c 
1 6 


0 4 




3V11J. 


1 9 
1 O 




1A 


OZ. 


Oleo-resin cubebs 








A t* 

4 6 


0 10 


i 4 


1 U 


A A 
0 4 






















z **• 
3V1IJ. 


Z 6 








Olea 












2 7 


0 9 


A 9 
0 i 




00 


lb. 


Oleum abietis . . 






2 0 


A O 

0 8 


0 2 


3 0 


1 A 
1 0 


A 9 




1Q 

lo 


lb. 


01. adipis 






A O 

0 8 


A O 

0 3 




A n 
4 0 


1 0 


A C 

U 5 




1 JU 


dr. 


Ol.allii 




per 


min. 


A C 

0 6 






5 5 


1 1 

1 7 




OU 


OZ. 


01. amygd. Ang. ess. s.a.p. 








8 D 


1 3 


O 1 

I, 1 


A T 

U 7 


A 9 




CI 

31 


11 

lb. 


01. amygdalae Ang. 






1 1 A 
1 10 


0 7 






D 3 


1 / 




4ft 
no 


lb. 


01. amygdae dulc. exot. . . 




A 

b U 


1 O 

1 9 


U b 






1 b 


A C 

U b 




91 


OZ. 


01. tinethi Ang. . . 








O 1 


A C 

0 D 




1 i 


A A 
U 4 






OZ. 


01. angelicae rad. 










5 JL 




4 D 


1 9 






gal. 


01. animale 




1 9 

1 A 


A C 


U Z 












J 1 


Ik 
lb. 


01. anisi stellati . . 






1 1 A 

1 lU 


U D 


n 1 
U 1 


4 D 


1 4 








dr. 


01. anthemidis . . 




per 


min. 


A 1 

0 1 


A C 

4 5 




each 


9 A 




01 


QZ. 


01. apii . . 








O A 

8 4 


1 o 

1 3 


per 




A jl 

0 4 


1 0 A 

13 0 


15 


lb. 


01. arachis 




1 o 

1 8 


0 7 


0 2 




per 


gr- 


A A 

U 4 


in 

10 b 


1 Q 
10 


11 

lb. 


01. arachis pallid 




9 9 


A O 

0 8 


A O 




per 


gr. 


A >l 

U 4 


1 A C 

10 b 


lo 


OZ. 


01. aurantii amari 










A 4 
0 3 


per 


gr- 


A A 

U 4 


1 A C 

10 b 


1^ 
IP 


OZ. 


01. aurantii dulcis 










A 9 


per 


gr- 


A A 
0 4 


13 0 




OZ. 


01. aurantii tangierin . . 










A O 

0 8 


per 


gr. 


1 ' 9 
1 Z 






OZ. 


01. bergamottae . . 








1 9 


A O 

0 3 






J A 

4 0 


0 8 


30 


11 

lb. 


01. cadinum . . . . 






I 1 


A A 

0 4 


A 4 

0 1 




A 1A 

U lU 


A 9 




z: 
O 


OZ. 


01. cajuputi 








1 1 
1 1 


A 

0 z 


Z S 


A A 


A 9 






OZ. 


01. calam. arom. 








A A 

4 0 


A f 

0 7 


Q n 
O 9 


1 I 


A C 

0 5 




OA 


lb. 


01. camphorae ess. alb. . . 






All 
0 11 


A O 

0 3 




A C 

4 b 


1 a 


A C 

0 5 




Z4 


II 

lb. 


01. camphorae ess. (use. 






All 
0 11 








A if 

0 4 






77 

n 


OZ. 


01. canangae 








A A 

4 0 


A ^ 

0 7 




1 b 


A C 
U b 




1Q 

IV 


11 

lb. 


01. carbolicum 5 per cent. 


C 


Z i 


A Q 
U O 


U 0 




— 


1 2 


0 4 


— 


17 


lb. 


01. carbol. (vet.) 5 per cent. 


C 


2 0 


0 7 








A 11 
0 11 


A 9 

0 3 




01 

l\ 


OZ. 


01. can exot. 








O A 


0 5 




O A 


A in 
U lU 


A O 

0 2 


C\ 

y 


OZ. 


01. caryophylli . . 








1 A 

1 4 


A O 

0 3 




1 9 


' 0 6 


0 1 


11 


OZ. 


01. cassiae . . 








1 8 


A 4 

0 3 


4 6 


1 4 


A A 

0 4 


A 1 

0 1 


14 


OZ. 


01. cedri ligni (micros.) 








1 A 

2 0 


A A 

0 4 




2 5 


A A 

0 9 




C 1 

51 


11 

lb. 


01. cedri ligni . . 






1 11 
I 11 


A ^ 

0 7 


A 4 

0 1 


3 9 


1 2 






60 


1 

gal. 


01. cetacei 






A A 

0 4 


A 9 

0 2 












c 

3 


OZ. 


01. chaulmoogras 








A A 


A O. 

0 2 










1 o 

lo 

o 
0 


OZ. 
OZ. 


01. chenopodii . . 
01. cineieum 








Z 8 

O A 

2 4 


A C 

U 5 

A ji 

0 4 


pint 


1 9 






54 


OZ. 


01. dnnamomi . . 










1 2 




1 9 


A a 

0 6 


~~~ 


10 


OZ. 


01. cinnamomi (oL 




— 




1 c 

1 6 


A 4 

0 3 


0 8 


0 3 


0 1 




5 


OZ. 


01. citronellee 








A A 

0 9 


0 2 






4 5 


A O 

0 8 


1 7 

12 


11 

lb. 


01. cocois nuciferae 




1 b 


Q D 


A 9 
0 0 




0 8 


0 3 


0 1 




52 


gal. 


01. colzae (quantity) 




gal. 


£f e 
D 0 


pint 


0 11 






0 11 


A O 

0 2 


7 


OZ. 


01. copaibas 








1 1 
1 1 


A O 

0 2 






3 6 


0 6 


36 


OZ. 


01. coriandri Ang. 










A A 

0 9 








3 5 


27 


OZ. 


01. coriandri exot. 










0 7 


doz. 


1 9 


ea. 


3 6 


14 


OZ. 


01. crotonis 








O A 

2 0 


0 4 








1 7 


24 


OZ. 


01. cubebae Ang. 








3 b 


A f 

0 0 




e A 

5 0 


1 A 

1 4 


A O 

0 3 


26 


11 

lb. 


01. eucalypti 




O O 

o o 


1 0 


A A 

0 4 






1 8 


A C 

0 6 




24 


It 

lb. 


01. eucalypti amygdalae 






0 11 


A A 
U 4 






1 4 


A 

0 5 




11 


OZ. 


01. eucalypti citriodorae 








1 o 

1 8 


A O 

0 3 


1 3 


A e 

0 5 


A O 

0 2 




54 


lb. 


01. eucalypti glob. 






O fk 

Z 0 


A O 

0 8 








3 1 


0 6 


54 


OZ. 


01. foeniculi Ang. 










1 4 






1 8 


— 


12 


OZ. 


01. foeniculi exot. 








1 9 


0 3 




A 1 

0 7 


A O 




1 A 

14 


OZ. 


01. gaultheriae . . 








9 A 
Z 0 


A A 

0 4 






8 6 


1 3 


36 


OZ. 


01. geranii Afric 








5 3 


0 9 




2 6 


tube 




18 


OZ. 


01. geranii E.I. . . 








9 O 

2 8 


0 5 


per 


gr. 


0 3 




54 


OZ. 


01. geranii Gall. 








8 0 


1 2 


2 9 


1 It 


n A 


n 1 


uu 


gal. 


01. gossypii sem. 




1 0 


0 4 


0 2 








0 4 


0 1 


27 


lb. 


01. gurgun. 






1 0 


0 4 
















01. hippoglossi (see halibut-liver 






















oil) 
















0 6 


0 1 


5 


OZ. 










0 9 


0 2 




1 0 


each 




90 


dr. 


01. iridis concret. 










13 2 






2 0 


0 4 


13 


OZ. 










2 0 


0 4 






0 10 


0 2 


48 


OZ. 


01. juniperi bacc. Ang. 








7 0 


1 0 






1 6 


0 4 


8 


OZ. 


01. juniperi bacc. exot. 








1 2 


0 2 



Cost 



lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

lb. 

75 g. 
dr. 
dr. 
dr. 
dr. 
dr. 
dr. 
oz. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 



pt.. 
lb. 
lb. 

OZ. 

lb. 

OZ. 
OZ. 

dr. 

25 



lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

OZ. 

lb. 
lb. 

OZ. 

23 1. 
gm. 

lb. 

lb. 



OZ. 
OZ. 
OZ. 



Mi— Oc 

Misturs — (cent.) 



Mist, ferri composita . . 

Mist, (gripe) P.L.F 

Mist, guaiaci 

Mist, (influenza) P.L.F. 

Mist, magnesii hydroxidi 

Mist, olei ricini . . 

Mist, pepsini co. 

Mist, pepsini et bis. (Hewlett). . 

Mist, sennae co. . . 

Mist, senecio.'co. (Hewlett) . . 

Mist, tonic sedat. (Hewlett) 

Mist, tussi rub. (Hewlett) 

Mist, veronigen co. (Hewlett) C 

Mithridate (vet.) P.L.F. 
Mitigal liquid 

Morphina pur. . . . . B, F 
Morphinae aceta* . . B, F 
Morphinae hydrochloridum B, F 
Morphinae sulphas . . B, F 
Morphinae tartras . . B, F 
Moschus Chin, in gran. 
Moschus artificial. 
Mucilago acaciae 
Mucilago tragacanthae . . 

Mustard F 

Mustard D.S.F 

Mustard bran 

Myristicae 64's 

Myristicffl 80's 

Myristicae pulvis . . 

Myrrh, elect 

Myrrh, sorts 

Myrrh, sorts, parV. 
Myrrh, pulv. opt. 
Myrrh, pulv. sec. (vet.) 



N 

Naphtha solvent 
Naphthalin. pur. 
Naphthalin. coml. flake 
Naphthalin tetrachlor. . . 
Naphthal. coml. glob. . . 
Naphthol (beta) 
Naphthol salicyl. 
Narcotina 

Neo-bomyval perles 
Neo-protosil 
Nepenthe 
Nessler's solution 
Nickel chloridum 
Nickel sulphas coml. 
Nicotina coml. . . 
Nicotine fumigant P.L.F. 
Nitrobenzenum . . 

Novalgin pulv 

Novalgin tabs. . . 
Novocain 

Nucis vomicae pulvis 
Nux vomic. pulverata . . 



B. F 



0 

Oculentum acidi borici . . 
Oculenta in tubes 
Oculent. atropinae 
Oculent. flavum 
Oculent. flav. c. atropine 



18 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



October 5, 1935 



Cost 


Ul 

Olea — (cont.) 


Selling Price 


Cost 


Ul — Jra 

Olea — (cont.) 


















i. 


per 


16 oz 

d. 


4 oz 
1. d. 


1 oz 

>. d. 


1 dr 
•. d. 


d. 


per 


60 


lb. 


01. juniperi ligni 


— 


2 2 


0 7 


0 1 


22 


OZ. 




114 


oz. 


01. lavandulae Ang. 


— 


— 


— 


2 4 


16 


oz. 


01. sabinx 


50 


oz. 


01. lavandulae ab flor. . . 


— 


— 


7 4 


1 1 


9 


oz. 


/~\i 1 ■ 


55 


oz. 


01. lavandulae redist. . . 


— 


— 


8 1 


1 2 


18 


lb. 


Ul. sambuci vinde 


192 


lb. 


Ul. lavandulae Uall. 


— 


— 


2 0 


0 4 


26 


oz. 


Ul. santal. Aust. 


168 


lb. 


01. lavandulae spic. ver. 


— 


5 10 


1 9 


0 3 


36 


oz. 


01. santali flav. Ang. 


108 


lb. 


/~ii I II* 1 
Ul. lavanauiee spic. coml. 


— 


3 10 


1 1 


0 2 


33 


oz. 


Ul. santah nav. L.l. 


36 


oz. 


01. limetts dest. 


— 


— 


5 3 


0 9 


9 


oz. 


Ul. sassafras nat. 


120 


oz. 


Ul. Iimettae (hand pressed/ 




— 


— 


2 6 






Ul. sassai. artit. (p. bafrol.) 


11 


oz. 


01. limonis 


— 


— 


1 8 


0 3 


12 


lb. 


rw ' 


10 


oz. 


Ul. limonis (Messina; . . 


— 


— 


1 6 


0 3 


12 


lb. 


Ul. smapis expressum . . 


36 


oz. 


01. linaloes 


— 


— 


4 6 


0 10 


30 


oz. 


Ul. smapis volatile 


48 


gal. 


01. lini opt 


pint 


0 9 


0 2 


— 


11 


oz. 


Ul. staphisagnae 


51 


gal. 


01. lini (boiled) .. 


pint 


0 10 


0 2 


— 


22 


oz. 


01. staphisagriae (aether.) 


36 


gal. 


01. lini (cattle) 


pint 


0 8 


gal. 


4 6 


20 


lb. 


Ul. succini rectihcatum 


120 


dr. 


01. lupuli Ang. . . 


per 


min. 


0 4 


— 


84 


gal. 


. 1 • . 1 • 
Ul. terebinthinae 


15 


oz. 


Ul. marjoram 


— 


— 


2 3 


0 4 


21 


lb. 


Ul. terebinthinae rectihcatum 


108 


lb. 


Ul. menthas Jap. (dementn.J . . 


— 


3 iO 


1 1 


0 2 


30 


lb. 


.LI ^* M. 

Ul. theobromatis opt. . . 


78 


oz. 


Ul. menthae pip. (Mitcnam) . . 


— 


— 


— 


1 8 


12 


oz. 


^1 ..L * IL 

Ol. thymi alb 


288 


lb. 


01. menthae pip. redest. 


— 


10 3 


3 0 


0 5 


102 


lb. 


^1 aL 


100 


oz. 


r\\ .1 • A 

Ul. menthae vir. Ang. . . 


— 


— 


— 


2 6 


10 


oz. 


r\\ .1 • 1 


20 


oz. 


01. menthae vir. exot 


— 


— 


2 10 


0 6 


66 


gal. 


Ul. train opt. 


96 


gal. 


Ul. morrhuae (Newn.) . . 


1 4 


0 6 


0 2 


— 


8 


oz. 


r\\ 1 


114 


gal. 


01. morrhuae (Nor.) 


1 8 


0 7 


0 2 


— 


42 


oz. 


r\i .* ^ 


66 


gal. 


01. morrhuae (vet.) 


pint 


1 0 


gal. 


8 6 


78 


gal. 


/^i *• 1 1 •» . 

Ul. whale opt. . . . 


13 


oz. 


01. myricae acris ess. 


— 


— 


2 0 


0 4 


72 


oz. 


r\} 1 1 


17 


oz. 


01. myristicae Ang 


— 


— 


2 6 


0 5 








13 


oz. 


01. myristicae exot. 


— 


— 


1 11 


0 4 


28 


lb. 


/-ivi _ 


16 


oz. 


01. myristicae express. . . 


— 


— 


2 4 


0 4 


43 


gm. 


Umnopon pdr. (Koche) B 


16 


lb. 


01. neatsfoot 


2 0 


0 7 


0 2 


— 


27 


20 


Umnopon tabs. . . .. B 


63 


dr. 


01. neroli 


per 


min. 


0 3 


— 


28 


oz. 


Upium lure B, 


54 


dr. 


01. neroli Ital 


per 


min. 


0 2 


— 


30 


oz. 


Upii pulv. . . . . B, 


72 


oz. 


01. neroli synth. 


— 


— 


— 


1 5 


60 


5 gm. 


Upoidine . . . . B 


144 


gal. 


01. olivae (cream) 


2 0 


0 7 


0 2 


— 


50 


100 


Upoidine tablets gr. f . . B 


126 


gal. 


01. olivae (sublime) 


1 9 


0 7 


0 2 


— 


21 


oz. 




108 


gal. 


01. ollvffi (fine) . . 


1 6 


0 6 


0 2 


— 


11 


20 


Uptannin tablets gr. /i 


13 


oz. 


01. origani alb. . . 


— 


— 


1 8 


0 4 


96 


oz. 


.1 • 


72 


lb. 


01. origani coml. . . 


— 


2 7 


0 9 


0 2 


99 


oz. 




15 


lb. 


01. palmae 


2 0 


0 7 


0 2 


— 


24 


lb. 


Ussis sepiae (medium; . . 


22 


oz. 


01. palmarosae . . 


— 


— 


3 3 


0 6 


27 


lb. 


Ussis sepiae pulv. subtil. 


24 


oz. 


01. patchouli 


— 


— 


— 


0 6 


150 


dr. 


Otto rosae (virgin) 


30 


lb. 


01. persicee Ang. . . . . 


3 9 


1 2 


0 4 


— 


30 


dr. 


Otto rosae (synthetic) . . 


38 


lb. 


01. persicffi Ang. pall 


4 9 


1 5 


0 5 


— 


15 


lb. 


r\ 1 
Uxymel . . 


18 


oz. 


01. petitgrain 


— 


— 


2 8 


0 5 


26 


lb. 


Uxymel ipecacuanhae . . 


13 


oz. 


01. phosphoratum 


— 


— 


1 11 


0 4 


12 


lb. 


f\ \ '11 


12 


lb. 


01. picis 


1 6 


0 6 


0 2 


— 


24 


oz. 


/~l • 1* 1 L / \ 

Uxyqumolin. svilph. (ortno.; 


16 


lb. 


01. picis rectificatum . . 


2 0 


0 7 


0 3 


— 








14 


oz. 


01. pimentae exot. 


— 


— 


— 


0 4 






n 
P 


13 


oz. 


01. pini pumilionis 


— 


— 


2 0 


0 4 


67 


lOcc. 


radutin 


90 


lb. 


01. pini sylvestris fact. . . 


— 


— 


0 11 


0 2 


18 


oz. 


Pancreatini 


144 


lb. 


01. pini (spruce) 


— 


5 2 


1 6 


0 3 


42 


oz. 


Papainum 


42 


oz. 


01. piperis 


— 


— 


5 0 


1 0 


72 


dr. 


Papaverina 


100 


oz. 


01. pulegii Ang. 


— 


— 


14 0 


2 5 


72 


dr. 


n ' 1 L 

rapavenn. sulph. 


108 


lb. 


01. pulegii exot. 


— 


4 0 


1 1 


0 2 


132 


100 


r» 1 A 

rapavens capsulae Ang. 


66 


gal. 


01. rapii . . 


1 0 


0 4 


0 2 


— 


12 


lb. 


rapavens capsulae cont. 


36 


oz. 


01. rhodii (fact.) 


— 


— 


5 3 


0 9 


55 


8 oz. 


Papine (Battle) . . 


20 


lb. 


01. ricini Ital. insip. 


2 6 


0 9 


0 3 




18 


20 


Paracodin tablets 


13 


lb. 


01. ricini (first) 


1 8 


0 7 


0 4 


— 


8 


lb. 


Paraffinum durum 


10 


lb. 


01. ricini (cattle) 


1 4 


0 6 


— 




10 


lb. 


n tr I' ' J 

raraihnum liquidum 


84 


gal. 


01. ricini (cattle) 


pint 


1 6 


gal. 


10 6 






Paraffinum liquidum, pkd. 


48 


lb. 


01. ricini aromaticum . . 




1 9 


0 6 




8 


lb. 


r» /r 1' ' 1 a 

raramnum liquidum navum 


60 


lb. 


01. rosae color. . . 




2 2 


0 7 




13 


lb. 


Paraffinum molle album 


180 


oz. 


01. rosmarini Ang. . . 








4 4 


17 


lb. 


Paraffinum molle album 


45 


lb. 


01. rosmarini exot. 




1 7 


0 6 


0 1 


8 


lb. 


Paraffinum molle flavum 


66 


lb. 


01. rosmarini super. 




2 5 


0 9 


0 2 


11 


lb. 


Paraffinum molle flavum 


90 


lb. 


01. rosmarini Gall. 




3 2 


0 11 


0 2 


10 


lb. 


Paraffinum (toilet) 


27 


lb. 


01. rusci B.P.C 




1 0 


0 4 




6 


oz. 


Paraformaldehydum 


84 


lb. 


01. rusci ver 




3 0 


0 10 


0 2 


4 


oz. 


Paraldehydum . , 



Selling Price 



16 oz. 

i. d. 


4 oz 

d. 


1 gz 

«. i 


1 dr 
<. I 






3 3 


0 6 


— 


— 




2 4 


— 


— 


1 4 


0 3 


2 3 


0 8 


0 3 


— 


— 


— 


3 9 


0 7 


— 


— 


5 3 


0 9 


— 


— 


4 10 


0 9 


— 


— 


1 4 


0 3 


1 6 


0 8 


0 2 


— 


1 6 


0 6 


0 2 


— 


— 


— 


4 5 


0 8 


— 


— 


1 8 


0 3 


— 


— 


3 3 


0 7 


— 


0 9 


0 3 







1 6 


0 2 




2 5 


0 9 


0 3 




3 9 


1 1 


0 4 


0 1 






1 9 


0 3 


— 


3 8 


1 0 




— 


— 


1 6 


0 3 


pint 


1 0 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 2 


0 2 


— 
pint 

— ' 


— 
1 3 

— 


— 
— 
— 


1 0 
— 
1 7 


— 


1 1 


0 4 


0 1 


per 


gf- 


0 6 


— 


doz. 


2 0 


— 


— 


— 


— 


4 1 


0 7 


— 


— 


4 5 


0 8 


per 


gr- 


0 5 


— 


doz. 


1 0 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


0 6 


doz. 


0 10 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 0 








2 2 


3 0 


0 11 


0 3 




3 4 


1 0 


0 4 




per 


min. 


0 5 


— 


per 


min. 


0 2 


4 5 


2 3 


0 8 


0 3 


— 


3 10 


1 2 


0 4 


— 


2 3 


0 8 


0 3 


— 


— 


— 


3 9 


0 7 


0 10 


per 


c.c. 


— 


— 


— 


2 8 


0 5 


— 


— 


6 4 


0 10 


per 


gr. 


0 3 


— 


per 


gr- 


0 3 


— 


ea. 


0 3 


— 


— , 


1 9 


0 6 


— 


— 


— 


— 


e 10 


0 2 


doz. 


1 7 


— 


— 


1 0 


0 4 


0 2 


— 


1 4 


0 6 


0 2 


— 


-— 


0 10 


gxij. 


2 4 


1 0 


0 4 


0 2 




1 8 


0 7 


0 2 




1-lb. 


tins 


2 2 




1 0 


0 4 


0 2 




1-lb. 


tins 


1 5 




1 3 


0 s 


0 2 








0 9 


0 2 






0 7 


0 1 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



19 



Selling Price 


Cost 


ri — Po 

Pilulse — (cont.) 


Selling Price 


16 oz. 
«. a. 


4az. 

f* a. 


I 

1. 


OZ. 
J 
d. 


1 dr. 
J. a. 


J 
a. 


per 


16 OZ. 
J 

s, a. 


4 OZ. 

J. d. 


1 OZ. 

i. d. 


I dr. 
>. J. 






2 


3 


0 6 




IK 


Pil. aloes et myrrhje pulvis 




9 7 


a 4 




4 0 


1 2 


0 


4 




7'i 




Pil. aloes socot. pulvis . . 




2 Q 


n 10 

U AU 


n 9 


5 6 


1 7 


0 


5 




1 U 


50 


Pil. Alophen (P.D. & Co.) . . 




2 ft 








2 0 


0 


7 




84 


lb. 


Pil. cambogiee co. pulvis 




3 0 


U AU 


0 2 




2 5 


0 


8 


0 2 


64 


lb. 


Pil. cochiae 




2 2 


0 7 


0 1 


S 0 


1 3 


0 


4 


0 1 


108 


lb. 


Pil. colocynthidis co. pulvis 




4 n 


1 1 

A A 


0 2 






2 


0 


0 4 






Pil. colocynthidis et hyoscy. 










2 0 


0 7 


0 


2 








pulvis . . . . . . C 




5 10 


1 7 




2 9 


0 10 


0 


3 




52 


lb. 


Pil. conii CO. B.P.C . . C 




2 0 


0 7 


0 1 

1 


3 11 


1 1 


0 


4 




24 


lb. 


Pil. ferri 




1 0 


0 4 


w A 




2 2 


0 


8 




15 




Pil. ferri iodidi 






2 3 


fl 4 


cloz. 


1 6 








114 


lb. 


Pil. galbani co. pulvis . . 




5 0 


1 3 


0 3 


per 


erf 


1 


0 




78 


lb. 


Pil. hydrargyri pulvis . . 




2 10 


0 9 


ft 9 




3 6 


1 


0 


0 2 


102 


lb 


Pil. hyd. subchlor. co. pulvis . . 




3 9 


1 n 

A U 


ft 2 




4 1 


1 


1 


0 2 


126 


lb. 


Pil. ipecacuanhas c. scilla B, ex F 




4 3 


1 2 


0 2 




4 1 


1 


1 


0 2 


10 


OZ* 


Pil. phosphori . . 






1 fi 

A u 


n 

u o 






2 


4 


0 4 


8 




Pil plumbi c. opio S, ex F 






1 2 


0 2 






2 


6 


0 5 




oz* 


Pil. quininae sulphatis . . 






7 n 


1 n 

A V 




4 0 


1 


0 


0 2 


72 


lb 


Pil. rhei co. pulvis 




2 7 


n 4 


n 9 






7 


4 


1 1 


12 




Pil. saponis co. pulvis . . B, f 






1 9 


u o 






2 


4 


0 4 


21 




Pil. scammonii co. pulvis 






3 0 


0 6 


1 ^rn* 


2 0 








78 


lb. 


Pil. scills CO. pulvis 




2 9 


0 10 


0 2 


6 6 




box 




57 


trail 
gall. 


Pine disinfecting fluid . . 


1 0 


per 


pmt 




5 3 


1^6 


0 


6 


0 1 


] 1 


ib. 


Pimentee fructus 


1 5 


0 6 


0 2 




3 9 


1 0 


0 


4 




14 


lb 
ID. 


Pimenta: fructus pulvis 


1 4 

Jl V 




ft 9 








0 11 


0 2 




Ik 
ID. 


Piper album 


4 2 


1 2 


ft d 












1 5 


J J 


IK. 

ID. 


Piperis aibi pulvis 


4 2 


1 9 


fl 4 




doz. 


1 0 








36 


lb. 


Piper longum 


4 6 


1 4 


0 5 








n 
i. 


u 


0 4 


18 


lb. 


Piper nigrum extra 


2 3 


0 8 


0 3 








3 


3 


0 6 


20 


lb 


Piperis nigri pulvis 


2 6 


0 9 










2 


11 


0 5 


84 


OZ* 


Piperazina 






12 4 


1 in 

A Av 










0 10 


uu 


0Z> 


Piperina . . 








1 

A O 










0 10 


'54 


A 
u 


Pitocln amps. 


CA. 












8 


0 


1 6 


54 




Pitressin 




6 0 






3 3 


1 0 


0 


4 


0 1 


15 


IK 


Pix Barbadense . . 


2 0 


n 9 










0 


9 


0 2 


^ 1 


Ik 
ID. 


Pix Burgundica ver. 


2 ft 


n 4 


fl ? 
u o 






0 9 


0 


3 




)<; 
u 


ID* 


Pix Burgundica fact 


1 9 


n fi 


fl 7 




2 0 


0 7 


0 


2 




16 


IK 

ID. 


Pix carbonis praep. 


2 0 


0 fi 


fl 2 








1 


1 




Q 


Ik 
10. 


Pix liquida 




u o 


ft 9 








4 


0 


0 7 


DO 


gm.. 


Platini chloridum 


per 




ft 








3 


6 


0 8 


81 
U 1 


OZ* 


Platini chloridi sol. 5 per cent. 






11 9 


1 Q 

A 7 


per 


8T- 


0 


2 




17 

1 L 


gr. 


Platinum foil or wire . . 


per 


gl'' 


1 Q 








1 


0 


0 3 


1 J 


Ik 

ID. 


Plumbi acetas pur. 


1 A 


n 7 


ft ? 








1 


1 


0 3 


1 1 
1 1 


Ik 
iD. 


Plumbi acetas coml. 


1 ^ 




ft 9 








1 


1 




13 


Ik 
ID. 


Plumbi arsen. wash P.L.F. A, B 


1 fl 

1 0 








per 


gr. 


1 


2 




7ft 


Ik 
ID. 


Plumbi carbonas pur. . . 




1 0 


ft d 


ft 1 
U 1 


j~" 




9 


3 




77 


OZ. 


Plumbi iodidum 






O 0 


fl R 
U D 


uOZ* 


1 0 








TO 


Ik 
ID. 


Plumbi oleas (normal) . . 


R n 


1 4 

A 9 


fl 7 
u 4 








12 


4 


2 n 


in 


Ik 
ID. 


Plumbi oxidum (litharge) 


A O 


U 3 


fl 9 












ft 


17 


Ik 
ID. 


Plumbi oxidum rubrum 


A O 


n fi 


fl 7 






2 OZ. 


3d 


ea. 




7ft 


OZ. 


Podophylli resma 






4 1 

1 A 


fl 7 


2 6 




0 


3 




on 


Ik 
ID* 


Pot-pourri P.L.F. 


A A O 




fl 11 
U Al 








0 


7 


n 1 




















0 


7 








Potassium 














3 


4 






IK 

ID. 


Potassa caustica (sticks) 


4 10 




fl ^ 






1 5 


0 


5 




1 o 


IK 

ID. 


Potassa caustica (black ash) 


2 3 


0 8 


fl ^ 






1 d 


0 


5 




7n 
zu 


Ik 

Id. 


Potassa caustica (granular) 


9 R 

Ct o 


n 4 


ft 9 






1 in 

A Iv 


0 


7 




1 J 


Ik 
id. 


Potassa caustica lump coml. 












1 n 


0 


4 




IC 

13 


Ik 

ID. 


Potassa sulphurata 




n 7 


ft 9 






1 10 


0 


7 




21 


lb. 


Potassii acetas gran. 


2 8 


0 10 


0 3 








1 


2 




5 


OZ. 


Potassii arsenas . . . . A, B 






0 10 








1 


4 




27 


OZ. 


Potassii benzoas nat. . . 






4 0 


0 7 


per 


gr- 


0 


5 




8 


OZ. 


Potassii benzoas synth. 






1 2 


0 3 


per 


St- 


0 


5 




11 


lb. 


Potassii bicarbonatis pulvis 


1 5 


0 5 


0 2 














19 


lb. 


Potassii bichromas 


2 5 


0 9 


0 3 






2 4 


0 


8 


0 2 


12 


lb. 


Potassii bichrom. coml. . • 


1 9 


0 6 


0 2 






2 6 


0 


9 


0 2 


51 


lb. 


Potassii borotartras 


6 6 


1 10 


0 7 






2 8 


0 


9 


0 2 


32 


lb. 


Potassii bromidum gran. 


4 0 


1 2 


0 4 





Cest 



per 



oz. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
oz. 

lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

100 

gr- 

lb. 
8oz. 
8oz. 

oz. 

oz. 
8 oz. 

oz. 

oz. 

5.0 
10 

lb. 

lb. 

oz. 

oz. 

oz. 

oz. 

oz. 

oz. 

oz. 

oz. 

oz. 

lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

oz. 
oz. 
oz. 
gm. 
oz. 



25 gm 
100 
oz. 
dr. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
oz. 

lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 



gr. 
gr- 

lb. 
Ib. 
lb. 



Pa— Pi 



Paramidophenol hyd. . . 
Parenol (alb.) B.P.C. .. 
Parenol liq. (alb.) B.P.C. 
Parogenum B.P.C. 
Parogenum iodi B.P.C. 
Parolein (B.W.) . . 
Pasta bismuthi et iodoformi 
Pasta zinci ox. co. 
Pasta zinci et gelat. B.P.C. 
Piista zinci et ichtham. B.P.C. 
Pastilles, fumigating 
Pavon tablets . . . . B, 
Pelletierinse tannas 
Pepsencia (Fairchild) . . 
Pepsin, c. bism. co. (Schacht) 
Pepsin. liquid. (Schacht) 
Pepsinum porcl . . 
Pepsin, (scale) . . 
Peptenzyme elixir unstd. 
Peptenzyme pwdr., unstd. 
Peptonum siccum 
Percaine crystals, vials . . 
Percaine 1,200 amps. . . 
Perichthol 

Petroleum leve 

Phenacetlnum . . 
Phenalgin unstd. 
Phenalgin tablets gr. 5 unstd. 
Phenazonum 
Phenazonum caff. cit. . . 
Phenazoni salicylas 
PhenobarbiteJ 
Phenobarbital, solubile 
Phenocoli hydrochloridum 
Phenol cryst. 
Phenol (iodised) 
Phenol, liquefact. 
Phenol 2% alcoholic 
Phenolphthaleinum 
Phenylenediaminae hyd. 
Phenylhydrazinee hydroch. 
Phloroglucin. 
Phosphoric anhydride . . 
Phosphorus, amorph. . . 
Phosphorus, yellow 
Physostigmin sal. 

Phytin 

Phytin tablets . . 
Phytolaccinum . . 
Picrotoxinum . . . . 
Pig powders P.L.F. I. . . 
Pig powders P.L.F. IL 
Pigmentum aconiti co. meth. 
Pig. caseini B.P.C. 
Pig. chrysarobini B.P.C. 
Pig. iodi (Mandl) 
Pig. iodi N.I.F. 
Pig. iodi fort. N.I.F. . . 
Pigmentum iodi meth. . . 
Pigmentum iodi meth. fort. 
Pig. iodoformi . . 
Pig. salol 
Pilocarpinae hydrochloridum B 
Pilocarpinae nitras . . B 

Piluls 
Pil. aloes pulvis . . 
Pil. aloes et asafetidae pulvis . . 
PiL aloes et ferri pulvis 



20 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



October 5, 1935 



Cott 


Po— Pu 

Potastiam — (cont.) 


Selling Prict 


Cost 


Sru. — Ko 


Selling Price 


16 oz. 
<. i. 


4 01. 
>. d. 


1 oz. 

,. d. 


1 dr. 


16 oz. 
<. d. 


4 oz. 
>. d. 


1 oz. 

<. d. 


1 dr. 
>. d. 


i. 


per 


d. 


per 


15 


lb. 


Potassii carbonas 


•• 


2 0 


0 7 


0 2 


— 


7 


oz. 


Pulv. kino CO. . . B, ex f 


— 


— 


1 1 


0 2 


8 


lb. 


Potassii carbonas coml. 




1 0 


0 4 


0 2 


— 


27 


lb. 


r\ 1 111* T% n 

Pulv. lobehae co. B.P.C 


— 


1 0 


0 4 


— 


14 


lb. 


Potassii chloras. pulvis pur. 


•• 


— 


0 7 


0 2 


— 


10 


oz. 


Pulv. opii co B, F 


— 


— 


1 6 


0 3 


9 


lb. 


Potassii chloratis pulvis coml. 


•• 


— 


0 4 


0 2 


— 


8 


oz. 


Pulv. pepsini co. 


• — 


— 


1 2 


0 2 


12 


lb. 


Potassii chloridum pur. 




1 6 


0 6 


0 2 


— 


26 


lb. 


Pulv. pro mist, cretae . . 


3 3 


1 0 


0 4 


0 1 


8 


lb. 


Potassii chloridum coml. 




1 0 


0 4 


— 


— 


30 


lb. 




— 


1 2 


0 4 


0 1 


114 


gm. 


Potassii chloroplatinis . . 




per 


gr. 


1 0 


— 


72 


lb. 


rulv. scammonu co. 


— 


2 7 


0 10 


0 2 


34 


lb. 


Potassii chromas 




— 


1 3 


0 5 


— 


19 


lb. 


n 1 • 11*1 


ea. 


3d. 


— 


— 


34 


lb. 






— 


1 3 


0 5 


0 1 


24 


lb. 


Pulv. stramon. co. B.P.Q 


— 


1 0 


0 4 


— 


42 


lb. 


rotassu citras eft. D.r.C. 




5 3 


1 6 


0 5 


0 1 


33 


lb. 


nil ii 

rulv. tragacanthae co. . . 


— 


1 3 


0 4 


0 1 


48 


lb. 


rotassu cyanidum 40% 


B 


6 0 


1 9 


0 7 


0 2 


12 


lb. 


Pulv. zinc, amylo ac. bor. 


1 6 


0 6 


— 


— 


42 


lb. 


Potassii ferricyanidum . . 




5 3 


1 6 


0 5 


0 1 


28 


oz. 




— 


— 


— 


0 7 


39 


lb. 


Potassii ferricyanidum coml. 




4 10 


1 5 


0 5 


— 


30 


lb. 


n .1 • 1' ' 1 • 

ryrethn radicis pulvis . .' 


— 


1 1 


0 4 


— 


18 


lb. 


Potassii ferrocyanidum . . 




2 3 


0 8 


0 3 


— 


18 


oz. 




— 


— 


2 8 


0 s 


5 


oz. 






— 


— 


0 9 


0 2 


24 


oz. 


n . 1 . 


— 


— 


3 6 


0 6 


5 


oz. 


rotassu glyceroph. DU% 




— 


— 


0 9 


0 2 


39 


oz. 


Pyrogallol monoacet. sol. 


— 


— 


5 9 


1 0 


12 


oz. 


Potassii gueiiacolsulphonas 




— 


— 


1 9 


0 3 


36 


oz. 


Pyrogallol triacetas 


— 


— 


5 3 


1 0 


48 


oz. 


Potassii hippuras 




— 


— 


7 0 


1 0 
















7 


oz. 


Potassii hypophosphis . . 


•• 


— 


— 


1 1 


0 2 






Q 










93 


lb. 


Potassii iodidum 




— 


3 4 


0 11 


0 2 


8 


lb. 


Quassiae ligni rass. 


1 0 


0 4i 


0 2 


— 


13 


lb. 


Potassii metasulphis 




1 8 


0 6 


0 2 


— 


14 


lb. 


Quassiae hgni pulvis 


— 


0 7 


0 3 


0 1 


15 


lb. 






2 0 


0 8 


0 3 


— 


108 


dr. 


• 1 
L2uassmum amorph. 




— 


— 


15 0 


7 


lb. 


Potassii nitras coml. 


■• 


0 11 


0 3 


0 li 


— 


48 


lb. 


Quebracho cortex 


— 


1 9 


0 6 


— 


768 


cwt. 


Potassii nitras coml. 




71b. 


5 10 


141b. 


10 10 


10 


lb. 


(Juercus cortex 


I'd 


0 5 


0 2 


— 


20 


lb. 


Potassii oxalas neut. 


E 


— 


0 9 


0 3 


0 1 


12 


lb. 


Quillaiae cortex 


— 


0 6 


0 2 


— 


20 


lb. 


Potassii permanganas . . 




2 6 


0 9 


0 3 


— 


15 


lb. 


Quillaiaa cortex contusus 


2 0 


0 7 


0 2 


— 


45 


lb. 


Potassii persulphas 




— 


1 4 


0 5 


0 1 


18 


lb. 


Quillaiae corticis pulvis 


— 


0 8 


0 3 


— 


45 


lb. 


Potassii phosphas 




5 7 


1 8 


0 6 


0 1 








Gr.x. 








24 


lb. 


Potassii phosphas coni). 




3 0 


1 0 


0 3 


— 


96 


oz. 


Quintdma 


0 5 


— 


— 


2 0 


48 


lb. 


Potassii phosph. (tribasic) 




— 


1 9 


0 6 


— 


69 


oz. 


Qumidmae sulph. . . 


0 4 


— 


— 


1 6 


12 


oz. 


Potassii salicylas 




— 


— 


1 9 


0 3 


69 


oz. 


Quinina . . 


0 3 


— 


— 


1 6 


36 


lb. 


Potassii silicas fus. 




— 


1 4 


0 5 


— 


90 


oz. 


Quinm. acetylsalicylas . . 


0 4 


— 


— 


2 0 


15 


oz. 


Potassii succinas 




— 


— 


2 3 


0 4 


66 


oz. 


Qumm. ethylcarbonas . . 


0 3 


— 


— 


1 6 


13 


lb. 


Potassii sulphas pulv. . . 




— 


0 7 


0 2 


0 1 


78 


oz. 


/~\ • • 1 1 1 
Quinm. glycerophosphas 


0 4 


— 


— 


1 8 


6 


lb. 


Potassii sulphas coml. . . 




0 9 


0 3 


0 1 


— 


90 


oz. 


Quinin. hydriodidum acidum . . 


0 4 


— 


— 


2 0 


30 


lb. 


Potassii sulph. c. sulph. 




— 


1 1 


0 4 


— 


54 


oz. 


Quinin. hydrobromldum 


0 3 


— 


— 


1 2 


7 


oz. 


Potassii sulphis 




— 


— 


1 1 


0 2 


54 


oz. 


Quinin. hydrobromid. acidum. . 


0 3 


— 


— 


1 2 


5 


oz. 


Potassii sulphocarbolas 


■■ 


— 


— 


0 9 


0 2 


54 


oz. 


r\ • ' 1 1 11 1 • 

Qumm. hydrochlor.-bi. 


0 3 


— 


— 


1 2 


6 


oz. 


Potassii sulphocyanidum 




— 


— 


0 11 


0 2 


90 


oz. 


Quinin. hypophosphis . . 


0 4 


— 


— 


2 0 


39 


lb. 






4 10 


1 5 


0 5 


0 1 


69 


oz. 


Quinin. phosphas 


0 3 


— 


— 


1 6 


16 


lb. 


Potassii tartras acidus . . 




2 0 


0 7 


0 3 


— 


66 


oz. 


Quinin. salicylas 


0 3 


— 


— 


1 6 


12 


lb. 


Potassii tartras acidus 92% 




71b. 


11 0 


— 


— 


35 


oz. 


Qumm. sulphas . . 


0 2 


— 


— 


0 10 


















40 


oz. 


Qumm. sulphas acidus . . 


0 2 


— 


— 


0 11 


66 


oz. 


Procain. hyd. 




— 


— 


9 8 


1 5 


58 


oz. 


• • 11 LI 

Qumin. et ureae hydrochl. 


0 3 


— 


— 


1 3 


12 


gm. 


Proflavinum 




per 




0 2 


— 


66 


oz. 


Quinin. urethane 


— 


— 


8 9 


1 6 


85 


20 


Prolan pellets . . 






9 6 


tube 




87 


oz. 


Quinin. valerianas 


0 4 


— 


— 


1 8 


13 


10 


Prominal tablets 


B 




1 6 


tube 


















45 


oz. 


Protargol 




— 


— 


— 


1 1 






R 










22 


oz. 


Protargol granulate 


•• 


— 





3 3 


0 6 


11 


lb. 




1 5 


0 6 


0 2 


— 


2! 


lb. 









0 10 


0 3 




20 


lb. 


Red squill compound . . 


2 6 


0 9 


0 3 


— 


84 


lb. 


Pulv. acetaniiidi co. 




— 


3 0 


0 10 


0 2 


8 


lb. 




1 0 


0 4 


0 1 


— . 


27 


lb. 


Pulv. alkalinus (Maclean's) 




— 


1 0 


0 4 





11 


lb. 


Resin, flav. pulv. 


1 5 


0 6 


0 2 


— 


26 


lb. 


Pulv. aloes cap c. canella 







0 11 


0 4 





11 


oz. 


Resorcinol 


— 


— 


1 8 


0 3 


48 


lb. 


Pulv. aloes c. canella (super.) 




— 


1 9 


0 6 


0 1 


20 


25c.c. 


Radiostoleum 


— 


— 


3 6 


0 8 


48 


lb. 


Pulv. amygdalae co'. 







1 9 


0 6 


0 1 


27 


oz. 


Resorclni acetas 


— 


- 


4 0 


0 8 


48 


lb. 


Pulv. antimonialis 




— 


— 


0 6 


0 1 


28 


lb. 


Rhei rhizoma Ang. pulv. 


— 


1 0 


0 4 


— 


264 


lb. 


Pulv. aromaticus co. 







9 7 


2 7 


0 5 


264 


lb. 


Rhei rhiz. " E. 1." elect. 


— 


9 5 


2 9 


0 5 


32 


lb. 


Pulv. bismuth, co. N.I.F. 




— 


1 2 


0 4 




210 


lb. 


Khei rhiz. h. I. (tnmmed) . . 


— 


7 8 


2 4 


0 4 


54 


lb. 


Pulv. catechu co. 




— 


2 0 


0 7 


0 1 


156 


lb. 


Rhei rhiz. " E. I." sec. 


— 


5 7 


1 7 


0 3 


60 


lb. 


Pulv. cinnamomi co. 




— 


2 2 


0 8 


0 2 


loz 


lb. 


Rhei rhiz. " L I." pulv. elect.. . 


— 


S 10 


1 8 


0 3 


90 


lb. 


Pulv. conf . aromat. 






3 3 


0 11 


0 2 


120 


lb. 


Khei rhiz. t. 1. pulv. sec . . 




4 3 


1 2 


0 2 


16 


lb. 


Pulv. creta aromaticus . . 






0 7 


0 3 




84 


lb. 


Rhei rhiz. E. I. pulv. . . 




3 0 


0 10 


0 2 


36 


lb. 


Pulv. cretae aromat. c. op. B, ex F 




1 4 


0 5 


0 1 


63 


dr. 


Rhubidii iodidum 








9 2 


48 


oz. 


Pulv. elaterini co. 








7 0 


1 3 


20 


lb. 


Ringworm oint. (vet.) P.L.F . , 


2 6 


0 9 






15 


lb. 


Pulv. glycyrrhizffi co. . . 




2 0 


0 7 


0 3 


0 1 


14 


lb. 




1 8 


0 6 


0 2 






Pulv. glycyrrh. co. 4-oz. kali 






0 11 






36 


lb. 


Rouge, jewellers 


4 6 


1 4 


0 5 




7 


oz. 


Pulv. ipecacuanhsE et opii B, ex f 






1 1 


0 2 


192 


lb. 


Rosae pet. Ang. . . 




6 10 


2 0 




36 


lb. 


Pulv. jalapae co 






1 4 


0 5 


0 1 


i 96 


lb. 






3 0 


0 10 





■I 



1 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



21 



Price 


Cost 


Se — So 


Sellinc Prica 


1 




1 dr 






16 oz 


4 oz 


1 




1 dr 


>. 


d. 


«. I 


d. 


per 




f. d'. 


.. d. 


s. 












24 


lb. 


Sennae fol. Alex. pulv. . . 


3 0 


0 11 


0 


4 


— 








30 


lb. 


Sennae fol. Tinnev. 


3 9 


1 1 


0 


4 


— 


0 


1 


1 2 


18 


lb. 


Sennae fol. Tinnev. pulv. 


2 3 


0 8 


0 


3 


— 


0 


1 


1 0 


96 


lb. 


Sennae fructus Alex, (picked) . . 


12 0 


3 5 


1 


0 


— 


0 


1 


— 


18 


lb. 


Sennae fructus Tinnev. . . 


2 3 


0 8 


0 


3 


— 


1 lb. 


2 8 


54 


lb. 


Serpentariae rhizoma 


— 


2 0 


0 


7 


0 1 


0 


2 


— 


40 


lb. 


Sevum benzoatum . • 


— 


1 6 


0 


5 


— 


0 


3 


— 


36 


lb. 


Sevum prasparatum ,\ . . 


— 


1 5 


0 


5 


— 


0 


2 


— 


11 


oz. 


Sevum phosphoratum . . 


— 


— 


1 


8 


0 4 


1 


4 


— 


28 


lb. 


Shampoo pdr. (borax soap) 


— 


1 0 


0 


4 


— 


1 


0 


— 


21 


lb. 


Shampoo pdr. (coconut soap) . . 


2 8 


0 10 


0 


3 


— 


0 


9 


0 2 


36 


lb. 


Shellac alb. . • . • . . 


4 6 


1 4 


0 


5 


— 


0 


3 


— 


26 


lb. 


Shellac aurant. . . . . . . 


3 0 


0 11 


0 


3 


— 


0 


3 


— 


18 


lb. 


Shellac aurant. sec. 


2 3 


0 8 


0 


3 


— 


0 


2 


— 


19 


lb. 


Sherbet P.L.F 


2 5 


0 9 


0 


3 


— 


0 


5 


0 1 


4 


oz. ■ 


Silica pur. prscip* 


— 


— 


0 


8 


— 


0 


3 


— 


6 


lb. 


Silica coml. ' . . . . . . 


0 10 


0 3 


0 


1 


— 


0 


5 


— 


10 


lb. 


Smapis albae senuna . • 


1 3 


0 5 


0 


2 


— 


0 


9 


0 2 


















0 


2 


— 






Sodium 












0 


7 


— 


30 


lb. 


Soda caustica (sticks) pur. . • 


3 9 


1 2 


0 


4 


— 


0 


6 


— 


11 


lb. 


Soda caustica (gran, or Hake) . . 


1 5 


0 6 


0 


2 


— 


0 


2 


— 


15 


lb. 


Soda lime . . . . . . 


2 0 


0 7 


0 


2 


— 


0 


3 


— 


15 


lb. 


Sodii acetas pur. cryst. 


1 10 


0 7 


0 


2 


— 


0 


3 


— 


18 


oz. 


Sodii acetylsalicylas 


— 


— 


2 


8 


0 6 


2 


10 


0 5 


27 


lb. 


Sodu ammon. phos. . ■ . • 


— 


1 0 


0 


4 


— 


0 


3 


— 


6 


oz. 


Sodu arsenas anhyd. . . A, B 


— 


— 


0 11 


0 2 






1 1 


30 


oz. 


Sodii benzoas nat. . . • • 


— 


— 


4 


5 


0 8 


1 


2 


0 2 


36 


lb. 


Sodii benzoas artif. . . • . 


— 


1 4 


0 


5 


— 


6 


2 


1 6 


6 


lb. 


Sodii bicarb. (Howards) • ■ 


0 9 


0 3 


0 


2 


— 


0 


3 


— 


5 


lb. 


Sodii bicarb, opt. pulv, . • 


0 8 


0 3 


0 


1 


— 


0 


5 


, — 






Sodii bicarb, opt. pkd. . • . . 


— 


0 4i 


0 


li 


— 


0 


4 


— 


4 


lb. 


Sodii bicarb, coml. pulv* '. • 


0 6 


0 2 


0 


1 


— 






4 0 


264 


cwt. 


Sodii bicarb, coml. pulv. . . 


7 lb. 


1 8 


141b. 


3 0 


1 


6 


0 3 


11 


lb. 


Sodu bichromas • . 


1 6 


0 6 


0 


2 


• — 


1 


1 


0 2 


15 


lb. 


Sodu bisulphas pur. . • • . 


1 11 


0 7 


0 


2 


— 


0 


4 


— 


54 


lb. 


Sodii bitartras . . . . 


6 9 


2 0 


0 


7 


0 1 


0 


3 


9 6 


35 


lb. 


Sodu bromidum . • . . 


4 6 


1 4 


0 


5 


— 


0 


3 


— 


36. 


oz. 


Sod II cacodylas . ■ . • S 


— 


— 


5 


3 


0 9 


0 


3 


— 


3 


lb. 


Sodii carbolas . . • • • . 


— 


— 


0 


6 


0 1 


0 


2 


— 


5 


lb. 


Sodu carbonas cryst. . • . . 


0 8 


0 3 


0 


1 


— 


0 


3 


— 


8 


lb. 


Sodu carbonas exsic. . • . . 


1 0 


0 4 


0 


1 


— 


0 


5 


— 


3 


lb. 


Sodii carbonas coml. . ■ . . 


0 5 


0 2 


0 


1 


— 


0 


2 


— 


54 


oz. 


Sodii chaulmoo^as . . . . 


— 


— 






1 2 


0 


3 


— 


21 


lb. 


Sodii chlorate 


2 8 


0 9 


0 


3 


— 


0 


3 


— 


10 


lb. 


Sodii chloridum pur. . . . . 


1 3 


0 6 


0 


2 


— 


0 


3 


— 


14 


oz. 


Sodii cinnamas . . . . . . 


— 




2 


0 


0 4 


0 


7 


— 


35 


lb. 


Sodu citras . . . . . . 


4 5 


1 4 


0 


5 


0 1 


1 


8 


0 3 


38 


lb. 


Sodii citro-tartras efJ. . . . • 


4 9 


1 9 


0 


6 


— 


0 


4 


— 


30 


lb. 


Sodii cyanid. . • . . . . 


3 9 


1 1 


0 


4 


— 


0 


2 


— 


2 


oz. 


Sodu formas • • • . . • 


— 


— 


0 


4 


0 1 






— 


9 


oz. 


Sodu glycerophos. pulv. 


— 


— 


1 


4 


0 3 


0 


5 


— 


26 


oz. 


Sodu guaiacas . • . . . . 


— 


— 


3 


9 


0 8 


1 


9 


0 4 


42 


oz. 


Sodu hippuras . . . • . . 


— 


— 


6 


2 


1 0 


0 


5 


0 1 


54 


oz. 


Sodu hydnocarpas . . . . 


— 


— 


8 


0 


1 4 


0 


6 


0 1 


26 


lb. 


Sodu hydroxid. sticks . • 


— 


1 0 


0 


4 


— 


0 


3 


— 


6 


oz. 


Sodu hypophosphis • . . . 


— 


— 


0 


11 


0 2 


1 


1 


0 2 


4.5 


lb. 


Sodu hyposulphis opt. . . . . 


0 8 


0 3 


0 


1 


— 






3 5 


3 


lb. 


Sodu hyposulphis (photog.) . . 


0 5 


— 






— 


6 


2 


1 0 


11 


oz. 


Sodii lodidum . . . . . . 






1 


8 


0 3 


0 


7 


0 1 


6 


lb. 


Sodii lactas (syrupy) 






1 


3 


0 3 


0 


4 


0 1 


7.5 


oz. 


Sodii lith. cit. co. 






1 


2 


0 2 








21 


lb. 


Sodii manganas coml. 


2 9 


G 9 


0 


3 










18 


lb. 


Sodii metasulphis . . 


2 3 


0 8 


0 


3 










54 


oz. 


Sodii morrhuas . . 






8 


0 


1 4 


0 


5 




18 


lb. 


Sodii nitras pur. 




0 8 


0 


3 




0 


5 




4.5 


lb. 


Sodii nitras coml. 


0 7 


0 3 


0 


1 




0 


7 




18 


lb. 


Sodii nitris pur. cryst. . . 




0 8 


0 


S 


0 1 



Coit 



i. per 



OZ. 
oz. 
lb. 

lb. 
lb. 
lb. 



lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

3oz. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
oz. 

lb. 



lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

dr. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
dr. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

OZ. 

lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

OZ. 

dr. 

oz. 

lb. 

oz. 

100 

gross 

gross 

lb. 

lb. 

lb. 



Sa — Se 



Saccharinum 550 
Saccharinum solubile . . 
Saccharum pur. pulv. subtil. . 
Saccharum lactis (tins) . . 
Saccharum lactis pulv. . . 
Saccharum ustum Ang. 
Saccharum ustum exot. 
Sachet powder opt. (var.) P.L.F, 
Sachet powder sec. P.L.F. 

Safrol 

Sal aceto*. pulv. P.L.F. 
Sal acetos. pulv. 
Sal Carlsbad artif. N.F. 
Sal Qrol. fact. eff. pulv. 
Sal Cheltenham artif. . . 
Sal Harrogate, artif. 
Sal hepatica . . . . 
Sal Kissingen artif. 
Sal limonis P.L.F. 
Sal limon. (non-toxic) P.L.F, 
Sal prunella glob. 
Sal prunella glob. parv. 
Sal Vichy artif. . . 
Salicinum 

Saline effervesc. P.L.F. 
Salipyrine 
Salol .. .. 
Salophen 

Sambuci flores sice 
Sandaraca 
Sanguinariae radix 
Sanguinarin. 

Sanguis draconis pulv. opt. 
Sanguis draconis pulv. sec. 
Santal. flav. lig. pulv. . . 
Santoninum 
Sapo albus pulv. 
Sap. ale. sol. indust. 
Sapo animalis 
Sapo animal, pulv. 
Sapo arsen. (taxid.) P.L.F. 
Sapo Cast, mottled 
Sapo " coconut oil 
Sapo durus 
Sapo durus pulv. 
Sapo ethereal P.L.F. 
Sapo Hebra rect. 
Sapo kalinus 
Sapo mollis viridis 
Sapo mollis coml. opt. . . 

Sapo Napol 

Saponinum 
Sarsae radix Jam. 
Sarsae radix Jam. incis. 
Sassafras radix incis. 
Scammoniae resinae pulv. 
Scammoniae virgin, pulv. 
Scarlet red 
Schlippe's salt . . 
Scilla pulv. 
Sedobrol tablets 
Seltzogene charges 3-pt. 
Seltzogene charges 5-pt. 
Senegae rad. 
Senegae rad. pulv. 
Senna folia Alex. opt. . . 



per 
per 

ilb. 

1 9 

2 3 
1 3 



1 9 
4 6 

2 3 
4 2 

1 6 



1 9 

2 4 

2 3 

3 0 



3 0 

4 10 



13 6 

3 6 

per 
2 3 

1 7 

2 3 

4 6 

1 10 

3 0 

2 3 

3 6 



3 0 
2 0 

1 2 

4 6 

4 10 
6 0 

2 3 



7 6 

doz. 
doz. 
doz. 



6 9 



4oz. 
«. d. 



gr. 

0 2i 



3 4 
2 2 
0 11 
0 8 

0 7 

1 4 

0 8 

1 3 



1 0 



0 11 

1 5 
1 0 

5 4 
3 11 
1 0 
gr- 
0 8 
0 10 
0 6 



1 0 

0 8 



0 11 
0 7 

0 4 

1 4 

1 5 
1 10 
0 9 



2 2 



22 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



October 5, 1935 



Cost 


So — Sp 

Sodium — (cont.) 


Selling Price 


Cost 


Sp — Sy 

Spiritus — (cont.) 


Selling Pric« 


16 oz. 
». d. 


4oz. 
f. d. 


1 oz. 
J. d. 


1 dr. 
». d. 


16 02. 

1. d. 






i dr. 

s, a. 


i. 


1 

per 


d. 


per 


4oz. 
J. d. 


1 oz. 
s d 


24 


OZ. 


Sodii nitroprussidum . . 





_ 


3 6 


0 7 


24 


lb. 


Spt. saponis kalini meth. 




3 0 


0 11 


0 3 




90 


oz. 


Sodii nucleinas . . 






12 10 


1 10 


72 


gal. 


Spt. sick-room (Surgical) 




pint 


1 2 






42 


lb. 


Sodil oleas 




1 6 


0 5 




54 


gal. 


Spt. vini meth. 64 o.p. (min 


1)" 


0 10 


0 3 


0 1 




26 


lb. 


Sodii oxalas . . . . C 




1 0 


0 4 




41 


gal. 


Spt. vini meth. 64o.p.(10gal.lots) 


pint 


0 6 






24 


lb. 


Sodii perboras . . 


3 0 


0 11 


0 4 


0 1 


29 


gal. 


Spt. vini meth. 64 o.p. (indust.) 










39 


lb. 


Sodii peroxidum 




1 5 


0 5 


0 1 






no call lots^ 




pint 


0 7 


gai. 


4 0 


66 


lb. 


Sodii persulphas 




2 4 


0 8 


0 2 


40 


gal. 


Sh.'^iit villi IlICLlla \lIlULIOl«^ \Jt 


o.p. 


pint 


0 8 






13 


lb. 


Sodii phosphas " pea " ' 


1 9 


0 6 


0 2 




















14 


lb. 


Sodii phosphas " feathery " 


2 0 


0 8 


0 2 




28 


80 






doz. 


0 6 






16 


lb. 


Sodii phosph. pulv. 


2 3 


0 8 


0 3 




57 


lb. 


r^fj^nni nYifi niilv mvt^i c\t\\ 

k^iaillll UAIU* LJUlVs V,V/liU> VfJla 




7 2 


2 1 


0 8 




22 


lb. 


Sodii phosph. pulv. exsic. 




0 10 


0 3 




66 


lb. 


^franniim trrnn r>tir 

>— 'LtUIII Ulll KlcUli uui ■ • • 




8 3 


2 4 


0 8 


0 2 


24 


lb. 


Sodii phosph. acidus 




0 11 


0 4 




48 


lb. 


>— 'lafjiiioagi lu ouiii* • • 






1 9 


0 6 




36 


lb. 


Sodii phosph. eff. 


4 6 


1 4 


0 5 




57 


lb. 


vJiujJiiiaagl Id oclli* (JUIV** • 






2 1 


0 8 




24 


lb. 


Sodii phosph. (tribasic) 




1 0 


0 4 




13 


gm. 


Stovflinc • ■ 












17 


lb. 


Sodil et potas. tart. pulv. 


2 2 


0 8 


0 3 




18 


lb. 


3tr3monii folici 




2 3 


0 8 


0 3 




18 


lb. 


Sodii pyrophosph. 


2 3 


0 9 


0 3 




18 


11- . 


Str£iiTionii foil pulv* • ■ 


c 


2 3 


0 8 


0 3 




32 


lb. 


Sodii salicylas cryst. 




1 2 


0 4 


0 1 


6 


oz. 


^^tl*^ntII KrnmiHiinn /*i*VQfr 

wLJUIlLll L/J \JIIiIUUllI \.l V^L* 








0 11 


0 2 


30 


oz. 


Sodii salicylas nat. 






4 5 


0 8 


8 


oz. 






_ 


_ 


1 2 


0 2 


4.3 


lb. 


Sodii silicatis solut. (wgt.) 


0 8 


0 3 






20 


oz. 


T^frnnf 11 loHif liim 




_ 




3 0 


0 6 


36 


lb. 


Sodii stearas 




1 4 


0 5 




18 


oz. 


Strontii Inct&s ■ ■ • • 




_ 


_ 


2 8 


0 6 


18 


oz. 


Sodii succinas . . 






2 8 


0 6 


17 


lb. 


r^i'^rtni'ii nifrvnc i^/^ml rMiiw 
OLIUIILIJ iJlllaa v.Ulllla ^UiVa 




2 3 


0 8 


0 3 




5 


lb. 


Sodii sulphas " pea " . . 


0 8 


0 3 


0 2 




18 


oz. 










2 8 


0 6 


5 


lb. 


Sodil sulphas " feathery " 


0 9 


0 3 


0 1 




9 


gr. 


ti^ll UUliatlLlllllLlill • • 




per 


gr. 


1 4 




6 


lb. 


Sodii sulph. pulv. 


0 10 


0 4 


0 1 




53 


oz. 


Oil y Cllllllla Ciysla • • 








7 9 


1 2 


7 


lb. 


Sodii suiph. pulv. exsic. 


1 0 


0 5 


0 2 




53 


oz. 


KjLiyi..lla |jUlVa a a • • 







_ 


7 9 


1 2 


216 


CWt. 


Sodii sulph. coml. cryst. 


0 4 




7 lb. 


1 8 


50 


oz. 


••-'1-1 y ^11 • iiy ui uwiiiui lUtnii 


B 





_ 


7 4 


1 1 


294 


CWt. 


Sodii sulph. coml. pulv. 


0 5 




7 lb. 


2 4 


50 


oz. 


hJLiyL.ll> Inllaa a • • • 







_ 


7 4 


1 1 


27 


lb. 


Sodii sulph. eff. 


3 6 


1 0 


0 4 




50 


oz. 


Strych. Siilphss a • 


B 








7 4 


1 1 


176 


cwt. 


Sodii sulph. vet. 


7 lb. 


1 5 


14 lb. 


2 8 


27 


20 


Stypticm t&l^Icts a • 


B 


doz. 


1 10 






21 


lb. 


Sodii sulphidum cryst. . . 




0 9 


0 3 




29 


20 


tviiyi^iui lauicia a • • a 


B 


doz. 


2 1 


_ 


_ 


5 


lb. 


Sodii sulphis 


0 9 


0 3 


0 1 




61 


oz. 


kJi.yiaL.Ujl a ■ ■ ■ a • 








_ 


1 6 


32 


lb. 


Sodii sulphocarbolatis pulv. 




1 2 


0 4 


0 1 


84 


lb. 


Styrsuc prsp^rfltus • • 


" 


_ 


3 1 


0 11 


0 2 


6 


oz. 


Sodii sulphocyanid. 






0 9 


0 2 


48 


lb. 


SUCCUS ^lll a a < • 







1 9 


0 6 




36 


lb. 


Sodii tartras (neutral) . . 




1 4 


0 5 


0 1 


39 


lb. 


kJUL.L.Ua UCIlaUUIilleC a • 


c 





1 5 


0 5 


_ 


18 


oz. 


Sodii tauroglycocholas B.P.C. . . 






2 8 


0 5 


38 


lb. 


>>^Li\.wua ^<jiiil • • • • 


c 





1 5 


0 5 





66 


lb. 


Sodii tungstas pur. 






0 8 


0 2 


48 


lb. 


SuCCUS digitalis a a a • 






1 10 


0 7 




20 


oz. 


Sodii valerianas . . 






2 11 


0 5 


42 


lb. 


Succus ^lycyrrKiZGB (Sol&zzi) 


" 





1 6 


0 5 



















16 


lb. 


Succus glycyrrKizfic (block) 




2 0 


0 7 


0 3 


0 1 


108 


lb. 


Sol. eetheris nitrosi (1-7) 




3 6 


1 0 




36 


lb. 


If iQ nvnRPVnmi 
i_'Li^\,U9 iiy Lfav-jr cuiii ■ • 


c 




1 4 


0 5 




129 


oz. 


Sozoiodol, hydrarg. 








2 2 


108 


gal. 






1 6 


0 6 


0 2 





54 


oz. 


Sozoiodol, zinc. . . 








1 4 


108 


gal. 


Succus limonis . . 




1 6 


0 6 


0 2 





14 


dr. 


Sparteins sulphas . . B 








2 0 


32 


lb. 


Succus scoparii . . 






1 3 


0 5 





72 


lb. 


Spigelia . . 




2 7 


0 9 


0 2 


32 


lb. 


Succus taraxaci . . 







1 3 


0 5 

















28 


oz. 


Sulphonal 


c 






4 1 


0 7 






Spiritus 










9 


lb. 


Sulphur lotum . . . . 




1 2 


0 4 


0 li 




75 


lb. 


Spiritus eetheris . . 




2 5 


0 8 


0 2 


12 


lb. 


Sulphur prascipitatum . . 






0 6 


0 2 


_ 


96 


lb. 


Spt. eetheris comp. 




3 2 


0 10 


0 2 


5 


lb. 


Sulphur rotundum 




0 9 


0 3 


0 1 





67 


lb. 


Spt. aatheris nitrosi 


7 6 


2 2 


0 7 


0 1 


6 


lb. 


Sulphur sublimatum 




0 9 


0 3 


0 1 





24 


lb. 


Spt. eetheris nit. substit. P.L.F. 


3 0 








264 


cwt. 


Sulphur sublimatum sec. 




7 lb. 


2 1 


141b. 


3 10 


52 


lb. 


Spt. ammonia; aromaticus 


5 9 


1 7 


0 6 


0 ! 


5 


lb. 


Sulphur vivum . . 




0 9 


0 3 










Spt. ammon. ar. pled. (std. bot.) 




2 6 


% ii 


1 6 


312 


cwt. 






71b. 


2 4 








% 


lb. 


Spt. ammoniae fetidus . . 




3 2 


0 10 


0 2 


18 


lb. 


Sulphur hair wash P.L.F. 






8 oz. 


1 4 





24 


oz. 


Spt. anisi 






3 4 


0 6 


6 


lb. 


Sulphur wash P.L.F. . . 




1 0 









66 


lb. 


Spt. armoracioe co. 




2 2 


0 8 


0 2 


26 


lb. 


Sulphuris chloridum Qiq.) 






1 6 


0 6 





96 


lb. 


Spt. cajuputi 




3 2 


0 11 


0 2 


20 


oz. 


Sulphuris iodidum 









3 0 


0 6 


78 


lb. 


Spt. camphorae . . 




2 7 


0 9 


0 2 


















68 


lb. 


Spt. chloroformi 




2 2 


0 8 


0 2 






Suppositoria {see Pricing 










33 


oz. 


Spt. cinnamomi 






4 4 


0 8 






Prescriptions) 










102 


lb. 


Spt. juniperi 




3 5 


1 0 


0 2 






Syrupi 




1 6 








18 


oz. 


Spt. juniperi co. P.L. . . 







2 6 


0 5 


o 

o 


lb. 


Syrupus . . 




0 6 


0 2 


— 


630 


lb. 


Spt. lavanduiae Ang. 






4 9 


0 9 


21 


lb. 


Syr. ac. hydriodici 






1 0 


0 4 




426 


lb. 


Spt. lavanduiae exot. . . .< 




15 0 


4 2 


0 7 


28 


lb. 


Syr. alii 






1 6 


0 5 




32 


oz. 


Spt. menthae pip. Ang. 






4 3 


0 8 


16 


lb. 


Syr. althaes 






0 10 


0 4 




312 


lb. 


Spt. menthae pip. exot. . . . . 




10 6 


2 9 


0 5 


24 


lb. 


Syr. anisi 






1 3 


0 5 




26 


oz. 


Spt. myristicae 






3 9 


0 7 


42 


lb. 


Syr. apomorphinee B.P.C. 


c 




2 0 


0 7 


0 1 


126 


lb. 


Spt. nucis juglandis 




4 0 


1 1 


0 2 


78 


lb. 


Syr. aromaticus . . 






3 7 


1 0 


0 2 


300 


lb. 


Spt. rosmarini exot. 




10 0 


2 8 


0 5 


33 


lb. 


Syr. aurantii 






1 7 


0 5 




62 


lb. 




6 9 


2 0 


0 7 




24 


lb. 


Syr. aurantii floris 






1 2 


0 4 





October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



23 



Coat 


Synipi — (cont.) 


Sellins Prica 


Cost 


oy — lu 

Syrnpi — (cont.) 


Sellins Price 


16 oz. 
.. d. 


4 oz 

». d. 


1 

s. 


"d. 


1 dr 
>. d. 


16 oz. 
.. d. 


4 oz 

1. d. 


1 oz 

J. d. 


1 dr 
1. d. 


i. 


per 


d. 


per 


54 


If 

lb. 


Syr. broinoformi (Martind.) 




— 


2 3 


0 


8 


— 


ji) 


lU 

Id. 


byr. sennae Alex. 


— 


1 5 


0 5 


— 


27 


IL 

lb. 


Syr. butyl-chloral hydratis 




— 


1 4 


0 


7 


0 1 


IR 


Ik 
lb. 


byr. sennae 


— 


0 11 


0 4 


— 


28 


lb. 


Syr. calcii chlor. B.P.C. 




— 


1 6 


0 


6 


— 


jj 


Ik 
lb. 


byr. sennae Iruct. Alex. 


— 


1 S 


0 5 


0 1 


10 


lb. 


Syr. calcii hypophosphitis 




— 


1 0 


0 


4 


— 


97 


lb. 


byr. tamanndi . . 


— 


1 1 


0 4 


— 


16 


lb. 


Syr. calcii lactophosphatis 




— 


0 10 


0 


4 


0 1 


1 1 
1 1 


lb. 


byr. tolutanus . . 


— 


0 8 


0 3 


— 




lb. 


Syr. calcii lactophosphatis c, ferro 


— 


1 2 


0 


4 


— 




Ik 
lb. 


byr. triplex D.r.C . . C 


— 


1 1 


0 4 


— 


18 


lb. 


Syr. camphorae co. 


C 


— 


0 10 


0 


4 


— 


9A 


Ik 
lb. 


byr. tussilaginis . . 


— 


1 4 


0 5 


— 


54 


lb. 


Syr. cascaree aromaticus 




— 


2 10 


0 10 


0 2 


10 


Ik 
lb. 


byr. violae 


— 


0 10 


0 4 


— 


24 


lb. 


Syr. chloral 


C 


— 


1 1 


0 


4 


0 1 


le 
\j 


Ik 
lb. 


c* ■ *1 • 

byr. zmgibens . . 


— 


0 10 


0 3 


— 


48 


lb. 


Syr. cocillanae co. 


C 


— 


2 2 


0 


7 


0 1 






1 










87 


16 oz. 


Syr. cocillanae co. (P.D.) 


C 


— 


3 3 


0 11 


0 2 


1 AA 


oz. 


T* 1 J" r /D \ 


— 


— 


13 0 


2 0 


3j 


lb. 


Syr. codeinae phosphatis 


C 


— 


1 6 


0 


5 


0 1 


jO 


'i oz. 


1 aka diastase elixir 


— 


4 6 


1 2 


0 2 


27 


lb. 


Syr. croci B.P.C. 




— 


1 4 


0 


5 


0 1 




A 

4 oz. 


T* IT. 1" 

1 aka diastase liq. 


— 


4 0 


1 0 


0 2 


42 


11 

lb. 






— 


2 0 


0 


7 


— 


77 


1 AA 

lull 


T" 1 J' Ll i. - 91 

I aka diastase tablets gr. zj 


doz. 


1 3 


— 


— 


4o 


lb. 


Syr. eucalypti gummi . . 




— 


2 2 


0 


7 


0 1 


99 
ZZ 


ea. 


nr I 


2 9 


each 


— 


— 


24 


IL 

lb. 


Syr. ferri bromidi 




— 


1 3 


0 


5 


0 1 


10 


Ik 
lb. 


T" 1 i 


2 3 


0 8 


0 2i 


— 


51 


IL 

lb. 


Syr. ferri bromidi c. quin. 




— 


2 4 


0 


8 


0 2 


J.J 


Ik 
lb. 


1 1 


0 8 


0 2i 


0 1 


— 


4o 


IL 

lb. 


Syr. ferri bromidi c. quin. 


et 












1 A 
ID 


IL 

lb. 


T" 11 

1 allow . . 


1 3 


0 5 


0 li 


— 






strych. . . . . 


C 


— 


2 2 


0 


8 


0 2 




IL 

lb. 


T" • J' 1 

1 amanndi pulpa 


4 9 


1 5 


0 5 


— 


in 
19 


IL 

lb. 






— 


1 0 


0 


4 


— 


17 

1/ 


IL 

lb. 


lamanndus W.J. 


2 3 


0 8 


0 3 


— 


Oft 

2U 


IL 

lb. 


Syr. ferri hypophosphitis 




— 


1 0 


0 


4 


— 


94 


oz. 


T" IL ■ 

lannalbin 


— 


— 


3 6 


0 6 


lo 


IL 

lb. 






— 


0 10 


0 


3 


— 


9A 
ZD 


9A 

zU 


T" IL* t LI 1 71 

I annalbin tablets gr. /i 


doz. 


1 6 


— 


— 


24 


IL 

lb. 


Syr. ferri lactophosphatis 




— 


1 3 


0 


5 


— 


Z'J 


Ligm 


1 annotorm 


— 


— 


— 


0 7 


13 


IL 

lb. 


Syr. ferri phosphatis . . . 




2 9 


0 10 


0 


4 


■ — 


9A 

zo 


IL 

lb. 


T" • J' A ' * 

1 araxaci radix Ang. incis. 


3 3 


1 0 


0 4 


— 


12 


IL 

lb. 


Syr. ferri phosphatis co. 




2 3 


0 9 


0 


3 


— 


aA 
io 


IL 

lb. 


nr _ L 


— 


1 3 


0 5 


— 






Syr. ferri phosphatis co. pkd. 




— 


1 0 


s 


vii] 


1 9 


79 
IL 


Ik 
lb. 


I erebinth. Lanad. 


— 


2 7 


0 9 


— 


3o 


!L 

lb. 


Syr. ferri phosphatis c. mang. 




— 


1 6 


0 


5 


— 


14 


oz. 


nr 1 • . I 1 • 
1 erebmth. cnia. 


— 


— 


2 0 


0 4 


32 


IL 

lb. 


Syr. ferri phosphatis c. quin. 




— 


1 7 


0 


5 


— 


1 c 

15 


IL 

lb. 


1 erebmth. Venet. tact. 


2 0 


0 8 


0 3 


— 


1o 


IL 

lb. 


Syr.ferri phosph.c.quin.et strych. 


— 


0 10 


0 


4 


— 


a9 

iL 


Ik 
lb. 


1 • .1 \? L 

I erebinth. Venet. ver. . . 


4 0 


1 2 


0 4 


— 


21 


IL 

lb. 


Syr. flci 




3 4 


1 0 


0 


4 


— 


c 
0 


oz. 




— 


— 


0 11 


0 2 


30 


IL 

lb. 


Syr. format, co . . . 


C 


— 


1 6 


0 


5 


— 


0 


oz. 


nr 1 


— 


— 


1 0 


0 2 


12 


11 

lb. 


Syr. glucosi 




— 


0 8 


0 


3 


— ■ 


c 
J 


oz. 


np ■ 1 
1 erpmol . . 


— 


— 


0 9 


0 2 


30 


IL 

lb. 


Syr. glycerophosphatum flavus 




S 0 


1 5 


0 


5 


0 1 


aA 
io 


IL 

lb. 


1 erra rosae 


3 9 


1 2 


0 4 


— 


24 


lb. 


Syr. glyceroph. c. form. B.P.C. 


4 0 


1 3 


0 


4 


— 


I AQ 

lUo 


oz. 


Tetronal C 


— 


— 


— 


2 10 


1 7 
1/ 


IL 

lb. 


Syr. glycerophos. co. B.P.C. 


C 


2 10 


0 11 


0 


4 


— 


79 
IL 


oz. 




— 


— 


— 


1 8 


48 


It 

lb. 


Syr. glycerophosph. co. 


c. 












1 on 

lo9 


oz. 




— 


— 


— 


5 8 






medulla rub. . . ' . . 


C 


8 0 


2 4 


0 


8 


0 2 


OA 


0 


'T^ 1 • I 1 A 

1 heelin ampoules I.U .. 


10 0 


per 


box 


— 


24 


lb. 


Syr. glycerophos. co. (Robin) 


c 


— 


1 3 


0 


4 


— 


OA 

yu 


/■ 
0 


Theelin amps, in oil 


10 0 


per 6 


amps. 


— 


24 


IL 

lb. 


Syr. hemidesmi . . 




— 


1 3 


0 


4 


— 




9A 
ZD 


Theelol capsules 


11 6 


— 


— 


— 


72 


IL 

lb. 


Syr. hydrobrom. co. (Hewlett) 




— 


3 5 


0 11 


0 2 


I r 
IP 


OZ. 


Theobromina 


— 




2 3 


0 4 


1^ 
1^ 


1! 

lb. 


Syr. hypophos. co. B.P.C. 




2 2 


0 8 


0 


3 


— 


9Q 
ZO 


oz. 


Theobrominae acetylsal. 




— 


4 1 


0 7 






Syr. hypophos. co. pkd. 




— 


1 0 


g 


ij- 


0 8 


1 A 


oz. 


Theobrominae-sod. acet. 


— 


— 


2 0 


0 4 


it 


IL 

lb. 


Syr. iodotannicus 




— 


1 10 


0 


7 


0 1 


1 

\i 


oz. 


Theobrominac-sod. sal. 


— 


— 


1 U 


0 4 


OQ 

2o 


lb. 


Syr. ipecacuanhas 




— 


1 3 


0 


5 


— 


99 
Li 


oz. 


1 heobromin. et sodu benz. 


— 


— 


3 3 


0 7 


21 


IL 

lb. 


Syr. limonis 




3 6 


1 0 


0 


4 


— 


ao 


oz. 


1 heobromin. et sodii lod. 


— 


— 


5 9 


0 10 


1Q 

1o 


IL 

lb. 


Syr. marrubii 




3 3 


1 0 


0 


4 


— 


Z4 


oz. 


Theobromin. salicyl 


— 


— 


3 6 


0 6 


33 


lb. 






5 6 


1 9 


0 


6 


— 


144 


oz. 


Theocinae-sod. acet. 


— 


— 


— 


3 5 


lo 


IL 

lb. 


Syr. papaveris albae 




— 


0 10 


0 


4 


— 


CO 

5o 


CA 

50 


Theominal tablets . . C 


doz. 


2 2 


— 


— 


ifl 


lb. 


Syr. picis liquidae 




— 


1 0 


0 


4 


— 


Vo 


oz. 


Theophyllin.-sod. acet. 


— 


— 


— 


2 0 


30 


IL 

lb. 


Syr. pini B.P.C. 




— 


1 5 


0 


5 


— 


6 


11 

lb. 




— 


— 


0 3 


0 1 


30 


IL 

lb. 


Syr. pruni cerasi 




— 


1 9 


0 


6 


— 


33.6 


50c.c. 


T'l '1 I 


3 6 


per 


tube 


— 


1 o 

12 


11 

lb. 


Syr. pruni serot 




— 


0 8 


0 


3 


— 


37.6 


lOOcc 


Thilocologne 


4 9 


per 


tube 


— 


39 


lb. 


Syr. quinina2 hypophositis 




— 


2 0 


0 


7 


— 


65 


oz. 


Thiocol. . , 


~ 


— 


— 


1 7 


3y 


lb. 


Syr. quininae iodidi 




— 


2 0 


0 


7 


— 


43 


6 oz. 




— 


— 


0 11 


0 2 




lb. 


Syr. quininaephosph. 




— 


2 0 


0 


7 


— 


11 


Z5 




doz. 


1 8 


— 


— 


1 7 

17 


lb. 


Syr. rhamni 




— 


0 10 


0 


4 


— 


28 


oz. 


Thioform . . 


— 


— 


3 6 


0 8 




IL 

lb. 


Syr. rhamni frang. 




— 


1 6 


0 


5 


— 


^ A 

60 


oz. 


Thiol 


— 


— 


7 6 


1 6 


1 >i 
14 


IL 

lb. 


Syr. rhei. . 




— 


0 10 


0 


3 


— 


30 


gm. 


T'l '1 * .III !1 

1 hiol. amino, methyl, glyox. hyd. 


0 4 


per 


grain 


— 




Ill 

ID. 






2 8 


0 10 


0 


4 


— 


^fi 
io 


oz. 




— 


— 


4 3 


0 8 


21 


lb. 








1 0 


0 


4 


0 1 


12 


oz. 








1 9 


0 3 


51 


lb. 








2 6 


0 


8 


0 2 


24 


oz. 


Thorn nitras pur. . . 






3 6 


0 6 


63 


lb. 


Syr. robor. (Roberts), unstd. f1. 




2 3 


0 


7 


G 2 


18 


lb. 


Thus 


2 3 


0 8 


0 3 




36 


lb. 








1 6 


0 


5 




12 


oz. 








1 9 


0 3 


35 


lb. 


Syr. rubi fructicosi 






1 6 


0 


5 




84 


oz. 


Thymol carbonas 






12 4 


1 0 


27 


lb. 


Syr. rubi idaei . . 






1 3 


0 


4 




36 


oz. 


Thymol iodidum 






5 3 


0 9 


27 


lb. 








1 3 


0 


4 




42 


oz. 








6 4 


1 0 


11 


lb. 








0 8 


0 


3 




24 


lb. 




3 0 


0 11 


0 3 




38 


lb. 








1 10 


0 


7 




84 


lb. 






3 3 


0 10 





24 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



October 5, 1935 



Cost 


Ti 


Selling Price 


Cost 


Ti 

Tincturse — (cent.) 


SellinK Price 






1 oz 

f. d. 


1 dr. 
«. d. 


16 oz 
I. d. 




1 oz 

t. d. 


1 dr. 

1. d. 


• 

a. 


per 


16 oz 
f. d. 


4 oz 
>. d. 


d. 


per 




















AA 
00 


Ik 
Id. 


1 r. digitalis . . . . 




— 


2 5 


0 9 


n 

V 


9 
4 


68 


lb. 


Tr. aconiti . . . • 


Q 


— 


2 5 


0 9 


n 


9 


0 

7 


OZ. 


Tr. droserae rot. . . 




— 


— 


1 4 


n 
U 






lb. 


Tr. aconiti Fleming . . 


D 
D 




3 3 


0 11 


n 
u 


9 


S7 
0/ 


Ik 
ID. 


Tr ^r^n*^ P P 'ftl 

1 r. ergotae Ij.r. oj 


Q 


— 


3 0 


0 10 


U 


4 


87 


lb. 


Tr. adonis vernalis . . 




— 


3 0 


0 10 


n 


0 


on 


Ik 

Jb. 


Tr. ergotae ammoniata . . 




— 


3 1 


0 11 


n 


9 


q 


OZ. 


Tr. alii . . B ■ . • 




— 


— 


1 4 


n 
u 


0' 


7 


OZ. 


Tr. eucalypti fol. . • 




— 


— 


1 1 


n 


It 




lb. 


Tr. aloes . . . . 




— 


1 7 


0 5 


n 
u 




Q 


OZ- 


Tr. eucalypti gum. . . 




— 


— 


1 4 


u 




84 


lb. 


i r. aioes co. o.r . • 




— 


3 3 


0 11 


n 
u 


9 
4 


7 


oz. 


nr 

1 r. euonymi . . . . 




— 


— 


1 1 


n 
u 


9 




lb 


Tr. ammoniae co. B.P.C 




7 0 


2 0 


0 7 






in 


OZ. 


T * * *J 

1 r. euonymm. vine. . . 




— 


— 


1 5 


fl 
u 


0 


/ J 


lb. 


Tr. antbemidis . . . • 




— 


2 8 


0 9 


n 
\l 


9 


77 


Ik 
lb. 


Tr, cuphorbiae . . . . 




— 


2 7 


0 9 


n 
u 


9 
It 




IK 


Tr. antipenodica 3.P.C 




— 


3 0 


0 10 


n 
u 


9 


"izl 


Ik 
lb. 


Tr. fern acetatis • . 




— 


2 0 


0 7 


n 


1 




lb. 


.-p . 

1 r. apocyni . . . . 




— 


2 10 


0 10 


n 
U 


9 
4 


71 


Ik 

10. 


Tr. ferri perchlondi . . 




2 9 


0 11 


0 4 


A 
If 


1 


42 


lb. 


Tr. amicae florum . * 




5 3 


1 6 


0 6 


U 


1 
1 


CI 
J 1 


IK 
lb. 


Tr. fern pomati 




— 


1 10 


0 6 


A 
U 


1 




IK 


Tr. amicffi radicis . . 


' ' 


9 0 


2 7 


0 9 


n 
U 


9 
4 


ft4 
0^ 


Ik 
lb. 


Tr. gallae . . . . 




— 


3 0 


0 10 


fl 

u 


9 


77 


IK 

ID. 






— 


2 5 


0 8 


n 
U 


9 




Ik 
lb. 


Ti'. gelsemii • • . • 




— 


2 0 


0 7 


n 

u 


1 




IK 

ID. 


Tr. aurantu . . . • 




— 


7 0 


2 0 


n 
u 


A 


47 


Ik 
lb. 


Tr. gentianae co. . • 




5 2 


1 5 


0 5 


fl 


1 




IK 

ID* 


Tr. aurantii dulcis . . 




— 


9 6 


2 5 


n 
U 


A 


7 


oz. 






— ■ 


— 


1 1 


fl 


9 


75 


lb. 






— 


— 


0 9 


n 
u 


9 


7 


OZ' 






— 


— 


1 1 


u 


9 




IK 

ID* 


i r. bellaaonnffi 




— 


2 3 


0 S 


A 

u 


9 
4 


01 


Ik 
lb. 


■-p 

1 r. guaiaci . . 




— 


2 10 


0 10 


A 
U 


9 
4 




IK 


i r. benzoini cotnp. 




7 4 


2 2 


0 7 


u 


1 
1 


ftl 
01 


Ik 
lb. 


Tr. guaiaci ammoniata . . 




— 


3 0 


0 10 


fl 
U 


9 
It 


SO 


IK 

ID. 


Tr. benzomi simp. • . 




— 


2 7 


0 8 


n 
u 


9 


19 
14 


OZ. 


Tr. guaranae 




— 


— 


1 9 


A 
U 


<3 


Oft 


IK 

ID. 


Tr. berberidis . . . ■ 




— 


3 2 


0 11 


n 
U 


9 




Ik 
lb. 


Tr. hamamelidis 




— 


1 9 


0 7 


fl 


1 
A 


Ti 
ij 


IK 

ID. 


Tr. boldo . . . . 






2 9 


0 9 


n 
U 


9 


QQ 

77 


Ik 
lb. 


Tr. hellebori nigri 




— 


3 7 


1 0 


fl 


9 

M 


(A 


IK 

ID. 






— 


2 5 


0 8 


n 
u 


9 


1 J 


oz. 






— 


— 


2 3 


fl 


A 


AO 


IK 

ID. 






— 


2 4 


0 8 


u 


9 
4 


on 

7U 


Ik 
lb. 


Tr. Hydrastis 


c 


— 


3 3 


0 10 


fl 
u 


9 

it 


7O 


IK 

ID. 






— 


3 4 


0 11 


u 


9 
4 


AA 
00 


Ik 
lb. 


Tr hyoscyami . . 


" c 


— 


2 4 


0 8 


A 
U 




17 
Jl 


IK 
10. 


Tr. calumbfe . . . . 




— 


2 0 


0 7 


n 

u 


1 
1 


Q 

7 


oz. 


Tr. ignatiae eimarse 


c 


— 


— 


1 4 


fl 

u 




4ft 
no 


IK 

ID. 


I r. campnorae co. . . 




— 


1 6 


0 5 


u 


1 
1 




Ik 
lb. 


Tr. iodi aetherea 




— 


7 0 


1 10 


fl 

II 


A 


^7 


OZ. 


Tr. cannabis ind. . . 


D T! 
t>t t 


— 


— 


4 8 


n 

U 


Q 
0 


7'^ 


Ik 
lb. 


Tr. iodi decolorata 




— 


2 8 


0 9 


n 
u 


9 


04 


IK 
ID. 


Tr. cantharidini . • 


\r 


— 


3 0 


0 10 




9 
4 


OA 
7O 


Ik 
lb. 


Tr. iodi decolorat. fort. B.P.C. 


— 


3 5 


0 11 


fl 

II 


9 


07 


IK 
ID. 


Tr ^..n^k^.^^:.. P R 'Oft 
I r. cantnanais r .D. 70 




— 


3 3 


0 11 


U 


9 
4 




Ik 
lb. 


Tr. ipecacuanhas 




— 


1 1 


0 4 






107 


IK 
ID. 


Tr. cantharidis acet. • . 




— 


3 7 


1 0 


u 


9 
4 


0 


oz. 


Tr. ipecacuanhas et opii 


B. F 


— 


■ — 


1 2 


u 


9 


<\7 


ID. 






— 


1 9 


0 7 


U 


-t 
1 


43 


oz. 






— 


— 


3 8 


fl 

II 


7 


OA 


IK 
ID. 


1 r. capsici lortior o.r.\^. 


• • 


— 


3 4 


1 0 


u 


9 
4 


J'i 


Ik 
lb. 


Tr. jaborandi 


C 


— 


2 0 


0 7 


fl 

II 


1 
1 


04 

tw 


Ik 
10. 






— 


3 0 


0 10 


n 
U 


9 


7ft 
/O 


Ik 
lb. 






' — 


2 7 


0 9 


n 

V 


9 
at 


40 


ID. 


T J 

1 r. cardamomi co. . . 




— 


1 9 


0 6 


n 
u 


1 
i 


7ft 
/O 


Ik 
lb. 






— 


2 7 


0 9 


0 


2 


inft 

lUo 


IK 
ID. 






— 


4 0 


1 1 


A 

u 


9 
4 


AA 
00 


Ik 
lb. 


Tr. kino 




— 


2 4 


0 8 


0 
u 


A 


00 


IK 

ID. 


T" 




— 


3 0 


0 11 


A 

u 


9 
4 


AA 
00 


Ik 
lb. 






— 


2 4 


0 8 


fl 




QA 
W 


lb. 






— 


3 2 


0 11 


A 

u 


0 
4 


AA 
OU 


Ik 
lb. 






— 


2 2 


0 8 


n 
II 


9 


10 


oz. 






— 


— 


2 4 


U 


A 
4 


in 

lU 


oz. 






— ' 


— 


1 6 


n 

u 


•1 


4Z 


lb. 


Tr. catechu 




— 


1 6 


0 6 


A 

U 


1 

1 


Q7 

0/ 


11 

lb. 


Tr. lavandulas co. 




— 


3 2 


0 11 


0 
u 


9 

M 


QA 

oU 


lb. 






— 


2 10 


0 9 


A 

u 


4 




Ik 
lb. 






— 


7 3 


2 2 


fl 
II 


A 
V 


1 1 
1 1 


oz. 


1 r. cerei iS.r.O. . . 




— 


— 


1 8 


U 


i 


A9 
OZ 


Ik 
lb. 


Tr. lobelias 


C 


— 


2 2 


0 7 


0 


1 


oU 


Ik 
lb. 






— 


2 2 


0 7 


A 

u 


1 


04 


Ik 
lb. 


Tr. lobelias aetherea 


C 


— 


3 0 


0 10 


A 
II 


9 
£t 


00 


Ik 
lb. 


1 r. cnlororormi comp. . . 




— 


2 6 


0 9 


n 


9 
4 


AA 
00 


Ik 
lb. 






— 


2 4 


0 9 


n 

u 


9 
tt 


io 


Ik 
lb. 


Tr -kl - ....k R D 

1 r. cnlor. at morpn. d.r.v^. 


B 


— 


1 6 


0 6 


A 
U 


1 


1 A 


oz. 


Tr. lycopodii 




— 


— 


2 0 


n 
II 


A 
% 




Ik 
lb. 


Tr. chlorof . et morph. -co. 




— 


— 


1 8 


A 
U 


i 


7 


oz. 






— 


— 


1 1 


fl 


9 

it 


5/ 


Ik 
lb. 


* •£ 




— 


2 0 


0 7 


A 

0 


* 

1 


Q7 


11 

lb. 






— 


3 1 


0 11 


n 
u 


9 

it 


OV 


Ik 
lb. 


T, „: i.„r.^ 




— 


2 5 


0 8 


U 


9 
4 


AO 
07 


Ik 
lb. 


Tr. myrrhas co. vet. 




8 6 


2 5 


0 9 






69 


Ik 
lb. 


1 r. cincnonae co. 




— 


2 5 


0 8 


n 
u 


9 
4 


QA 


11 

lb. 


Tr. myrrhas et boracis P.L.F. . . 


11 3 


3 0 


0 11 


0 


9 
m 


Li 


oz. 


■T' • : 




— 


— 


3 5 


A 

0 


0 


lAA 


Ik 
lb. 


Tr. myrrhoe et boracis B.P.C. . . 


— 


3 9 


1 0 


n 
II 


9 
A 


w 


Ik 
lb. 


Tr. cinnamomi co. 




— 


2 5 


0 9 


A 
U 


9 
4 


9 A 9 
404 


lu 
lb. 


Tr myrrhas et boracis c. eau de 












OA 

o4 


lb. 


1 r. cocae 


B, F 


— 


3 0 


0 10 


0 


0 
2 






Cologne P.L.F. 




— 


8 6 


2 3 






ID 


oz. 


1 r. cocci 




— 


— 


2 3 


A 


4 




Ik 
lb. 


Tr. nucis vomicas 


C 


— 


1 8 


0 6 


n 


1 
1 


60 


lb. 


Tr ^ 1 k*«' 

1 r. colchici 


C 


— 


2 0 


0 7 


A 
U 


1 


lOJ 


IL 

lb. 


Tr. odontalg. P.L.F. . . 


C 


— 


— 


1 8 


0 


4 


60 


lb. 


1 r. colchici sem. b.r. yo 




— 


2 2 


0 7 


0 


1 




lb. 


Tr. opii 


B. F 


— 


2 7 


0 9 


fl 
II 


9 

it 


QA 

o4 


lb. 


T* It*' * 

1 r. colchici cormi 


L 


— 


3 0 


0 10 




9 
4 


AO 
O7 


Ik 
lb. 


Tr. opii B.P. '98 


B. F 


— 


2 5 


0 8 


0 


2 


0.1 

84 


11 

lb. 


Tr ir • J 
1 r. coUinsoniae canad. . . 




— 


3 0 


0 10 


0 


2 


79 


lb. 


Tr. opii ammoniata 


C 


— 


2 7 


0 9 


fl 
II 


9 




oz. 


Tr. colocyntHidis . . 




— 


— 


1 6 


0 


3 


34 


Ik 
lb. 


Tr. opii aq. (1% morph.) 


B. F 


— 


2 0 


0 7 


0 


1 


90 


lb. 


Tr. condurango . . 




— 


3 1 


0 11 


0 


2 


I QA 

loU 


IL 

lb. 


Tr. opii crocata B.P.C. 


B. F 


— 


6 5 


1 10 


0 


4 


8 


oz. 


Tr. conii 


C 


— 


— 


1 2 


0 


2 


90 


lb. 


Tr. opii deod. U.S.P. . . 


B, F 


— 


3 2 


0 10 


0 


2 


7 


oz. 


Tr. convallariae . . 








1 1 


0 


2 


36 


lb. 


Ti. persionis B.P.C. 






1 A 


n c 


0 


1 


120 


lb. 


Tr. coto . . 






4 3 


1 2 


0 


2 


13 


oz. 


Tr. phosphori co. 








2 0 


0 


4 


13 


oz. 


Tr. croci 








1 10 


0 


4 


104 


lb. 


Tr. podophylli . . 






3 9 


1 1 


0 


; 


9 


oz. 










1 4 


0 


3 


84 


lb. 


Tr. podophylli ammoniata 






3 0 


0 10 


0 


2 


26 


oz. 


Tr. curcumas 








3 9 


0 


7 ' 


57 


lb. 


Tr. pruni virginianffi 






2 0 


0 7 


0 


1 


86 


lb 








3 0 


0 10 


0 


2 


78 


lb. 








2 9 


0 10 


0 


2 


81 


lb 


Tr. damianae 






2 le 


0 11 


0 


2 


84 


lb. 


Tr. pyrethri 






2 10 


0 11 


0 


2 


10 


1 02. 


Tr. daturae sem. 


C 






1 6 


0 


3 


86 


lb. 


Tr. pyrethri florum 






3 0 


0 10 


0 


2 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



25 



Celt 



lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
oz. 
lb. 
Ik- 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
oz. 

lb. 
lb. 
lb 
lb. 
lb. 

oz. 

lb. 
lb. 



lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

oz. 

lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

oz. 
30 
oz. 

lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

dr. 



lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
15 



lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
oz. 
oz. 

lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 



Ti— Un 

Tincturte — (cont). 



Tr. quassise 
Tr. quiilaiae 
Tr. quminee 
Tr. quininae ammoniata 
Tr. quin. am., pkd. (std. bot.). 
Tr. quin. ammon. c. cinnam. 
Tr. rhei co. 
Tr. rhei '85 
Tr. rhus toxicod. 
Tr. scillae 
Tr. senegee 
Tr. sennas CO. Alex. 
Tr. senna co. Tinnev. . . 
Tr. serpentanae . . 
Tr. stramonii 
Tr. stramonii sem. . . 
Tr. strophanthi . . 
Tr. sumbul 
Tr. tolutana 
Tr. Valerianae 
Tr. Valerianae aetherea . . 
Tr. Valerianae anunoniata 
Tr. veratn 
Tr. vibumi prunifol. 
Tr. zingiberis 

Tr. zingiberis fort. P.B. '85 
Tr. zingiberis fort., pkd. 

Toilet vinegar P.L.F. . . 
Toncae fabae Para frosted 
Tonca fabae Angostura . . 
Totaquina ' . . 
Tragacantha 
Tragacanthee pulv. opt. 
Tragacanthae pulv. sec. . . 
Triferrin 

Triferrin tablets gr. 5 . . 
Tnnitrophenol . . 
Trinitrophenol I% sol... 
Trinitrophenol ale. sol. 
Tripoli photographic . . 
Tripoli, polishing 
Trypsin . . 
Tumenol zunmon. 



u 

Ulmi fulvae cortex 
Ulmi fulvae corticis pulv. 
Ultramarine 
Unden pellets . . 



Unguenta 

Unguentum acidi benzoid c 

Ung. acidi borid 

Ung. acidi borid flavum 

Ung. acidi carbolid co. . . 

Ung. acidi salicylid 

Ung. ac, tannic . . 

Ung. aconitinae , . 

Ung. adrenalin! . . 

Ung. althaeae 

Ung. anilin. vir. (1 : 1,000) 
Ung. anilin. coccin. 5% 
Ung. anilin. coccin. 8% 
Ung. antim. tart. 





SeUinar Pric* 


Cost 




16 oz. 


4oz. 


1 oz. 


t dr. 


a. 






: d. 


<. d. 


s. d. 


>. d. 


per 






1 S 

1 o 


n R 

U u 


n 1 

U 1 


78 


lb. 






1 it 
1 o 


n 6 

u V 


fl 1 


30 


lb. 








9 4 


fl ^ 


18 






D a 


9 n 


n 7 


fl 1 

U 1 


7 








9 i 


1 fi 


3 'J- 


48 


lb. 






9 q 


n in 

U lU 


fl 2 


28 


lb. 




0 0 


1 7 
1 # 


n R 


fl 1 


II 






11 n 


^ 9 


n 11 

U 11 


fl 2 


18 


lb. 








1 1 

1 1 


0 2 


18 


lb. 






1 11 
1 11 


fl 7 


0 1 


33 


lb. 






9 A 


fl fi 


fl 2 


57 


lb. 






9 n 


n 7 


fl 1 

U A 


57 


lb. 






1 7 
1 fl 


n 

u u 


fl 1 

U A 


24 


lb. 






9 q 


fl 9 

V 9 


0 2 


8 




c 




1 fi 

1 u 




0 1 

U A 


28 


lb. 


c 




9 ? 


fl R 


fl 2 


38 


lb. 


c 






1 fl 

1 u 


fl 2 


20 


lb. 




— 




1 1 


0 2 


26 


lb. 






% n 


D in 

V lU 


fl 2 


42 


OZ. 






2 9 


fl R 
u o 


0 2 


42 


lb. 






1 n 

w U 


0 10 


0 2 


54 


lb. 






2 1 

it 1 


fl fl 


n 2 


42 


IK 


c 






fl Ifl 


fl 2 


72 


lb 








1 1 


fl 2 


22 


lb. 






2 7 

mm 9 


0 9 


A 2 


16 


lb. 






^ n 

o u 


fl in 

U lu 


fl 2 


30 


IK 

ID. 




31J. 


1 Q 

1 9 


oj- 


1 0 
1 u 


60 


IK 










48 


IK 
lu. 






U 9 


1 in 

1 lu 




41 


IK 

lO. 






9 n 

^ u 


fl 7 


fl 1 

U A 


26 


IK 

ID. 






7 fl 


2 1 
^ 1 


ft 4 
u ^ 


69 


IK 










fl 9 


27 










fl in 

U lu 




42 


Ik 

ID. 






f% in 


1 11 
1 11 


fl 4 


24 


Ik 
ID. 








1 1 

1 1. 


n 2 




Ik 
ID. 




r~ 






1 fl 


40 


Ik 
ID. 




doz. 


I 0 






^ 1 


Ik 
ID. 








1 2 
1 «i 


fl 2 


3Q 


Ik 
ID. 




1 w 


U u 


fl 2 




20 


Ik 
ID, 




it U 


n in 


fl 1 

U w 




32 


Ik 
ID. 




f 8 
^ o 


n Q 

U 9 


n t 

u o 




18 


Ik 
ID. 




1 n 

1 u 


n i 


0 1 

U 1 




33 


Ik 
ID. 










2 2 


48 


Ik 
ID. 










fl 8 
u o 


20 


Ik 
ID. 












"to 


Ik 
ID. 












33 

J J 


Ik 
ID. 












24 


Ik 

ID. 












24 


Ik 
ID. 






1 ^ 


fl i 
u *■ 




51 


Ik 




o u 


n 11 

U 11 


n i 




30 


Ik 
ID. 






1 9 


fl ^ 




48 


Ik 
ID. 






u u 


tube 




32 


Ik 

ID. 














Ik 
ID. 














Ik 
ID. 












71 


Ik 
ID. 






1 i 

1 4 


n i; 




uu 


Ik 
ID. 




1 in 
1 111 


n 7 






JL 


Ik 
ID. 




1 R 
1 o 


n 7 


n 9 




A 
o 


OZ. 




7 R 


it £t 


u o 




9 


OZ. 




2 8 


0 10 


0 3 




15 


oz. 






1 9 


0 6 




15 


lb. 


B 








1 9 


16 


lb. 








2 3 


0 4 


19 


lb. 




3 6 


1 0 


0 4 




21 


lb. 






1 3 


0 5 




24 


lb. 






1 9 


0 6 


0 1 


22 


lb. 






3 0 


0 10 


0 2 


42 


lb. 


B 


7 10 


2 3 


0 8 




26 


lb. 



Un 

Unguenta — (cent.) 



C 



Ung. aquae rosae. . 
Ung. aquos 
Ung. atropinas . . 
Ung. belladonnee 
Ung. bismuthi oleat. B.P.C 
Ung. boracis 
Ung. cadmii iodidi 
Ung. calamin. N.H.I. . . 
Ung. calaminae . . 
Ung. camphorae B.P.C. 
Ung. cantharidini 
Ung. cantharidis 
Ung. capsici 
Ung. capsici Co. 
Ung. cetacei 
Ung. chaulmoograe 
Ung. chrom. (factory) . . 
Ung. chrysarobini 
Ung. cocainae 
Ung. conii 

Ung. creosoti 

Ung. cupri oleatit 

Ung. elemi 

Ung. eucalsrpti . . 
Ung. flav, dil. 1-4 

Ung. gallae 

Ung. gallae c. opio B, ex F 
Ung. glycer. et ichthamol "jelly" 
Ung. glycer. et zinc. " jelly " . . 
Ung. glycerini plumbi subacet.'98 
Ung. haemamol (D.F.) . . 
Ung. hamamelidis 

Ung. hydrargyri 

Ung. hyd. ammoniat! . . C 
Ung. hyd. ammoniati dilutum C 
Ung. hyd. co. . . 
Ung. hyd. iodidi rubri . . C 
Ung. hyd. nitratis 
Ung. hyd. nitratis dil. . . 
Ung. hyd. oleatis 
Ung. hyd. oxidi flavi . . C 
Ung. hyd. oxidi rubri . . C 
Ung. hyd. stibchloridi . . 
Ung. ichthamol . . 
Ung. ichthamol. co. B.P.C. 
Ung. iodi 

Ung. iodi denigrescens 
Ung. iodi denigresc. N.H.I. 
Ung. iodoform! . . 

Ung. lanae co 

Ung. menthoi 5% 
Ung. mercuriale (" Trooper 
Ung. metallorum B.P.C. 
Ung. methyl salicyl. fort. 
Ung. methyl salicyl. dil. 
Ung. methyl salicyl. co. fort. 
Ung. methyl scJicyl. co. dil. 
Ung. oleoresinae capsid 
Ung. oleoresinae capsid co. 
Ung. opii . . . . B, 
Ung. paraf. alb. 
Ung. paraf. flav. 
Ung. phenol. 
Ung. picis carb. 
Ung. picis carb. CO. 
Ung. picis liq. . . 
Ung. pini sedat. (D.F.) 
Une. plumbi acetatis 



Selling Price 



16 oz. 
d. 


4oz. 
1. d. 


I 

>. 


oz. 
d. 


1 dr. 
<. d. 




2 Ifl 

it lU 


n 

u 


9 




^ q 


1 2 

1 it 


n 

u 


A 
1 








2 


g 


fl 5 






1 


1 


0 2 


fi fl 

V u 


1 q 

1 o 


u 


g 


fl t 


1 fi 


1 0 

A U 


0 


4 








1 


8 


fl ^ 


2 1 


fl 8 


n 

u 


3 




2 1 


fl 8 


n 

V 


•\ 
<i 


fl 1 


1 9 

4 it 


1 "K 

1 w 


n 








2 0 


0 


7 






2 1 

£» A 


0 

u 


7 


0 1 

V A 




fl 11 

U 11 


n 

u 


4 


fl 1 






1 

A 


2 


fl 7 


3 fi 

tj V 


1 0 

A V 


0 


4 






1 5 

\ 1 V 


n 

u 


g 




2 fi 


n 9 

U 9 


n 

u 


3 




o o 


1 0 

1 u 


0 


4 


fl 1 

U A 






g 


4 


1 A 

A U 




1 fi 

A W 


0 


6 


fl 1 

V 1 




2 0 


n 

u 


7 




■i 3 


1 6 

A V 


n 

u 


g 






2 7 

M f 


n 


9 


A 2 


2 q 

A tj 


fl Ifl 

U lU 


n 

u 








fl 7 


0 
u 


2 






1 2 

1 A 


n 


4 






2 2 


n 


7 


0 1 

U 1 


fi fl 


1 9 

1 V 


n 


g 




>; 2 

9 it 


1 fi 

A V 


n 

u 


s 






1 0 

A U 


fl 

u 


4 






2 2 

St m 


n 


7 


n 1 


1 fi 


1 fl 
A U 


n 


4 




■l t 


1 6 

A U 


n 


g 




"i n 


n 11 

U 11 


n 


4 




9 q 

it 9 


fl in 

U lU 


n 


Q 
O 




<i n 


1 K 

1 u 


n 


t; 

V 




U 9 


1 in 

1 lU 


n 


7 






1 ^ 

1 u 


n 

u 








n Q 

U 9 


n 


Q 

w 




4 fl 


1 2 

1 A 


n 


4 




2 ^ 


n X 

u o 


n 


Q 

w 




A 2 

** £t 


1 *\ 

1 o 


n 

u 


C 
«7 






1 Q 

1 9 


n 
u 


u 


n 1 

u I 




fl 9 


n 

u 


3 






1 9 
1 


n 


R' 
u 


fl 1 

U 1 




1 «> 


n 


r. 


fl 1 

U 1 




1 fl 
1 u 


n 


4 

Ti 






1 n 

1 u 


n 


4 






7 n 


n 


7 


n 1 

V 1 


^ Q 


1 1 

1 1 


n 

u 


4 


n 1 

u I 




1 Q 

1 9 


n 
u 


c 
u 


n 1 

U 1 


4 fl 


1 7 

1 £t 


n 

u 


4 




% fl 


n 11 

U 11 


u 


4 






1 4 

1 4 


n 


o 


n 1 




n in 

U lU 


n 

V 


Q 

a 






7 7 


n 
u 


7 


n 1 




1 7 
1 £t 


n 


4 


n 1 

U I 






1 

1 


9 


n 9 

U it 






1 

1 


4 


n 1 






2 


3 


0 4 


1 10 


0 7 


0 


2 




2 0 


0 8 


0 


3 






0 9 


0 


3 




2 8 


0 10 


0 


3 




3 0 


0 11 


0 


4 




2 9 


0 10 


0 


3 






1 6 


0 


5 


0 1 


3 3 


0 11 


0 


4 





26 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST October 5, 1935 

SUPPLEMENT 



Coit 


Un— Ve 

Unguenta — (cont.) 


Selling Price 


Cost 


Vi 71 




SelliDS Price 


16 oz. 
«. d. 






z. 
J. 


1 dr. 
J. d. 


16 oz. 


4oz. 
I. d. 


i az. 
<. d. 


1 dr. 
u d. 


i. 


per 


4 oz. 
J. d. 


1 c 


d. 


per 




38 


lb. 


Ung. plumbi carb. 







1 6 


0 


5 









Vina 














60 


lb. 


Ung. plumbi iodidi 







2 2 


0 


8 


0 2 


42 


lb. 








1 (i 


0 


6 




48 


lb. 


Ung. plumbi oleatis 




6 0 


1 9 


0 


6 


0 1 


24 


lb. 


Vin. antimoniale 


C 




0 11 


0 


4 




24 


lb. 


Ung. plumbi subacetatis 




3 0 


0 11 


0 


3 




126 


gal. 


Vin. aurantii 




pm 


2 0 








42 


lb. 


Ung. potass, polysulph. 






1 6 


0 


6 





198 


gal. 


Vin. aurantii deUm. 




pint 


3 3 


0 


4 




36 


lb. 


Ung. potassze sulphurates 




4 6 


1 4 


0 


5 





54 


lb. 








2 0 


0 


7 


0 1 


66 


lb. 


Ung. potassii iodidi 






2 5 


0 


9 


0 2 


66 


lb. 


Vin, cocffi . . . . B, F 




2 5 


0 


9 


0 2 


20 


lb. 






2 6 


0 9 


0 


3 




27 


lb. 


Vin. colchici . . . • 






1 0 


0 


4 


n 1 


33 


lb. 


Ung. resinae co. B.P.C. 






1 3 


0 


4 


_ 


36 


lb. 


Vin* coIcHici scm* • ■ 






1 4 


0 


5 


n 1 


38 


lb. 


Ung. resorcini B.P.C. . . 




_ 


1 5 


0 


5 


0 1 


30 


lb. 


Vin fern 






1 1 


0 


4 




30 


lb. 


Ung. resorcini co. B.P.C. 







1 1 


0 


4 


0 1 


24 


lb. 


Vin. fern citratis . • 




3 0 


1 0 


0 


4 




60 


lb. 


Ung. resorcini et bismuthi 


CO. 












38 


lb. 


Vm. ipecacuanKsB 14 • • 


c 




1 5 


0 


5 








B.P.C 







2 2 


0 


8 


0 2 


84 


lb. 




r 




3 0 


0 10 


n 2 


72 


lb. 


Ung. rosae album B.P.C. 


.. 




2 7 


0 


9 




51 


lb. 








1 10 


0 


7 




24 


lb. 








0 11 


0 


4 


_ 


18 


lb. 






2 3 


0 8 


0 


3 




51, 


lb. 


Ung. sabins 


B 





2 0 


0 


7 


0 1 


66 


lb. 








2 4 


0 


8 




42 


lb. 


Ung. sambuci flor. 




5 3 


1 6 


0 


5 


0 1 




















30 


lb. 


Ung. sambuci viride 




3 9 


1 1 


0 


4 


0 1 






w 














17 


lb. 


Ung. simplex alb. 




2 1 


0 8 


0 


3 




4.5 


lb. 


" dLCIglcUSt LJIvU* • ■ 




2 lb. 


0 10 


41b. 


1 4 


14 


lb. 


Ung. simpl. flav. 






0 7 


0 


2 





8 


lb. 


w alci suiicner r • • 




1 4 










54 


lb. 


Ung. staphisagriee 


C 





2 0 


0 


7 


0 1 


31 


lb. 


Whitp niU P 1 P 




4 0 


1 1 


0 


4 




13 


lb. 


Ung. sulphuris . . 




1 8 


0 6 


0 


2 






















24 


lb. 


Ung. sulphuris co. 




3 0 


0 11 


0 


4 









Y 














28 


lb. 


Ung. sulphuris et resorcini 






1 2 


0 


4 


_ 


57 


oz. 


^croform • ■ • • 


* • 










1 5 


10 


oz. 


Ung. sulphuris hypochloritis 









1 


6 


0 3 


24 


lb. 








1 0 


0 


4 




60 


lb. 


Ung. sulphuris iodidi . . 







2 2 


0 


8 


0 2 






Y 














36 


lb. 


Ung. terebinthins 




4 6 


1 4 


0 


5 




4 


oz. 










0 


7 


0 1 


90 


lb. 


Ung. thymol 5% 






3 3 


0 11 


0 2 


5 




YoKimbin8£ KydrocKIor* 




per 


cr. 


0 10 




93 


lb. 


Ung. thymol co. B.P.C 







3 4 


1 


0 




11 


10 


YoHimbinc tal^lcts • • 


Q 


pel 


tube 


1 


6 




51 


lb. 


Ung. thymol comp. dilut. B.P.C. 





2 0 


0 


7 


, 


















10 


oz. 


Ung. veratrinee . . 


C 


_ 




1 


6 


0 3 






2 














16 


lb. 


Ung. zinci oxid. 




2 0 


0 7 


0 


2 




26 


lb. 








1 0 


0 


4 


0 1 


22 


lb. 


Ung. zinci c. ol. ricini . . 




2 9 


0 10 


0 


3 


_ 


15 


oz. 


2inci benzoas ver. , • • 


* " 






2 


3 


0 4 


20 


lb. 


Ung. zinci c. ac. borici 




2 6 


0 9 


0 


3 


_ 


11 


oz. 


2inci bromidum • • 


• • 






1 


8 


0 3 


36 


lb. 


Ung. zinci oleatis 




4 6 


1 4 


0 


5 


0 1 


24 


lb. 


^inci carbonas . . . . 






1 0 


0 


4 


0 1 


45 


lb. 


Ung. zinci stearat. B.P.G 






1 9 


0 


6 




32 


lb. 


Zmci chloridum (fused) 


Q 


4 0 


1 2 


0 


4 


0 1 




















11 


oz. 


Zinci chloridum (sticks) 


c 






1 


8 


0 3 


20 


lb. 


University cream P.L.F. 




2 6 


0 9 








14 


lb. 


Zinci chloridum coml. . • 


c 


1 9 


0 7 


0 


2 




102 


oz. 


UradalB.P.C .. 








14 10 


2 2 


33 


oz. 


Zinci et hydrarg. cyan. 


Q 






4 10 


0 9 


26 


oz. 











3 


9 


0 7 


24 


oz. 


Zinci lodidum . . . • 








3 


6 


0 6 


20 


oz. 












3 


0 


0 5 


12 


oz. 


Zinci lactas . . • ■ 








1 


9 


0 3 


24 


lb. 









0 11 


0 


4 


0 1 


48 


lb. 


Zmci oleas prsecip. . . 






1 9 


0 


6 


0 1 


24 


OZ. 


Ureae hydrochlor. 




_ 




3 


6 


0 6 


51 


lb. 


Zinci oleostearas . • 






1 10 


0 


7 


0 1 


13 


oz. 


Urethanum 


B 


_ 


_ 


2 


3 


0 4 


16 


lb. 


7* ' "J 

Z.inci oxiaum . • . • 




2 0 


0 7 


0 


2 




36 


oz. 


Urotropin 








5 


3 


0 11 


66 


lb. 


Zinci oxidum (Howards) 






2 5 


0 


9 




12 


lb. 








0 6 


0 


2 




19 


lb. 


Zinci oxidum (Hubbuck) 




2 5 


0 9 


0 


3 






















12 


lb. 


Zinci oxid. c. amylo . • 




1 6 


0 6 


0 


2 






















12 


lb. 


Z.inci oxid. c. amylo et ac. Dor 




1 6 


0 6 


0 


2 








V 














14 


oz. 


Z.inci permanganas • . 








2 


3 


0 4 


78 


b. 


Valerianas rhizoma Ang. 






2 10 


0 10 


0 2 


15 


oz. 


Zinci peroxidum 2,0^^^ . . 








2 


3 


0 5 


22 


lb. 


Valerianae rhizoma Belg. 






0 10 


0 


4 




42 


lb. 


Zinci phosphas . . 






1 6 


0 


5 


0 1 


103 


oz. 


Validol 












3 6 


15 


oz. 


Zinci phosphidum 








2 


3 


0 4 


103 


100 


Validol perles 




doz* 


1 6 








45 


lb. 


Zinci stearas 






1 8 


0 


7 


0 1 


27 


25 


Valyl perles gr. 2 






1 6 








12 


oz. 


Zinci sulphanilas 








1 


9 


0 3 


20 


oz. 


Vanillee fabae 








3 


0 


0 6 


9 


lb. 


Zinci sulphas 




1 2 


0 5 


0 


2 




26 


oz. 


Vanilhnum 








3 


9 


0 7 


6 


lb. 


Zinci sulphas coml. 




0 9 


0 3 


0 


1 




42 


lb. 


Vap. menthol N.I. F. 






1 6 


0 


6 




8 


oz. 


Zinci sulphidum pur. . . 








1 


1 


0 2 


189 


12 V. 


Ventriculin, P., D. & Co. 




12 


vials 


21 


0 




34 


lb. 


Zinci sulphocarb. pulv. 






1 3 


0 


5 


0 1 


122 


lOOgr 


Ventriculin with iron. P., D.&Co. 


100 


grs. 


12 


6 




16 


oz. 


Zinci tannas 








2 


4 


0 4 


98 


oz. 


Veramon 


C 










2 3 


16 


oz. 


Zinci valerianas pulv. . . 









2 


4 


0 4 


126 


100 


Veramon tablets gr. 6 . . 


C 


doz. 


2 0 








38 


lb. 


Zincum granulatum pur. 






1 4 


0 


5 




19 


lb. 


Veratri alb. rhiz. pulv. . . 






0 9 


0 


3 




13 


lb. 


Zincum granulatum coml. 




1 8 


0 7 


0 


2 




60 


lb. 


Veratri virid. rhiz. pulv. 






2 3 


0 


8 


0 2 


13 


lb. 


Zingiberis rhizoma Afric. 




1 8 


0 6 


0 


2 




20 


dr. 


Veratrina 


B 










3 0 


15 


lb. 


Zingib. rhiz. Afric. pulv. 




1 0 


0 6 


0 


2 




ib 


oz. 


Veronal . . 


B 










0 9 


14 


lb. 


Zingib. rhiz. Afric pulv. cr». 




1 9 


0 6 


0 


2 




22 


25 


Veronal tablets, gr. 5 . . 


B 


doz. 


1 6 








42 


lb. 


Zingib. rhiz. Jam. opt. . . 




5 3 


1 6 


0 


6 




36 


oz. 


Veronal, sodium 


B 










0 9 


36 


lb. 


Zingib. rhiz. Jam. pulv. opt. 




1 4 6 


1 4 


0 


5 


0 1 


22 


25 


Veronal sodium tabs 


B 


1 doz. 


1 6 








32 


oz. 


1 Zircon nit. 




\ 




4 


8 


e 8 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



27 



Ampullae 



Acetyl choline 0.05 . . 
Acetyl choline 0.1 

Adrenalin 

Apomorphinae hydroch. gr. -^o 
Atropinae sulph. gr. xso' 

Benzamin. hyd. gr. ^, adrenalin, gr. 
Bismuth. 0.2 gm. . . . . 
Bismuth, salicyl. 1 .2 c.c 



Caffein. sod.-sal. gr. 3. . 
Giffein. sodii benz. 3.75 
Camph. in ol. olivae gr. IJ, gr. 3 
Gimphor, ffither, ol. oliv, 

Qioline hyd. O.I c.c 

Cocain. hydroch. gr. i, gr. i, gr. i 
G>cain. hydroch. gr. i 

adrenalin, gr. o • • 
G>cain. hydroch. gr. i 

adrenalin, gr. g-g o • • 



B, F 



B. F 



B. F 



Digitalin. gr. ^ 

Emetinae hydroch. gr. J . . . . 
Emetin. hydroch. gr. 1 
Ephedrine sulph. gr. J 
Ergotoxin. ethanesulph. 0.5 mg. 
Ergotoxin. phosphate 0.5 mg. 
Ethyl chaulmoogratis 2 c.c. . . 

Ethyl morrhuatis 

Ethyl hydnocarpate with creosote, camph. 

olive oil E.C.C.O 

B 

.. B 

B 



B. 



Extract, ergotae gr. 1 J 
Extract, ergota: gr. 3^ 
Extract, ergotae gr. 7 . . 
Ext. pituitary liq. 0.5 . . 
Ext. pituitary liq. 1 .0 . . 

Ferri et ammon. cit. vir. gr. J 

Glucosi 2 fl. oz. for I pt. 
Gum saline cone. 50 c.c. 



Hyoscin. hydrobr. gr. . . . . 

Indigo carmine 0.4 per cent 

lodi, boxes o( 6 

Manganese butyrate 1 .5 cc 
Mercurial creeim n\ 10 
Morph. hydroch. gr. \, gr. i, gr. \, gr. i B, 
Morph. hydroch. gr. J 
atropin. sulph. gr. 

1. cinerei (grey oil) i c.c. 

Peptoni7i% 1.5 cc 

Pilocarpin. nit. gr. j; . . 
Pituitrin i cc. . . . . . . • 

Pituitrin 1 c.c 

inine urethane 2 c.c. 

copolamin. hydrobr. gr. 
morph. acet. gr. J . . 
dii cacodyl. gr. i, gr. f 
Sodii cacodyl. gr. \, ferri cacodyl. gr. i 
Strophanthin. gr. 5^00 
Strychnin, sulph. gr. 6^75, gr. 3^ 
Symmetrical ureas S.U.M. 36 (0.01 gm.) 
Symmetrical ureas S.U.P. 36 (0.01 gm.) 
Symmetrical ureas S.U.P. 468 (0.001 gm.) 

Tetraiodophthalein T.l.P. 3.5 gm. 28 c.c 
rhiosinamin.-sod. sal. 2.3 cc 



Cost 



per 
i doz. 
d. 



B, 



40 
48 
18 
18 
18 

18 

30 
26 

18 
18 
18 
26 
46 
18 

},s 

}" 

22 

30 
42 
22 
30 
30 
27 
24 

22 
18 
26 
40 
30 
48 

18 

16 

20 

18 

32 
10 

32 
20 
20 

1 20 

18 

30 
22 



Sell 



per 
4 doz. 
I. d. 



Cost 



} 



22 

18 

18 
22 
18 
18 
30 
30 
60 

22 
42 



5 0 

6 0 
2 3 
2 3 
2 3 

2 3 

3 9 
3 3 



2 3 



2 3 



2 9 



2 3 



per 
doz. 
d. 



2 3 



34 
34 
34 

34 
52 
46 

34 
34 
34 
48 

34 
34 

34 

30 

52 
78 
40 
52 
52 
56 
23 

40 
34 
48 
78 
56 
88 

34 

each 
34 
60 

60 
36 
38 

38 

34 

56 
40 



40 
34 

34 
40 
34 
34 
64 
64 



each 
76 



SeU 



per 
doz. 
J. d. 



4 3 

4 3 

4 3 

4 3 
6 6 

5 9 

4 3 

4 3 

4 3 

6 0 

4 3 

4 3 

4 3 

5 0 



4 3 



4 3 

7 6 

7 6 

4 6 

4 9 

4 9 



4 3 



Cost 



8 0 
8 0 



9 6 



270 
381 
468 
326 
180 
141 
174 
129 
153 

153 

153 

186 

276 
402 
192 
222 
357 
252 
252 
390 
132 
222 
303 
372 

396 

129 
141 
174 
384 
207 
306 
414 
483 
666 
156 
204 
309 
168 
192 
60 
336 
450 
486 
132 
162 
174 
246 
540 
228 
348 
270 
162 
258 
274 
321 
276 

360 
246 
348 
222 
300 



Capsulae vel Perles 



1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1.000 
1.000 
1.000 

1,000 
1.000 
1,000 

1,000 

1.000 

1.000 

1,000 
1.000 
1.000 
1.000 
1.000 
1. 000 
1,000 
1.000 
1. 000 
1. 000 
1.000 
1.000 

1.000 

1.000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1.000 
1,000 
1.000 
1.000 
1.000 
1.000 
1.000 
1,000 
1.000 
1.000 

100 
1.000 
1. 000 

500 
1.000 
1.000 
1.000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
l.COO 
1,000 
1.000 
1.000 
1.000 
1. 000 
1.000 

1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1.000 
1,000 



Caps, apiol. n\ 3 

Caps, apiol. H)^ 5 

Caps, apiol (3) et ext.ergot.(2) C 

Caps, apiol steel pulegii IH. 5 . . 

Caps, benzyl benz. HI. 3 

Caps. Blaudit gr. 10 

Caps. Blaudii gr. 1 5 

Caps. Blaudii pil. gr. 5 

Caps. Blaudii pil. (5) et hasmo- 

glob. (3) .. .. .. 

Caps. Blaudii pil. (5) ct ac 

arsenios (577) . . . . C 
Caps^ Blaudii pil. (5) et ac. 

arsenios. et strych. . . B 
Caps. Blaudii pil. (10) et ext. 

case sag. (I) 

Caps, carbon tetrachlor. I cc 
Caps, carbon tetrachlor. 2 cc. . 
Caps, case sag. ext. liq. IH. 20 . . 
Caps. case. sag. ext. liq. n\ 30. . 
Caps, case sag. ext. liq. H\ 60. . 

Caps, cinnam. et quin 

Caps, colchicin. salicyl. gr. -aTcjC 
Caps, colchicin. salicyl. gr. C 
Caps, copaibae (Maran.) HJ^ 5 . . 
Caps. copaibcE (Maran.) 10. . 
Caps, copaibee (Maran.) Tlj^ 15. . 
Caps, copaibae et cubeba; et 

buchulll 10 

Caps, copaiba: et cubebie et ol. 

santiJi HI 10 

Caps, creosoti in oleo TT^ I C 
Caps, creosoti in oleo TH. 2 C 
Caps, creosoti in oleo IH^ 3 C 
Caps, ergotffi ext. gr. 3 . , B 
Caps, filicis maris IT^^ 5 . . 
Caps, filicis nnaris HI. 10 
Caps, filicis maris TTl^ 15 
Caps, filicis maris TT\^ 20 
Caps, filicis maris IR^ 30 
Caps, guaiacol. in oleo I 
Caps, guaiacol. in oleo 2 
Caps, guaiacol. in oleo Tl]^ 5 
Caps, haemoglobin, gr. 3 
Caps, haemoglobin, gr. 5 
Caps. Halibut Oil HI 3 
Caps, lecithin, gr. 2i . . 
Caps.leclthin.(li)et.paraf.liq.(30) 
Caps, menthol valer. 11)^ 5 
Caps. ol. cajuputi Tl\ I . . 
Caps. ol. caryophylli n\ 2 
Caps, ol chaulmoogra 5 
Caps. ol. chaulmoogra Tl\ 10 . . 
Caps. ol. chenopodii ITt 5 
Caps. ol. cinnamomi III. I 
Caps. ol. cinnamoipi 2 
Caps. ol. methylene Blue gr. 2 . . 
Caps. ol. morrhuse 10 
Caps. ol. morrhuffi IH. 1 5 
Caps. ol. morrhuffi 20 
Caps. ol. morrhus H\ 30 
Caps. ol. morrhuffi (20) et creosot. 

(1) C 

Caps. ol. morrh. (30) et creos. (2)C 
Caps. ol. olivas n\ 15 . . 
Caps. ol. olivec 30 . . 
Caps. ol. ricini I^^ 1 5 . • 
Caps. ol. ricini n\ 30 , . 



Selling Price 



36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 

36 

36 

36 

36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 

36 

36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 

36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 

36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 



1 3 



1 3 



1 3 



1 10 

2 1 



2 6 



2 4 
2 11 
5 7 



1 10 



24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 

24 

24 

24 

24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 

24 

24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
25 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 

24 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 



1 4 

1 9 

2 0 
1 6 
1 1 
1 0 
1 1 

0 11 

1 0 

1 fi 

1 0 

1 1 
1 I 
1 11 
1 1 

1 2 

1 8 

1 3 

1 6 

2 « 

0 11 

1 2 
1 6 

1 9 

1 9 
0 11 

0 11 

1 1 
1 9 
1 2 
1 6 

1 9 

2 3 
2 18 
1 0 



2 
6 
0 
2 
8 
7 
0 
8 

0 11 

1 1 
1 1 
1 1 

4 
3 
8 
6 
1 
5 
8 
8 

4 
8 
3 
8 
2 
5 



28 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



October 5, 1935 



Cost 


(cont.) 


Selling Price 


i 


per 




I. 


i. 




J. i. 


3% 


1. 000 


Caps. ol. ricini TI\ 60 . , 


36 


2 


8 


24 


1 10 


264 


500 


Caps. ol. santali 5 . . 


36 


3 


3 


24 


2 3 


345 


500 


1 .1* TTl 1 

<_aps. ol. santali I'l, /j .. 


36 


4 


1 


24 


2 10 


492 


500 


1 .1" TTl 1 A 

v^ps. ol. santali Ml^ lu . . 


36 


5 


9 


24 


3 9 


456 


1.000 


Caps. ol. santali (5) c. copaiba (J) 


36 


2 11 


24 


2 0 


129 


1,000 


I'.I* , TTl C 

Caps. ol. terebinthmee rect. "l. D 


36 


I 


o 

i 


24 


0 11 


168 


1,000 


/— • 1 , I'.I. . TYl 1 rt 

tJaps. ol. terebinthmee rect. \\ lU 


36 


1 


5 


24 


1 1 


150 


1,000 


* 1 .1 1 TTl O 

Caps, pencnthol. \\i .. 


36 


1 


3 


24 


1 0 


180 


1. 000 


Caps, perichthol. n\. 5 . . 


36 


1 


6 


24 


1 1 


143 


1.000 


Caps, picis m 5 


36 


1 


6 


24 


0 11 


228 


1.000 


Caps, syrup Lastoni \\ 30 B 


36 


1 


9 


24 


1 2 


321 


1.000 


Caps, syrup Eastoni 3i> ^ 


36 


2 


3 


24 


1 6 


228 


1.000 


Caps, syrup, glyceroph. co. »\yj C 


36 


1 


9 


24 


1 2 


324 


1,000 


Caps, syrup, glyceroph. co. "h'^-C 


36 


2 


3 


24 


1 7 


228 


1,000 


Caps, syrup, hypophosphitum 
















CO. HI 30 .. .. C 


36 


1 


9 


24 • 


1 2 


324 


1,000 


Caps, syrup, hypophospliituni 
















CO. 3i- •• ■• c 


36 


2 


3 


24 


1 7 


147 


1,000 


Caps, terebsni . . 


36 


1 


6 


24 


1 4 


222 


1,000 


" Caps, tinct. quinines am. TI}^ 30 


36 


1 


9 


24 


1 2 


321 


1.000 


Caps, tinct. quininae am. 5i- • • 


36 


2 


3 


24 


1 8 



Cost 



63 


1,000 


63 


1,000 


51 


1,000 


63 


1,000 


63 


1,000 


72 


1,000 


78 


1,000 


75 


1,000 


87 


1.000 


75 


1.000 


75 


1.000 


69 


1 000 


246 


1,000 


63 


1,000 


63 


1,000 


48 


1,000 


105 


1.000 


108 


1,000 


87 


1.000 


120 


1,000 


111 


1.000 


108 


1,000 


171 


1,000 


273 


1,000 


312 


1,000 


186 


1,000 


87 


1.000 


111 


1.000 


87 


1.000 


69 


1,000 


162 


1,000 


99 


1,000 


99 


1. 000 


99 


1.000 


III 


1.000 


150 


1000 


135 


1.000 



Tabcllse 



Acidi arseniosi gr. 0750 • • • • ^ 
Acidi arseniosi gr. x5 • • • • ^ 
Acetanilidi gr. 3 . . 

Acetanilidi gr. 5 
Acetanilidi co. . . 

Acetanilidi (3) caffein. (i) ammon. 

carb. (1) 

Acetanilidi (3) caffein. (i) sod. Lie. (1) 

Aloes et ferri gr. 4 

Aloes et myrrhae 

Aloini gr. J 

Aloini gr. i 

Aloini CO. . . . . . . S 

Amidopyrinee gr. 5 

Ammonii bromidi gr. 5 • . . 

Antacid (Roberts) 

Aspirin gr. 5 

Aspirin gr. 10 

Aspirin (4) et caffein. (1) 
Aspirin (2i) et phenac (2i) . . 
Aspirin (2^) et phenac. (2i) et caffein.(l) 
Aspirin compound N.I.F. . . B, F 
Aspirin (3) et pulv. ipec. co. (2) B, f 
Aspirin (4) et quininae sulphatis (I) . . 

Barbitoni gr. 5 B 

Barbitoni solubile gr. 5 
Benzonaphthol gr. 5 

Beta-naphthol gr. 3 

Beta-naphthol. gr. 5 
Beta-naphthol co. ' . . 

Bismuthated magnesia , 

Bismuthi carbonatis gr. 5 

Bismuthi carb. (2i) et sod. bic. (2i) . . 

Bism. carb. (2) sod. bic. (2) p. 

zingib. (1) 

Bismuthi carb. (2) sod. bic. (li) p. 

zingib. (i) p. rhei (1) 
Bismuthi carb. (2) pepsin. (1) carb. 

lig.(2) .. 

Bismuthi salicylatis gr. 5 
Bismuthi subnitratis gr. 5 



Selling Price 
(in containers) 



100 


50 


25 


5. i. 


i. 


i. 


.. i. 


1 6 


1 


\ 


0 9 


1 6 


1 




0 9 


1 3 


0 


10 


0 7 


1 5 


1 




0 9 


1 5 


0 


11 


0 7 


1 6 


1 




Q 9 


1 6 


1 




0 9 


1 9 


1 




0 9 


1 11 


1 




0 9 


1 9 


1 




0 9 


1 9 


1 




0 9 


1 9 


1 




0 9 


4 1 


2 




1 3 


1 5 


1 




0 7 


1 6 


1 




0 9 


1 2 


0 


11 


0 7 


2 0 


1 




0 11 


2 0 


1 


3 


0 10 


1 9 


1 


1 


0 9 


2 4 


1 


6 


0 11 


2 2 


1 


3 


0 10 


2 0 


1 


3 


0 9 


3 0 


1 


9 


1 1 


4 5 


2 


5 


1 6 


5 0 


2 


9 


1 7 


3 3 


1 


10 


1 2 


1 11 


1 


2 


0 9 


2 3 


1 


4 


0 11 


1 11 


1 


2 


0 9 




1 


1 




2 0 


1 


8 


1 1 


2 0 


1 


2 


0 9 


2 0 


1 


2 


0 9 


2 0 


1 


2 


0 9 


2 3 


1 


4 


0 10 


2 10 


1 


7 


1 0 


2 6 


1 


6 


0 11 



Cost 



51 
. 51 
63 

?I 
51 
84 
99 
102 
45 
51 
38 
39 
75 
111 
39 
51 
273 
120 
264 
222 
200 
210 
173 
151 
225 
225 
69 
75 
216 
162 
180 
126 
% 
60 
75 
117 
186 
285 
384 
270 
69 
72 
57 
57 
96 
108 
126 
75 
96 
75 
194 
90 
57 
33 
33 
48 
126 
36 
45 
60 
60 
6n 
60 
39 
51 
93 



1.000 
1,000 
1.000; 

1.000 
1,000 
1.000 
1.000 
500 
1.000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1.000 
1.000 
1. 000 
1.000 
500 
250 
1.1 
500 
250 
500 
500 
1.000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1.000 
1,000 
1.000 
25 
1,000 
1.000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1.000 
1.000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1.000 
1.000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1.000 
1.000 
1.000 
1 .000 
1.000 
1 000 
1.000 
1.000 



TabGlIae 

(cont.) 



Selling Price 
(in containers) 



100 

>. i. 



Blaud pil. gr. 5 

Biaud pil. (5) et ac. arsenios. (t5o) C 
Blaud pil. (5) ac. arsenios. (j^o) strych- 
ninae(Tso) •• .. .. B 
Blaud pil. (5) aloin. (2V) 
Blaud pil. (5) et case. sag. (i) . . 
Blaud pil.mang.diox.(l)ac.arsen.(6V) C 

Caffeinae citratis gr. 2 

Calcii acetylsalicylatis 

Calcii lactatis gr. 5 
Calcii sulphid. ad gr. 1 
Carbonis lig. (salicis) gr. 5 
Cascaras sag. ext. gr. 2 . . 

Cascarae sag. ext. gr. 3 

Cascarae sag. ext. gr. 5 . . 
Cerevisiae ferm. gr. 2 . . 
Cerevisiae ferm. gr. 5 . . 
Cinchophenum gr. 5 
Cinnam. et quin. 

Codeinae gr. J . . . . . . B 

Codeinae gr. ^ . . . . . . B 

Codeinae gr. 1 . . . . . . B 

Codeinae phosphatis gr. J . . B 
Codeinae phosphatis gr. i . . B 
Codeinae phosphatis gr. 1 . . B 
Cotarnin. hydrochl. gr. | . . B 
Cotarnin. pthal. gr. | . . . . B 

Cretee arom. pulv. gr. 5 

Cretas arom. cop. gr. 5 B. ex f 

Diamorph. hyd, gr. 1^ . . . . B. f 

Diamorph. hyd. gr. • • • • ^. f 

Digitalin. amorph. t5o • • • • ^ 

Digitalis fol. gr. 1 

Doveri pulv. gr. 5 . . B, ex F 
Emetin. bism. iod. gr. 1 . . C 
Ephedrinae hydrochloridi gr. i 
Ephedrinae hydrochloridi gr. i 
Ergotae ext. gr. 1 . . . . B 
Ergotae ext. gr. 2 . . . . B 
Ergotae ext. gr. 3 . . . . B 
Ferri alginatis gr. 5 

Ferri redact, gr. 3 

Ferri carb. sacch. gr. 5 
Formaldeh. B.P.C. gr. 15 
Formald. et cinnam. gr. 12 
Fuci ext. gr. 4 . . 
Fuci ext. gr. 5 . . 
Galvani pil. co. gr. 4 . . 
Glycyrrh. pulv. co. gr. 30 
Guaiaci resinae gr. 5 
Guaiaci resina: (3) sulph. (3) . . 
Guciiacol. carbonatis gr. 5 
Haemoglobin, co. . . - . . 
Hexaminae gr. 5 
Hydrargyri c. creta gr. i 
Hydrargyri c. creta gr. 1 
Hydrargyri c. creta gr. 2 . . 
Hydrargyri c. creta (!) et p. ipec. co.(l)B 
Hydrargyri c. creta (i) sod. bic. (i) . . 
Hydrargyri c. creta (1) sod. bic. (3) . . 
Hydrargyri iodidi rub. gr. . . 
Hydrargyri iodjdi rub. gr. • • ^ 
Hydrrrgyii iodidi vir. gr. i . . C 
Hydrargyri iodidi vir. gr. i . . C 
Hydrargyri subchloridi gr. i . . 
Hydrargyri subchloridi gr. 1 . . 
Hydrargyri subchloridi gr. 3 . . 



1 4 
1 6 



1 8 

1 9 
3 8 

2 11 

3 3 
2 8 
2 0 



1 11 

2 0 

2 8 

1 11 
1 8 

3 1 
1 11 
1 4 



50 



0 11 

1 1 

1 1 
1 1 

0 11 

1 1 

1 3 

2 0 
0 10 
0 11 
0 10 

0 9 

1 1 

1 4 
0 10 
0 11 

2 4 



1 2 



1 10 

2 8 

3 4 
1 11 
1 1 



(40)10 
1 2 
1 1 
1 9 
1 2 
0 11 
0 9 
0 9 

0 10 

1 2 
0 9 

0 10 

1 1 
1 1 
1 1 
1 1 
0 10 

0 10 

1 0 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



29 



Cott 



1,000 
1,000 
1.000 
1.000 
1000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
500 
1,000 
1.000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1.000 
1.000 
1,000 
1.000 
1,000 
1,000 
1. 000 
1.000 
1.000 
1.000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
500 
500 
500 
1,000 
1.000 
1,000 
500 
500 
1. 000 
500 
1,000 
1. 000 
1. 000 
1. 000 
1.000 
1.000 
1.000 
100 
100 
250 
1.000 
1.000 
1.000 
1,000 
1,000 
500 
1.000 
1.000 
1.000 
i.OOO 
1.000 
1.000 
100 
500 
1.000 
1.000 
100 



Tabellae 

(cont.) 



Hydrargyri subchloridi gr. 5 . . 
Hyoscinee hydrobr. gr. X57J • ■ ^ 
Hyoscinae hydrobr. gr. . . B 

Iodised throat 

Lactic, bacilli 

Lithii carbonatis gr. 5 . . 
Lithii citratis gr. 5 
Lithii citratis eff. gr. 5 in gr. 15 
Methylsulphonal gr. 5 . . 
Nitroglycerini gr. rscJ. li o. jls 
Ox bile (purif .) gr. 5 . . 
Pepsini gr. 2i (coated) . . 
Phenacetini gr. 5 
Phenacetini, quin., cailein. 
Phenacetini (4) et caff. cit. (1) 

Phenazoni gr. 5 

Phenazoni (4) et caH. cit. (I) . . 
Phenolphthaleini gr. 1 . . 
Phenolphthaleini gr. 2 . . 
Phenolphthaleini gr. 5 . . 
Potassii bicarbonatis gr. 5 
Potassii bromidi gr. 5 . . 
Potassii chloratis gr. 5 . . 
Potassii chloratis et boracis gr. 5 
Potassii chior.etbor.etcocain.(gr.f ^7j)C 
Quininae ammon. TI\ 30 

Quininae ammon. 3i 

Quininae ammon. et cinnam. 3i- 
Quininae bisul. gr. 1 
Quininae bisul. gr. 2 
Quininae bisul. gr. 3 
Quininae bisul. gr. 5 
Quininae ethyl carb. gr. 5 
Quininae hydrobrom. gr. 1 
Quininae hydrobrom. gr. 2 
Quininae hydroch. gr. 2 
Quininae hydroch. gr. 3 
Quininae hydroch. gr. 5 
Quininae salicyl. gr. 2 . . 
Quininae salicyl. gr. 5 . . 
Rhei (3) et sod. bic. (2) 
Rhei (3) zingib. (i) sod. bJcdi) 
Rhei pil. CO. gr. 4 
Rhei pulv. CO. gr. 5 
Saccharini 550 gr. 0.3 (500—200—100) 

Salicini gr. 5 

Salol. gr. 5 

Santonini gr. 1 . . 

Santonini co. B.P.C 

Santonini (i) et hyd. subchl. (i) 
Soda-mint gr. 5 .... 
Sodii bicarbonatis gr. 5 
Sodii citratis gr. 2 
Sodii citratis gr. 5 
Sodii phosph. ac. (5) hexamin. (5) 

Sulphonal gr. 5 C 

Sulph. praecip. (5) et pot. bitart. (1) . . 
Syr. Eastoni ni30 .. ;. B 
Syr. Eastoni 3 j- • • . . iB 

Syr. glyceroph. co. TH^30 . . C 

Syr. hypoph. co. 3j C 

Theobrom. et sod. sal. gr. 5 .-. 
Theophyllin-sod. acet. gr. 4 . . 

' Three bromides " 

" Three syrups " . . . . C 
" Three valerianates " . . 
Trypsogen 



Selling Price 

(in containers) 



100 


50 


25 


s. d. 


1. 


d. 


«. d. 


2 6 


1 


6 


1 0 


3 3 


1 


9 


1 1 


2 8 


1 


7 


0 11 




1 


1 


— 


4 10 


2 10 


1 8 


2 10 


1 


8 


1 1 


2 10 


1 


8 


1 1 


4 1 


2 10 


1 4 


5 7 


3 


1 


1 9 


1 6 


1 


1 


0 9 


4 1 


2 


3 


1 3 


2 6 


1 


6 


0 11 


1 8 


1 


1 


0 9 


2 10 


1 


8 


1 1 


1 8 


1 


2 


0 9 


3 1 


1 


9 


1 1 


2 9 


1 


7 


1 0 


1 4 


0 11 


0 7 


1 4 


1 


0 


0 8 


1 6 


1 


2 


0 9 


1 3 


1 


0 


0 7 


1 3 


1 


0 


0 8 


0 9 


0 


7 , 


0 6 


0 11 


0 


8 


0 6 


2 0 


1 


3 


0 10 


1 10 


1 


1 


0 9 


2 6 


1 


6 


1 0 


2 11 


1 


8 


1 1 


2 3 


1 


4 


0 11 


3 8 


2 


1 


1 3 


5 0 


2 


9 


1 7 


7 4 


4 


0 


2 3 


9 6 


5 


3 


2 10 


2 6 


1 


6 


1 0 


4 3 


2 


4 


1 5 


4 3 


2 


4 


1 5 


5 9 


3 


1 


1 9 


8 9 


4 


7 


2 6 


4 7 


2 


6 


1 6 


8 2 


4 


3 


2 6 


1 11 


1 


2 


0 9 


1 9 


1 


2 


0 10 


1 9 


1 


1 


0 9 


1 6 


0 11 


0 7 


3 3 


1 


7 


1 0 


4 5 


2 


6 


1 5 


2 4 


1 


4 


0 11 









3 6 









3 6 









2 0 


0 9 


0 


7 


0 6 


0 9 


0 


7 


0 6 


1 1 


0 


9 


0 7 


1 6 


1 


1 


0 9 


2 0 


1 


3 


0 10 


5 0 


2 


8 


1 6 


1 5 


1 


0 


0 8 


1 6 


1 


0 


0 8 


2 3 


1 


4 


0 10 


2 11 


1 


9 


1 1 


2 3 


1 


4 


0 11 


3 5 


1 11 


1 2 




8 


4 


4 3 


2 3 


1 


4 


0 10 


2 8 


1 


7 


1 0 


5 0 


2 


8 


1 6 


per 


doz. 


1 4 



Cost 


Tabellae, Hypodermic 


Sell 












d. 


per 


(Tubes of ten tablets) 






>. 


d. 


63 


doz. 


Adrenalini gr. 




tube 


0 10 


72 


doz. 


Apomorphinae hydrochloridi gr. -j^ 


C 


tube 


0 


11 


52 


doz. 


Alropinae sulphatis gr. 


B 


tube 


0 


8 


75 


doz. 


Caffeinae sodio-salic. gr. i 




tube 


1 


0 


60 


doz. 


Gjcainae hydrochloridi gr. . . 


B, F 


tube 


0 


9 


66 


doz. 


Cocains hydrochloridi gr. i 


B. F 


tube 


0 10 


72 


doz. 


Cocaina; hydrochloridi gr. -J 


B, F 


tube 


0 11 


87 


doz. 


G)cainee hydrochloridi gr. J 


B. F 


tube 


1 


1 


111 


doz. 


Cocainse hydrochloridi gr. i 


B, F 


tube 


1 


4 


52 


doz. 


Diamorphinae hydrochloridi gr. iV 


B, F 


tube 


0 


9 


52 


doz. 


Diamorphinae hydrochloridi gr. -J- 


B. F 


tube 


0 


9 


75 


doz. 


Digitalini gr. y-^ .. .. .. 


B 


tube 


0 11 


51 


doz. 


Hyoscinae hydrobromidi gr. 


B 


tube 


0 


8 


63 


doz. 


Morphinae sulphatis gr. i- 


B. F 


tube 


0 


9 


63 


doz. 


Morphinee sulphatis gr. J 


B, F 


tube 


0 


9 


63 


doz. 


Morphinae sulphatis gr. i 


B. F 


tube 


0 


9 


63 


doz. 


Morphinae sulphatis gr. i 


B. F 


tube 


0 


9 


63 


doz. 


Morph. sulph. (i) et atrop. sulph. (2^0) 


B. F 


tube 


0 


9 


63 


doz. 


Morph. sulph. (i) et atrop. sulph. (xTo) 


B. F 


tube 


0 


9 


63 


doz. 


Morph. sulph. (i) et atrop. sulph. (tso) 
Morph. sulph. (J) et atrop. sulph. (tbo) 


B. F 


tube 


0 


9 


63 


doz. 


B. F 


tube 


0 


9 


78 


doz. 


Morph. sulph. (i) et atrop. sulph. (rrk's) 


B. F 


tube 


0 


9 


78 


doz. 


Morphinae tartratis gr. i 


B, F 


tube 


1 


0 


81 


doz. 


Morphinae tartratis gr. i 


B. F 


tube 


1 


0 


51 


doz. 


r^nysostigmmae saiicylatis gr. 


B 


tube 


0 


7 


69 


doz. 


Pilocarpinae nitratis -ie 


B 


tube 


0 11 


87 


doz. 


Pilocarpinae nitratis gr. J 


B 


tube 


1 


1 


99 


doz. 


Pilocarpinae nitratis gr. J 


B 


tube 


1 


2 


75 


doz. 


Quininae hydrobrom. gr. i 
Strophanthin 100 soo 




tube 


1 


1 


51 


doz. 


B 


tube 


0 


8 


51 


doz. 


Strychninae hydrochloridi gr. s'V 


B 


tube 


0 


8 


51 


doz. 


Strychnine hydrochloridi gr. yg 
Strychninae sulphatis gr. . . 


B 


tube 


0 


8 


51 


doz. 


B 


tube 


0 


8 


51 


doz. 


Strychninae sulphatis gr. -^q 


B 


tube 


0 


8 



Cott 



168 
240 
480 
168 
270 
210 
168 
228 
392 
555 
246 
444 
840 
690 
600 
240 
228 
240 
270 
261 
45 
45 
57 
75 
123 
162 
246 



1.000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1.000 
1,000 
1,000 
1.000 
1.000 
1,000 
1.000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1.000 
1 000 
1,000 
1.000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1.000 



Organotherapeutic Tablets 

The term eland it used at a tjrnonyin for 
the desiccated material, and the figures in 
braclcets indicate the approximate equival- 
ence of desiccated and fresh materiaL 



Cerebrinin (1-7) gr. J . . 
Gsrpus luteum (1-5) gr. i 
G)rpus luteum (1-5) gr. 1 
Didymin (1-7) gr. J 
Duodenin (1-7) gr. } . . 
Lymphatic (1-7) gr. | , . 
Mammary (1 -8) gr. J . . 
Ovarian (1-6) gr. ^ 
Parathyroid (1-10) gr. 
Parathyroid (1-10) gr. ^ 
Parathyroid gr. io, calc. lact. gr. 5 
Pituitary (whole) (1-5) gr. i . . 
Pituitary (whole) (1-5) gr. 1 . . 
Pituitary ant. (1-5) gr. 1 
Pituitary post. (1-6) gr. y^ 
Placenta (1-6) gr. 1 
Prostate (1-6) gr. 1 
Spleen (1-5) gr. 1 

Suprarenal (1-5) gr. 1 .. .. ' 
Thymus (1 -6) gr. 1 

Thyroid gr. ^ 

Thyroid gr. i 

Thyroid gr. J 
Thyroid gr. 1 
Thyroid gr. 2 
Thyroid gr. 3 
Thyroid gr. 5 



Selling Price 

(in containers) 



100 

J. d. 



2 10 
4 0 

7 5 

2 10 

4 5 

3 6 

2 10 

3 9 

5 10 

8 9 



10 6 
9 3 



2 10 
4 1 



50 



4 10 

2 3 



0 10 
0 10 

0 11 

1 1 
1 4 

1 9 

2 4 



25 



2 10 
2 6 



0 8 

0 11 

1 0 
1 4 



30 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



October 5, 1935 



Cost 




Selling Fries 

(in containers) 


d. 


per 


too 

1. d. 


50 
.. d. 


25 
«. d. 


50 


1,000 


Alum, et zinci sulph. aa. gr. 1 5 


3 2 


1 9 


1 1 


180 


1,000 


Alum, et zinci s'carb. aa. gr. 30 


3 3 


1 11 


1 2 


96 


1,000 


Boracis co. B.P.C. 


2 0 


1 3 


U 10 


198 


1.000 


Hyd. perchlor. gr. 8.75 . . B 


3 6 


2 0 


1 4 


492 


1.000 


nyd. et pot. lod. gr. o./j . . c 


8 0 


4 3 


2 4 


108 


1,000 


" Mouth-wash, eff." 


2 0 


1 3 


0 10 


57 


1.000 


Nasal., alk. N.H.I 


1 6 


1 1 


0 9 


66 


1.000 


Nasal., alk. co. gr. 10 


1 8 


1 1 


0 9 


99 


1,000 


Nasal., eucal. co. gr. 18 


2 0 


1 3 


0 10 


III 


1.000 


Nasal., phenol, co. gr. 15 


2 3 


1 4 


0 11 


160 


1.000 


Nasal-pharyng. CO. N.I.F. 


3 0 


1 9 


1 1 


87 


1,000 


Sodii chloridi gr. 60 


1 10 


1 2 


0 10 



Surgical Dressings and Appliances 



Cost 



doz. 

doz. 
doz. 

doz. 
doz. 
doz. 

doz. 
doz. 
doz. 
doz. 
doz. 

doz. 
doz. 
doz. 

doz. yds. 
doz. yds. 
doz. yds, 

doz. 
doz. 

doz. 
doz. 
doz. 
doz. 
doz. 
doz. 
doz. 
doz, 
doz. 
doz. 
doz. 
doz 

doz. 
doz. 
doz. 

gross 
gross 

gT<JSS 

gross 
grots 



Bandages 

(G)mpletely wrapped) 



aiico. bleached : M.O.H. 

2 in. X 4 yd 

2i in. X 4 yd 

3 in. X 4 yd 

GJico, unbleached : M.O.H 

2 in. X 4 yd 

2i in. X 4 yd 

3 in. X 4 yd 

Crepe, cream or flesh : M.O.H. 

2 in. 

2i in 

3 in 

3iin .. .. 

4 in. 
Domette : M.O.H. 

2 in. X 6 yd 

2i in. X 6 yd 

3 in. X 6 yd. . . 

Elastic web : M.O.H. 

2 in. .. 

2^ in. 

3 in 

Flannel (wool) : M.O.H. 

2i in. X 4 yd 

3 in. X 6 yd 

Indiarubber : M.O.H. 

3 ft. X 2i in., plain 

3 ft. X 2i in., perforated 

3 ft. X 3 in., plain 

3 ft. X 3 in., perforated 

5 ft. X 2\ in., plain 

5 ft. X 2i in., perforated 

5 ft. X 3 in., plain 

5 ft. X 3 in., perforated 

7i ft. X 2i in., plain . . 

7i ft. X 2i in., perforated 

7i ft. X 3 in., plain 

7i ft. X 3 in., perforated 
Muslin, bleached : M.O.H. 
2i in. X 6 yd 

3 in. X 6 yd 

4 in X 6vd 

Open wove, white (water dressing) : M.O.H. 

1 in. X 3 yd 

1^ in. X 4 yd 

2 in. X 4 yd 

2i in. X 4 yd 

3 in. X 4 yd 



Sell 



each 


0 


3 


each 


0 


4 


each 


0 


5 


each 


0 


2 


each 


0 


3 


each 


0 


4 


each 


0 


11 


each 


1 


1 


each 


1 


4 


each 


1 


6 


each 


1 


9 


each 


0 


9 


each 


0 


10 


each 


1 


0 


per yd. 


0 


9 


per yd. 


0 


10 


per yd. 


1 


0 


each 


0 


10 


each 


1 


S 


eaclt 


2 


3 


each 


2 


8 


each 


2 


8 


each 


3 


2 


each 


3 


5 


each 


4 


0 


each 


3 


9 


each 


4 


5 


each 


4 


9 


each 


5 


6 


each 


6 


0 


each 


6 


8 


each 


0 


3 


each 


0 


4 


each 


0 


5 


each 


0 


1 


each 


0 


2 


each 


0 


3 


each 


0 


3 


each 


0 


3 



Cost 


Bandages 

(Completely wrapped) 


Sell 


d. 


per 






d. 






Open wove, white (water dressing) : M.O.H. 












— cont. 








294 


gross 


4 in. X 6 yd 


each 


0 


4 


441 


gross 




each 


0 


6 






Plaster of Paris : M.O.H. 








120 


doz. 


2 in. X 5 yd 


each 


1 


6 


138 


doz. 


2i in. X 5 yd 


each 


1 


9 


156 


doz. 


3 in. X 5 yd 


each 


2 


0 


180 


doz. 


4 in. X 5 yd 


each 


2 


3 






Ambulance, fast edge : 








54 


doz. 


2 in. X 6 yd. 


each 


0 


8 


66 


doz. 


2i in. X 6 yd 


each 


0 


9 


78 


doz. 


3 in. X 6 yd 




0 10 






Ambulance, loose edge : 








171 


gross 


2 in. X 6 yd 


each 


0 


3 


210 


gross 


2i in. X 6 yd 


each 


0 


3. 


246 


gross 


3 in. X 6 yd 


each 


0 


4 






Binders, twill : 








36 


each 


1 2 in. X 54 in 


each 


5 


3 


40 


each 


18 in. X 54 in 


each 


7 


0 . 


8 
30 


each 




each 


1 


2 


doz. 




each 


0 


6 



Cost 



d. 



7 lb. Tow 12 — 

9 lb. Tow, carbolised . . ..14 — 

First-Aid Cases (refills) 

5 doz. Finger dressings .. .. doz. 0 10 

9 doz. Hand dressings doz. 1 4 
13 doz. Body dressings .. .. doz. 2 0 

7 doz. Bum dressings, finger .. doz. 1 2 

9 doz. Bum dressings, small .. doz. 1 6 

16 doz. Bum dressings, large .. doz. 2 4 

10 doz. Cotton wool (i oz.) .. .. doz. 1 6 

12 doz. Cotton wool (i oz.) .. doz. 1 9 

13 doz. Eye pad doz. 3 6 

6.5 lb. Cellulose wadding . . . . per lb. 1 0 

12 lb. Cellul ose tissue .. .. .. per lb. 1 9 

— — Dalzoflex self-adhesive . . 2^ in. 2 4 3 in. 2 7 
24 ea. Elostoplast bandage, 2i in. . . ea. 2 10 
30 ea. Elastoplast bandage, 3 in. . . ea. 3 6 

— — Flexoplast 2'i in. 2 10 3 in. 3 6 

22 ea. Paragon Elastoplast, 2\ in. . . ea. 2 4 

26 ea. Paragon Elastoplast, 3 in. . . ea. 2 7 

14 ea. Viscopastebandage.3iin.x6yds. ea. 19 

Emp. adhesiv., spools : 

16 doz. i inchX 1 yd. .. .. ea. 0 3 

90 doz. i inch X 5 yd. . . . . ea. 12 

138 doz. i inch X 10 yd ea. 19 

24 doz. 1 inch X 1 yd ea. 0 4 

129 doz. 1 inch X 5 yd ea. 18 

228 doz. 1 inch X 10 yd ea. 2 10 

210 doz. 2 inch X 5 yd. .. ea. 2 8 

Cotton-wool (net weight pkts.) 

14 doz. Medium (M.O.H.) oz. .. - - 0 2 

39 5 doz. Med. (M.O.H.) 4 oz. .. — 0 7 

141 doz. Med. (M.O.H.) 16 oz. ..16 — 

24 doz. Superfine, oz. cartons . . — — 0 3 

66 doz. Superfine, 4 oz. packets . . — 0 8 

240 doz. Superfine. 16 oz 2 9 — 

21 doz. Boric, oz. — — 0 3 

70 doz. Boric, 4 oz — 0 9 

240 doz. Boric, 16 oz 2 9 — 

Catheters, gum-elast. : cost 6d. each, sell Is. Od. Catheters, soft rubl 
Jaques (to size 1 2) : cost 5id. ea., sell lOd. ; over size 1 2, Is. Od. 



Selling Price 



t. d. 



4 oz. 
s. d. 



oz. 

. d. 



1 dr. 
«. d. 



October 5, 1935 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



31 



Gauzes 

(M.O.H. lealed packet*) 



Absorbent sterilised 
Absorbent plain 

ric . . 
iCarbolic 

uble cyanide 
Iodoform 
icric . . 
lalembroth . . 
iblimate 



3 yd. 



Coit 

dot, 
d. 



42 
41 
48 
48 
51 
64 
64 
51 
51 



SeU 

each 
I. i. 



0 6 
0 6 
0 8 
0 8 
0 9 
0 10 
0 10 
0 9 
0 9 



1 yd. 



Cost 

doz. 
i. 



17 

16 
19 

20 
21 
28 
28 
21 
21 



Sell 

each 
d. 



♦ yd. 



Coat 

doz. 

d. 



10 
9 
12 
12 
13 
16 
16 
12 
12 



SeU 
each 
d. 



Cost 



54 
l63 



doz. 
doz. 

doz. 
doz. 
doz. 
doz. 
doz. 
doz. 
doz. 
doz. 
doz. 
doz. 
doz. 
doz. 



Gauze tissue, 4 oz. M.O.H. 
Gauze tissue, 16 oz. M.O.H. 
Lints, M.O.H. (sealed pkts.) 

Plain, 16 oz. . . 

Plain, 8 oz 

Plain, 4 oz. . . 

Plain, 2 oz. 

Plain, 1 oz. .. 

Boric, 16 oz 

Boric, 8 oz. . . 

Boric, 4 oz 

Boric, 2 oz 

Boric, 1 oz 

Ice Bags Check circ. 9 in. 

Rubber black, 9 in. 



Selling Price 



16 oz. 
I. d. 



2 0 

2 4 

8oz. 

1 10 



ee. 
ea. 



4oz. 
». d. 



0 9 



1 3 
0 9 

2 oz. 



1 0 
0 7 

2 oz. 

2 9 

3 0 



I oz. 

>. d. 



0 5 
0 3 



0 4 
0 3 



I dr. 
i. d. 





I2in. 


K 12in. 


12in.X I Sin 


36in. 


X 36iii. 


j Protectives (M.O.H.) 


Cost 


SeU 


Cost 


SeU 


Cost 


Sell 




doz. 


each 


doz. 


each 


doz. 


each 




d. 


d. 


d. 


•. d. 


d. 


^ d. 




42 


0 6 






252 


3 0 




36 


0 6 






180 


3 6 








70 


1 6 


396 


5 6 


[iled cambric 


39 


0 6 






288 


3 6 



Abridged List 


A. &H. 
1. d. 


B. W. 
.. d. 


P. 

X. 


D. 
d. 


Evans 
A. d. 


Bcillus coli 


. . 10 c.c. 




3 


6 










ick Test Products test and 


control 1 c.c 




1 


6 






1 


6 


liphtheria (cone.) 


500 units 


1 6 


1 


6 


1 


3 


1 


3 


iphtheria cone. 


1,000 units 


2 0 


2 


0 






1 


9 


liphtheria cone. 


2,000 units 


3 3 


3 


3 


3 


6 


3 


3 


liphtheria cone. 


3,000 units 




4 


9 


5 


0 


5 


0 


uphtheria, cone. 


4,000 units 


6 0 


6 


0 


6 


0 


6 


0 


nphtheria, cone 


6,000 units 


8 9 


8 


9 


8 


9 


8 


9 


iphtheria, cone. 


8 000 units 


9 6 


9 


6 


9 


6 


9 


6 


nphtheria, prophyl. A.P.T. . . 


. . 1 c.c. 




4 


0 






3 


6 


iphtheria, prophyl. A.P.T. . . 


. . 5 c.c. 




16 


0 










iphtheria, prophyl. A.P.T. . . 


..10 c.c. 












21 


0 


liphtheria, prophyl. F.T. 






2 


6 






2 


0 


Iphtheria, prophyl. T.A.F. . . 


. . 1 c.c. 




3 


0 






3 


0 


Iphtheria, prophyl. TA.M.. . 






2 


6 






2 


6 


vsentery 


20 or 25 c.c. 




8 


6 


8 


6 






wsentery cone. 


10.000 units 


8 6 














lysipelas streptococcus ant. 


.. 10 c.c. 












15 


0 


Bs gangrene (perfringens) . . 


4,000 units 


6 6 


6 


8 


6 


6 






IS gangrene (perfringens) . . 


10.000 units 


15 0 


15 


0 


15 


0 




















5 


0 












6 


0 
















9 


6 







Selling Price 



Serological Products — 

Abridged List — cont. 



Immunogens, various . . 
Influenza (equine) 
Meningococcus antitox. 



..10 c.c. 
. . 30 c.c 

10.000 units 30 c.c. 



Meningococcus 
Meningococcus 
Meningococcus 
Meningococcus 
Meningococcus 
Normal (horse) 
Normal (horse) 



. .3 c.c. cone. 10 c.c. 
. .5 c.c. cone. — 15 c.c. 

20 c.c. 

25 c.c. 

10 c.c. cone. — 30 c.c. 

10 C.C. 

25 C.C 



Phylacogens (boxes of 5) . . . . 1 c.c 

Phylacogens 10 c.c. 

Pneumococcus cone Type 1 . . 4,000 units 
Pneumocoecus Type 1 . . 20,000 units 

Pneumococcus Type 1 high potency (unconc.) 

25,000 units 

Pneumococcus anti (Felton) Types 1 & 2 
10.000 units 

Pneumococcus anti (Felton) Types 1 & 2 
20.000 units 

Pneumococcus Type 2 . . 25.000 units 
Pneumococcus Type 2 cone. . . 20.000 units 
Poliomyelitis serum, anti . . . . 5 c.c. 
Puerperal streptococcus, ant. 
Scarlet fev. strept. ant. .. ..10 c.c. 
Scarlet fev. strept. ant. . . . . 30 c.c. 
Schick Test Products . . . . 1 c.c. per set 
Schick Test Products . . . . 5 ce. per set 
Staphylococcus, antitoxin cone. . . 3 c.c. 
Staphylococcus cone .. ., ..10 c.c. 
Streptococcus, erysipelas . . . . 25 c.c. 
Streptococcus, eofipelas ant. . . 10 c.c. 
Streptococcus, poly val. .. ..10 c.c 
Streptococcus, poly val; cone. . . 10 c.c. 

Streptococcus, polyval. cone. . . 20 c.c. 

Streptococcus, polyval. . . . . 25 c.c. 
Streptococcus, puerp. fever . . . . 10 c.c. 
Streptococcus, puerp. fever . . . . 25 c.c. 
Streptococcus, puerperal ant. . . 10 c.c. 

Streptococcus (scarlatina) 10 c.c. 3.000 U.S.A. 
Tetanus : — units 

1 ,000 international units 

3,000 international units 

10,000 international units .. 

1 6,000 international units . . 

20,000 units 

Thromboplastin 20 c.c. 

Typhoid . . . . . . . . 25 c.c. 



Selling Price 



A.&H. 
d. 



4 0 



7 6 



B. W. 
f. d. 



3 6 



3 6 



8 6 



P. D. 
f. d. 



12 6 
8 0 
30 0 



9 0 
11 8 



33 9 
65 0 



12 6 
32 0 

18 0 



4 7 

24 0 

8 6 



2 0 
4 7 



25 0 
5 3 



Evan* 
,. d. 



6 6 



15 0 









Selling Price 




Veterinary Sera 


A. &H. 


B. W. 


P. D. 


Evans 






>. d. 


3. d. 


t. d. 


». d. 


Anti-leptospira (canine) 


..lOcc 




3 6 






Lamb dysentery 


100 C.C 




18 0 






Streptococcus (equine) 


. . 30 e.c. 






8 0 




Swine erysipelas 


..lOcc 




1 0 




1 0 


Swine erysipelas 


100 e.c 




6 0 




6 0 


Tetanus 


.. 1,000 units 








1 6 


Tetanus 


. . 2,000 units 




2 6 






Tetanus 


.. 3,000 units 








3 3 


Tetanus 


. . 6,000 units 




5 0 




5 0 


Tetanus (vet.) American 


. . 3,000 units 




5 0 


6 0 




Tetanus (vet.) „ 


. . 5,000 units 






9 6 


8 0 


Tetanus (vet.) „ 


.. 10,000 units 








15 0 


White scour (bovine) . . 


..10 e.c 






4 0 




White scour (bovine) . . 


. . 30 c.c. 






8 0 





32 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



October 5, 1935 



Veterinary Vaccines 





Selling Price 


B. W. 
.. d. 


Evans 
s. d. 


— 

Bacillus abortus (killed), 10 c.c 






Bacillus abortus (killed), 25 c.c 




7 0 


Bacillus abortus Giving), 25 c.c. 


7 6 


3 6 


Bacillus abortus, 30 c.c. 


7 6 




Blackleg pilules or cords single, 10 doses 




5 0 


Blackleg pilules, whole culture 25 c.c. 




3 9 


Blackleg pilules, whole culture 50 c.c. . . ' . . 




7 0 


Improved braxy prophylactic 50 c.c. 


7 S 


7 0 


Improved braxy prophylactic 250 c.c. 






Leptospira (canine) 1 c.c 


2 6 




Leptospira (canine) 10 c.c 


15 0 




Lamb dysentery prophylactic 50 c.c. 


7 3 


7 6 


Lamb dysentery prophylactic 250 c.c 


22 8 


22 6 


Mastitis 10 c.c 




4 6 


Mastitis 25 c.c. , . 




7 6 


Roup 10 c.c 




2 6 


Roup 25 c.c. . . . . 




4 6 


Roup 100 c.c 




14 6 


Swine erysipelas (living) 5 c.c. .. 


0 10 


1 0 


Swine erysipelas (living) 25 c.c. 


3 4 


3 6 



Vaccines 



Acne, mixed (10 milL acne, 
250 mill, staphyl.) . . 1 c.c 
Acne, mixed (500 mill, each, 
acne, etc.) . . . . i c.c 
Acne, mixed (20 mill, acne, 
1,000 mill, staphyl.) 1 c.c 
Catarrh, mixed . . I c.c 
Cholera (various) . . 1 c.c 
Coley's fluid . . . . 2 c.c 
Colon bacillus (various) 1 c.c 
Coryza, mixed (various) 
Gonococcus (various) 1 c.c 
Hay fever reaction outAt 
Influenza (various) . . 1 c.c. 
Influenza-pneumonia 
Meningococcus . . 1 c.c. 
Pneumobacillus (Friedlaender) 
1 c.c. 

Pneumococcus (various) 
Pollen toxin diagnostic 

Rheumatic 

Sepsis, mixed 
Staphylococcus (various) 
Streptococcus, polyval. 1 c.c 
Streptococcus, rheum. 1 cc. 
Typhoid (various strengths). . 
Typhoid and paratyphoid . . 
Typhoid, paratyphoid and 

cholera 

Whooping cough, prophyl. . . 
Whooping cough, treatment. . 



Selling Price 



A. &H. 

>. d. 


B. W. 
t. d. 


P. D. 
>. d. 


D.F. 
I. d. 


Evans 
•. d. 


Jenner 
I. d. 


2 6 


2 6 




3 0 


2 9 


2 6 


2 6 


2 6 






2 9 








3 0 




2 9 




2 6 




3 0 


3 0 


2 9 


2 6 


2 6 


2 6 


3 0 


2 6 


2 9 




7 6 














2 6 




2 6 


2 9 


2 6 




2 6 


3 0 




2 9 


2 6 


2 6 


2 6 


3 0 


3 0 


2 9 


2 6 


2 6 




6 0 
3 0 


3 0 


2 9 


2 6 




2 6 


3 0 


3 0 


2 9 








3 0 


3 6 


2 9 




2 6 


2 6 


3 0 


3 0 


2 9 
2 9 


2 6 




2 6 


2 0 

3 0 


2 6 


2 9 


2 6 


2 6 


2 6 


3 0 
3 0 


2 6 


2 9 


2 6 


2 6 


2 6 


3 0 


2 6 


2 9 


2 6 


2 6 


2 6 






2 9 




2 6 


2 6 


3 0 


2 6 


2 9 


2 6 


2 6 


2 6 


3 0 


2 6 


2 9 


2 6 


2 6 


2 6 


3 0 












3 0 


3 0 


2 9 


2 6 






3 0 


2 6 


2 9 


2 6 



Tuberculins 



filtrate 



Undiluted Tuberculins Exotosic 

Old tuberculin, human (T), 1 cc 

Old tuberculin, human (T), 5 c.c 

Old tuberculin, bovine (P.T.) 1 c.c 

Old tuberculin, bovine (P.T.), 5 cc 

Tuberculin bouillon filtrate, human (T.O.A.) I c.c. . . 
Tuberculin bouillon filtrate, human (T.O.A.) 5 c.c . . 
Tuberculin bouillon fihrate, bovine (P.T.O.) 1 cc . . 
Tuberculin bouillon filtrate, bovine (P.T.O.) 5 c.c. . . 

Tuberculin Dilutions 

Old tuberculin (T. or P.T.) and tuberculin bouillon 
(T.O.A. or P.T.O.) 

dilution up to 0.4 c.c. in 1 c.c. 

dilution of 0.5 c.c. to 0.7 c.c. in 1 cc 

dilution of 0.8 c.c. and 0.9 c.c. in 1 c.c 

Tubercle vaccine, bacillary emulsion (B.E.) 

dilutions up to 0.04 mgm. in 1 cc 

dilutions of 0.05 mgm. to 0.7 mgm. in 1 c.c. 

dilutions of 0.8 mgm. to 4 mgm. in 1 c.c . . 



Diagnostic 

Tuberculin (Mantoux tests) 100 

Tuberculin von Pirquet (T, PT., and control), per set 

Tuberculin von Pirquet, 25 per cent, sol 

Tuberculin human (von Pirquet reaction) carton . . 

Tuberculin (vet. diagnosis) 4 c.c 

Tuberculin (vet. diagnosis) 30 c.c 

Tuberculin (vet. ophthalmic and intradermic reactions) 1 cc 
Tuberculin (vet. ophthalmic and intradermic reactions) 5 cc 



Selling Price 



B. W. 
>. d. 



1 0 
1 3 
1 6 



Evans 
<. d. 



1 

1 3 
1 6 

1 

1 3 
1 



7 6 
1 9 
1 3 



HINTS ON STOCKTAKING 

Departmentalising a complex business like that of a chemist and druggist 
is the simplest way to control incoming and outgoing goods, and to gain an 
understanding of prices to be charged for the purpose of yielding suitable 
profits. Since stocktaking is the only safe way of knowing the movement 
of a business up or down, it follows that anything simplifying the operation 
of stocktaking possesses economic value. Writing down a few thousand 
names is the most thankless and time-wasting proposition a business man 
can devise. Stocktaking sheets, where 75 per cent, of the work required 
has been done, must of necessity possess a commensurate value equal to the 
time and labour saved. The C. & D. Retail Price List is compiled on 
sectional or departmental lines; it corresponds with the method of the 
Stocktaking Sheets, and provides a further step in simplifying the labours 
of stocktaking. Stock means goods that are for sale. Fixtures are items 
for the capital account and are valued separately. Before taking stock, 
arrange things so far as possible for estimating numbers and quantity. The 
C. & D. Stocktaking Pad, which sells at 2s. 6d., is arranged in sections, 
and the pricing arrangement is on a progressive basis to the tina! amount. 
The best way to use the stocktaking sheets is for one person to call out the 
quantity of the drug or chemical and for another assistant to enter this in 
the appropriate position on the stocktaking sheets, and if costs or prices 
are available at the time of entry of the quantity of the article, such amount 
should always be inserted at the same time. The sections or departments 
should have the stock taken separately, as the mind working on one section 
rhythmically reaches the end with the least expenditure of energy. 

Pricing : The quantity-price should be that which is usually bought at 
reasonable intervals or used in dispensing, the aim in business being to turn 
stock over quickly, at least five to six times a year. The arrangement of 
the items in the Stocktaking Sheets corresponds with the C. & D. Retail 
Price List, and the prices in the latter are those current at the time of issue. 
When the stocktaking is finished, extend the cost by means of the C. D. 
Retail Price List and transfer the total of each section to the specially ruled 
sheet for the summary provided at the end of the pad. Where articles are 
in bulk and a lb. price is given, subdivide or multiply as the case may need. 
Where syrups or glycerin are taken by volume, divide the lb. cost by 12 
to get the fluid ounce cost. In the case of tinctures or spirits, where a lb. 
cost is given, divide the cost by 18 in order to get the price of a fluid ounce. 
The method is not uniformly accurate, but the margin of error is negligible. 
NX'here ounce cost is given, divide by 7 in order to get drachm price. Where 
drachm cost is given, divide by 50 in order to get the grain price. Stock 
lines other than drugs are set out where a common basis can be given. They 
are best arranged and grouped according to cost : 100 lines at x : and so on, 
but this presupposes that the stock is arranged in an orderly manner. Space 
is provided for such lines for which the details arc not common to all 
businesses. Standardising stock lines in a chemist's business is extremely 
difficult, but much can be done to ease the burden of stocktaking if the idea 
of standardisation is practised wherever possible. 



Printed in Great Britain for the Proprietors by Eyre and Spottiswoode Limited, His Majesty 's Printers, East Harding Street, I;pndon, E.C.4, 
Published by the Proprietors, MOEGAN BROTHERS (Publishers), limited, at 28 Essex fetreet. Strand, London, W.C.2.